Genesis and Birth of the Federal Constitution: Addresses and Papers in the Marshall-Wythe School of Government and Citizenship of the College of William and Mary

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Julian Alvin Carroll Chandler
Macmillan, 1924 - Constitutional history - 397 pages
 

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Page 156 - That no free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people, but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue, and by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.
Page 154 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity, namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property...
Page 266 - The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other for their common defence, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Page 365 - He has waged cruel war against human nature itself, violating its most sacred rights of life and liberty in the persons of a distant people who never offended him, captivating and carrying them into slavery in another hemisphere, or to incur miserable death in their transportation thither.
Page 263 - That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs, has been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall in the opinion of the representatives of the people, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America in general.
Page 170 - State; that standing armies, in time of peace, should be avoided as dangerous to liberty ; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by, the civil power.
Page 270 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Page 154 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of publicservices; which, not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator, or judge to be hereditary.
Page 318 - RESOLVED. That the preceding CONSTITUTION be laid before the UNITED STATES in Congress assembled, and that it is the opinion of this Convention, that it should afterwards be submitted to a Convention of Delegates, chosen in each State, by the people thereof; under the recommendation of its legislature, for their assent and ratification...
Page 316 - The friends of our country have long seen and desired that the power of making war, peace, and treaties, that of levying money and regulating commerce, and the correspondent executive and judicial authorities, should be fully and effectually vested in the General Government of the Union...

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