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low rates. Throughout the session weekly lectures will be given on subjects of general interest by prominent professors, and a weekly round-table will be held, at which educational problems will be freely discussed.

It is the desire of the authorities of the University to make the institution of the greatest use to all the educational forces of the State. In the furtherance of this purpose, the summer schools have been instituted for the teachers of Texas, and year by year the number in attendance is increasing.

J. A. L.

The tenth Cactus will appear some time in May. It has grown in ten years to a weighty volume of some three hundred and fifty pages. The Cactus purports to represent life at the University of Texas in all its phases. Faculty, classes, fraternities, clubs, societies are given space for pictures and statistics. In this way the publication forms an invaluable record, preserves traditions, and is a unifying force in college life.

The Coming
Cactus.

First the Cactus is a record. But it has other interests and departments. It publishes the best literary output of the University,-stories, poems and humor. Another department has had a marked growth in the last few years, not only in the Cactus, but in other college annuals. The college annual in many colleges has assumed the rôle played of old by the fool at court. License is recognized for joking individuals upon their follies and foibles, often reaching the most venerable and respected characters about the institution, and satirizing organizations and customs which lend themselves readily to that sort of treatment. This deparment serves to give the publication pungency and tang, and affords one day, so to speak, for the open expression of student sentiment on various matters, which for one reason or another is suppressed during the other three hundred and sixty-four days of the year.

The present annual board has been hard at work for the past three months, and hope to get out a book that will measure up to the high standards set by previous issues. The forthcoming issue will be bound in unfinished leather, will contain over three hundred pages, and will represent, as fully and completely as a book can, life at the University of Texas during the 1902-03 session. It will be an epitome of this year's work; it will be a souvenir in years to come mayhap of happier days.

University Registration

We are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Rudolf Tombo, Jr., Registrar of Columbia University, for the following table (taken from an article in Science, Dec. 26, 1902) of statistics of attendance at the various leading universities of the country. The figures given are approximately as of November 1, 1902. It is not an easy matter to make a correct comparison between institutions. so different are the methods of registration, but there is tendency to uniformity in this matter:

Statistics.

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* Includes Schools of Engineering, Chemistry, Architecture, Mines, and Mechanic Arts.

+Included in Scientific Schools.

Included in college statistics.

Included in college statistics. 178 law students are enrolled.

Included in college and scientific school statistics. About 53 graduate students are enrolled.

Pennsylvania.

Princeton.

Syracuse.

Wisconsin.

Yale.

Harvard.

Indiana.

Johns
Hopkins.

Leland

Stanford, Jr.

Michigan.

The numbers for the University of Texas, arranged in the same order,

are as follows:

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A few progressive spirits, at every stage of the University's growth, have felt the need of music. Some have had the courage to strive earnestly

Glee Club.

efforts were made in the '90's, but they were for spetoward supplying that need. Laudable and successful cial occasions only. Organizations were effected three years ago this spring, which, we trust, will prove permanent.

The Glee Club was organized for the special purpose of assisting in the effort of a few ladies to liquidate a debt resting upon the piano now in the Auditorium. The organizer then conceived the plan of continuing the club. He began by trying to enlist the sympathy and encouragement of the faculty and the student body-a difficult task. Little attention was paid the faithful men who stuck to their posts and practiced regularly twice a week with pleasure and profit to themselves. They had neither music nor money, so the copying and duplicating process was adopted as a last resort. And yet those were "good old days," when every man was present because he liked to sing. There were no stars, but there was interest and united effort.

Work was resumed at the opening of the next session with the same determined persistence. An incentive was added, a hope presented, by the director, that the faculty might consent to the club's taking a trip at some time during the year, if sufficient proficiency was attained. In the face of the refusal of all stars to take part, and in spite of many wagging heads, the hope was realized. The club sang acceptably in Brenham, Temple, Waxahachie, Waco, Corsicana, Tyler, Palestine, sometimes to few, generally to a good house, always to enthusiastic listeners. A deficit faced the members when they returned home, but they cheerfully paid it. Be it said to the credit of the club that it has never called upon a single outsider for a cent of money, and further that no voluntary contributions have ever been received.

