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After graduation he spent two years in the office of Bert MacDonald, architect, in Austin, and then went to Monterey, Mexico, where he spent two years in the employ of the Monterey water works, making surveys, maps and estimates for a new system of water supply for that city.

In 1897 he accepted a position as draughtsman with the K. C., P. & G. R. R., resigning in 1899 to accept a position as assistant engineer for the Southern Pacific Railroad, in the maintenance of way department, having charge of maintenance of track and permanent structures and surveys for changes of alignment and new work.

In 1901 he left the S. P. R. R. to return to Monterey as architect and engineer for the Monterey Steel Company. This company is spending about $10,000,000 in the erection of a complete steel plant, with its own blast furnaces, foundries, machine shops, rolling mills, railroads, etc., wit all of which Mr. Endress was closely identified.

On account of the failing health of his mother he found it desirable to return to Austin, accepting his election as Instructor in Drawing in the engineering department of this University, entering upon the work in September last.

Mr. Endress was married to Miss Margaret Louise Ledbetter, of Austin, on the 26th of February, 1901.

T. U. T.

was

A good deal of interest is being taken in the steps for the appointment of Cecil Rhodes scholars in the United States. At a recent meeting of

the State Universities' representatives at Wash The Rhodes

ington, D. C., President Prather asked to Scholarships.

undertake the organization of the Southwestern States with reference to these scholarships. At a meeting held in Kansas City in January, the Universities of the States of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Indian Territory, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas were represented. It was agreed that the president of the State University in each State should appoint a committee of three, himself to be chairman, the other members, as far as advisable, to be chosen from other leading institutions in the State. This committee should hold the examinations and take the necessary steps to appoint the candidates. The first appointment will be made in time for the student to take up his residence in Oxford in the fall of 1904. Competitive examinations, based upon the entrance requirements at Oxford, will be held in the University at Austin at some future date. The whole plan is still in a very unsettled state and full details cannot yet be given. A note from a report of the Washington meeting will show this: "George R. Parkin of Toronto, Canada, the agent of the Cecil Rhodes scholarship fund in America, who was present, spoke. He said the trustees would like to carry out the provisions of the will with as much sympathy for local conditions as possible. It was useless, however, to do anything regarding the will unless he first ascertained Oxford's ideas on the will. Oxford is very peculiar, he said, hide-bound by traditions, each one of its twenty-one colleges carefully clinging to its own peculiarities. Dr. Parkin found Oxford nervous in regard to a possible accession of 200 cowboys. He had received an answer to one of his letters addressed to the different Oxford colleges. This college said it could accommodate about four students each year. The colleges in their replies requested that if possible each student should have some one in England vouch for him. For the right young men he recommended an honor under. graduate course. He said he had prepared a circular regarding the will and its conditions for general distribution. One of the conditions in the minds of the trustees is that politics should not enter into the appointments of candidates.” Further announcements regarding these scholarships and the methods of appointment will be made as plans mature.

J, A. L.

use

The sixth annual session of the Summer Schools of the University of Texas will begin June 11 and will continue until July 24. The Regents

annually give the of the buildings, laboraThe Summer

tories, libraries, museums and lecture rooms of Schools of 1903.

the University during this period to the teachers of Texas, who desire to improve their scholarship and professional attainments. Two hundred and sixty students were enrolled during the past summer, representing the best schools of the State.

The faculty of officers and instructors for the present session numbers twenty-two. College courses will be offered in botany, education, geology, German, physics, Latin, mathematics, psychology, chemistry, English, history, Greek and Spanish. In addition the University Summer Normal will give instruction in all branches required for the first grade and permanent, and permanent primary certificates above those of the second grade. At the close of the school, examinations will be held covering all branches for such persons as desire to secure the higher grade certificates.

A manual training department has been instituted for the session of 1903 in charge of Mr. Hunsdon, who at present is director of manual training in the High School at Austin. Mr. Hunsdon is a graduate of the St. Louis Manual Training School, was a student in Washington University, St. Louis, for three years, and has also studied in Columbia University, New York City. In view of the present wide-spread interest in manual training in Texas, it is expected that the attendance on this course will be large.

