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I do not know that it is necessary to say more.

Please act for the best, and at your discretion in other respects. I shall communicate with the quartermaster general, and tell him you wrote to the war department.

THO. F. HUNT, Lieut. Col. and Deputy Quartermaster General. Captain John SANDERS,

New Orleans.

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ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, June 5, 1846. Sir: I have received yours of the 28th ultimo, ordering 20,000 horse-shoes and 20,000 mule-shoes, which I have bargained for at the following rates, viz:

Horse-shoes, $100 per M.

Mule-shoes, $933 per M. The nails will cost from 19 cents to 20 cents per pound, and the whole will be ready for shipment in one month from this date. These prices will not embrace the boxing, cost of inspection, &c.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General Tu. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

[Extract.)

ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, June 7, 1816. Sir: I have your two letters of the 2d instant, and enclose herewith a proposal from one of the largest establishments in the western country to make the wagons required for your department.

The individual to whom you refer in Butler county as wishing to furnish wagons, has not been heard from on that subject; and regarding all other bids but Mr. Townsend's as uncertain, I am disposed to close with him, but not without submitting the thing for further instructions.

It appears that the gum hub is not used in this quarter in constructing wagons, the oak being preferable; and if you insist on having the gum, it must be applied in a green state. In making gun-carriages, we use nothing but oak or walnut for hubs, the gum being entirely out of fashion. I think it will be found that the oak makes the strongest and best job of work of the two.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city,

ALEEGHENY ARSENAL, June 25, 1846. Sir: I have your wagons and harness under way, but I fear they all will not be furnished by the time stipulated. I had to extend this to the 1st August, in consequence of the delay in writing you on the subject of hubs.

If the time should be extended to the 1st of September, the whole would be completed, and on this point I should be pleased to have your views. The boat contractors have gone vigorously to work, and with every prospect of success.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General TH. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

[Extract.]

ALHEGHENY ARSENAL, July 8, 1846.

Sır: The bearer, Mr. Townsend, is one of our largest wagon contractors. He goes to Philadelphia for the purpose of purchasing material for covers, and takes Washington in the route. A genuine ravens duck cannot be had in the eastern market; but a substitute, I understand, is used by the government for the regulation wagons, furnished in Philadelphia, in lieu of the genuine article of duck The material used is called duck, but is not so stout as the other specified in your circular. On this subject Mr. T. will receive your instructions, and I desire you will direct whether we shall use the substitute or not, or name any other article you may deem suitable.

The tread of the regulation wagons under contract in Cincinnati has, I understand, been reduced from 2 to 24 inches, and the price fixed at $125 per wagon. If so, these are important considerations; as the 21 dimension would enable our mechanics to work up a large stock of timber which cannot now be consumed for the 2į tread, besides making a difference of several dollars less in favor of the narrow wheel.

The hurry with which this job is required to be completed renders the profits a mere trifle. I speak knowingly in the matter, as I have had one of the wagons made in our shops, and the result clearly sustains the assertion. A slight advance, therefore, on the price, ($110,) perhaps, under all the circunstance, would be to the interest of the government. It would stimulate the workmen to close their contracts promptly, and at the same time insure a good article.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General Tı. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, July 23, 1846. Sir: I have the honor to inform you, in reply to your letter of the 20th instant, that I am now shipping to Colonel Hunt 24 ox wagons, and about 26 pattern mule wagons; the former with three yokes and two chains each, and the latter with harness for four mules complete. This freight goes in the government steamer

Major Brown,” and, from the favorable stage of the water, she must be in New Orleans in about ten days.

I am expecting a supply of wagons from “ Mckee,” of Butler county. He ought to have at least 10 or 15 in to-morrow: if so, I shall be able to ship sixty-fire by the “ Brown." You may rest assured I will use every effort to carry out your views with regard to procuring wagons and harness, and, so far as may be in my power, I will not fail to advance the interest of the department by endeavoring in all cases to comply with your instructions.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

ALLEGHIENY ARSENAL, July 25, 1816. SIR: In making my contracts for harness, I issued a circular, and addressed it to several of the most prominent dealers in the article, and, the lowest bid for the best kind (according to your specification) was $52 per set, which includes everything complete for four mules.