The second year opened and closed auspiciously. The club was popular at home and abroad. Denton, Bonham, Sherman, Denison, Dallas, Taylor, Laredo, San Antonio, greeted the members enthusiastically, and there was a greater demand for their services at home than could be supplied. The Sunday commencement music was turned over to the club and many among the audience expressed their appreciation.

Though the majority of last year's club did not return, prospects at the opening of the present session were brighter than ever before and the two glimpses of the club accorded the public have been satisfactory.

The club is now in good condition and will make its annual trip in April well equipped both as to the selection and the rendition of music. A Mandolin and Guitar Club will be an additional feature of this year's concerts. The sextette of last year, though very satisfactory, was not what the public expects in connection with a glee club.

Another feature of the work accomplished in connection with other musical organizations of the University is the opportunity which has been afforded the University and general public of hearing first-class musical artists from abroad. If one is to judge from results meager recognition of the opportunity has been manifested by either students or citizens. But the day will come when artists of first rank can draw good houses. The only way to accomplish such a result is by persevering in education along musical lines, and the writer hopes that the musically inclined will not give up the fight.

Another mission of the Glee Club, the principal one, has but begun, that of introducing college songs. No tradition clings to the college man so tenaciously as the songs. The good work is at last under way: words have been written, but no music. So far songs from other sources have been adapted to our local words. If the whole student body could be persuaded to join in singing even these adapted airs, some musical spirit would be presently moved to compose a stirring air befitting our history and our hopes.

D. A. P.

Band.

The opening of this session-the third year of the Band's existencefound that organization with what appeared to be more than its share of loss in membership. L. C. Audrain, leader during the first two sessions; Clifton Sheppard, the inimitable and enthusiastic baritone player; K. C. Miller, R. D. Gist, S. J. Wilson, R. E Thomas, A. L. Kramer-all had left the University permanently, and thus the band was reduced to a mere handful. That this institution is destined to live and thrive is proven by the fact that on March 2 last the Band not only played as well as ever before, but also showed the proportionate amount of improvement that it should show on the third year of its existence. The vacancies had been filled by new men who are able to hold their own. The Band continues to enjoy the benefit of Dr. Baxter's direction. Too much praise cannot be given

this gentleman for the valuable services which he untiringly donates to the band in his usual kind manner. The success of this year's organization also springs, as heretofore, from the steadiness and quiet enthusiasm of its members. The prospects of a trip do not urge them to rehearsals: they work because they enjoy it—they enjoy giving pleasure to the University people. While all members equally deserve individual mention, special reference is due to Mr. Stephens, the talented cornet player and this year's leader. He has added very largely to this year's success.

The Band owns a valuable set of instruments, which have been partly paid for by money earned by the Band. These instruments are to be left here as permanent property belonging to the University. The money still due for these instruments should be paid for by the end of this session. How that may be possible is hard to say, because nobody in the University has ever been asked to contribute a cent to anything connected with the musical organizations and they do not wish to depart from this precedent. There have been two voluntary contributions of $25 each: one by President Prather, and another by another party. However, the Band is confiIdent that in time it will be able to meet the debt.

Besides paying this debt other needs are not insignificant. There should be a permanent place for rehearsals, so that property may be properly taken care of; music, too, will be needed, and perhaps an inexpensive bandstand on the campus. Uniforms also have been suggested. But the Band, in common with other musical organizations, has a need that should be met as promptly as possible; one or two men should be appointed whose business it should be to train the organization, give individual members special attention, and attend to the innumerable details that may arise. This takes time, and work, and should be paid for. Usually a prominent student with special ability in this work is selected, but he can scarce be expected to give his time free of charge. Without such an arrangement the present organizations are doomed to a short period of life, and there can be no systematic development. But where may the musical organizations raise the money for such extra expense? The money they have needed so far, they have raised in various ways other than by touching the much drawn upon pockets of the students and faculty, and it is not intended that they shall ever have recourse to such means. Is it possible that the University authorities could defray this expense, as they do at other institutions?

Surely, the advisability of spending money on this phase of student life cannot be questioned. At present the musical organizations have altogether eighty-five active members; their membership is mainly made up from advanced classes, and last year two instructors and six fellows took part. How would the public exercises of the University impress outsiders and students if not a song or a musical sound were heard except perhaps from a hired band?

In view of all this, is it advisable that the University authorities materially aid the musical organizations? Or are they willing to see the present growth stunted or even terminated?

E. P. S.

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