Dr. Frederic Eby, Professor of Pedagogy and Philosophy in Baylor University, and President H. C. Pritchett of the Sam Houston Normal Institute, will be connected with the faculty this year. The other instructors have been chosen from the regular University faculty, and the schools are under the deanship of Professor W. S. Sutton. Board may be secured in Austin at reasonable rates, and the railroads will put on the usual low rates. Throughout the session weekly lectures will be given on subjects of general interest by prominent professors, and a weekly round-table will be held, at which educational problems will be freely discussed.

It is the desire of the authorities of the University to make the institution of the greatest use to all the educational forces of the State. In the furtherance of this purpose, the summer schools have been instituted for the teachers of Texas, and year by year the number in attendance is in. creasing

J. A. L.

The tenth Cactus will appear some time in May. It has grown in ten years to a weighty volume of some three hundred and fifty pages. The

Cactus purports to represent life at the University of The Coming

Texas in all its phases. Faculty, classes, fraternities, Cactus.

clubs, societies are given space for pictures and statistics. In this way the publication forms an invaluable record, preserves traditions, and is a unifying force in college life.

First the Cactus is a record. But it has other interests and depart. ments. It publishes the best literary output of the University, stories, poems and humor. Another department has had a marked growth in the last few years, not only in the Cactus, but in other college annuals. The college annual in many colleges has assumed the rôle played of old by the fool at court. License is recognized for joking individuals upon their follies and foibles, often reaching the most venerable and respected characters about the institution, and satirizing organizations and customs which lend themselves readily to that sort of treatment. This deparment serves to give the publication pungency and tang, and affords one day, so to speak, for the open expression of student sentiment on various matters, which for one reason or another is suppressed during the other three hundred and sixty-four days of the year.

The present annual board has been hard at work for the past three months, and hope to get out a book that will measure up to the high standards set by previous issues. The forthcoming issue will be bound in unfin. ished leather, will contain over three hundred pages, and will represent, as fully and completely as a book can, life at the University of Texas during the 1902-03 session. It will be an epitome of this year's work; it will be a souvenir in years to come mayhap of happier days.

We are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Rudolf Tombo, Jr., Registrar of Columbia University, for the following table (taken from an article in University

Science, Dec. 26, 1902) of statistics of attendance at the Registration various leading universities of the country. The figures

Statistics. given are approximately as of November 1, 1902. It is not an easy matter to make a correct comparison between institutions, so different are the methods of registration, but there is tendency to uniformity in this matter:

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* Includes Schools of Engineering, Chemistry, Architecture, Mines, and Mechanic Arts. + Included in Scientific Schools. • Included in college statistics.

Included in college statistics. 178 law students are enrolled. || Included in college and scientific school statistics. About 533 graduate students are enrolled.

The numbers for the University of Texas, arranged in the same order, are as follows:

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A few progressive spirits, at every stage of the University's growth, have felt the need of music. Some have had the courage to strive earnestly

efforts were made in the '90's, but they were for speGlee Club. toward supplying that need. Laudable and successful

cial occasions only. Organizations were effected three years ago this spring, which, we trust, will prove permanent.

The Glee Club was organized for the special purpose of assisting in the effort of a few ladies to liquidate a debt resting upon the piano now in the Auditorium. The organizer then conceived the plan of continuing the club. He began by trying to enlist the sympathy and encouragement of the faculty and the student body—a difficult task. Little attention was paid the failthful men who stuck to their posts and practiced regularly twice a week with pleasure and profit to themselves. They had neither music nor money, so the copying and duplicating process was adopted as a last resort. And yet those were “good old days,” when every man was present because he liked to sing. There were no stars, but there was interest and united effort.

Work was resumed at the opening of the next session with the same determined persistence. An incentive was added, a hope presented, by the director, that the faculty might consent to the club's taking a trip at some time during the year, if sufficient proficiency was attained. In the face of the refusal of all stars to take part, and in spite of many wagging heads, the hope was realized. The club sang acceptably in Brenham, Temple, Waxahachie, Waco, Corsicana, Tyler, Palestine, sometimes to few, generally to a good house, always to enthusiastic listeners. A deficit faced the members when they returned home, but they cheerfully paid it. Be it said to the credit of the club that it has never called upon a single outsider for a cent of money, and further that no voluntary contributions have ever been received.

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