In a recent report of yours to Congress, I observe you estimate the cost of such harness at $40, and that you are now paying no more in Philadelphia. These circumstances caused me to remonstrate with my men against the extravagance of their price; but, on investigating the subject, I find that the difference in price is sustained by the superior quality of ours over the Philadelphia harness. To test this, the harness makers here would prefer to make such harness as is now furnished in Philadelphia at $40, or even less, than to make mine at $52. I feel convinced that the latter will prove to be the cheapest in the end; but if the war is to continue only for a few months, perhaps a less costly article would answer all purposes. It is, therefore, for you to direct whether in future you will have the cheap harness, in lieu of the other.

It may be proper to mention that Captain Sanders contracted a number of bills for repairs put upon the government steamers lately purchased at this place, which I have paid on the captain's certificate, presuming it to be proper, and that you would approve of my course in this respect.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General Tu. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

[Extract.]

ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, July 30, 1846. Sir: I shipped 51 wagons, with harness complete, in the steamer “Major Brown.” McKee, of Butler county, failed to deliver his according to promise, which curtailed my shipment 15.

É. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General TH. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

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ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, August 8, 1846. Sir: I shipped to Colonel Hunt's address at New Orleans, on the 5th instant, per steamer "Alert,” 31 wagons, &c., complete, and in a few days more I shall send off a like number. The water is down, and we are compelled to ship in low-water boats to Lieutenant Gore, at Newport, who has been requested to push this freight forward with despatch.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To Colonel GEORGE TALCOTT,

Washington city.

[Extract.]

ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, August 15, 1846. Sır: Since my last report on the subject of wagons, I have shipped 42 more to Colonel Hunt.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

[Extract.]

ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, August 18, 1846. Sir: The iron boats (8) referred to in yours of the 14th instant were bargained for on the 16th June, and will be completed in 90 days, according to contract. Two of them are nearly sheeted over, and are to be finished in a few days, and the others will follow in quick succession. The iron has been ordered and prepared for the whole number, and from appearances I should judge that the work will be accomplished.

These boats look very well, and for lighters or tow-boats I think they must answer a good purpose.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General TH. S. JESTP,

Washington city.

[Extract.]

ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, September 2, 1846. Sir: I have shipped to Colonel Hunt, at New Orleans, over 170 wagons, &c., and have 300 more which will be ready in a few days. To what extent I shall proceed with this wagon making, please inform me. They are now turned out very rapidly, and may increase to an unreasonable degree. There is no limit to your instructions. The river continues up, and there is no difficulty in procuring transportation for any number required.

E. HARDING,

Acting Assistant Quartermaster. To General TH. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

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ALLEGHENY ARSENAL, September 10, 1846. Sir: I have your letter of the 7th, and I hasten to reply. I had so far completed the shipment of 250 wagons for Colonel Mackay, in pursuance of your instructions of the 4th instant, that a change could not well be made without injury to the property, and being attended with much trouble and expense. I have therefore deemed it best to let the shipment remain as it had been first regulated.

In writing on the 2d instant I was not fully aware of the extent to which wagons had been manufactured, as tbere were several contractors in the country whom I had lost-sight of, and who have since come in with large stocks and swelled my number to nearly 500, all of which appear to be a good article of the wagon kind'; and' I calculate nearly the whole lot will pass inspection. Understanding that several hundred more wagons would be in upon me in another week, I assumed the responsibility on the 10th instant, and cut the matter short by closing up the business, notwithstanding you had extended the time to the 15th. It is probable you will be annoyed with complaints against me on this subject; but these I shall not regard, as I was influenced by correct motives and the interest of your department in stopping an accumulation of property not now required. Most of the wagons now on th ground have not been finally received and inspected; but as the

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