Analytical Sixth Reader: Containing an Introductory Article on the General Principles of Elocution, with a Thorough Method of Analysis, Intended to Develop the Pupil's Appreciation of the Thought and Emotion, and a Critical Phonic Analysis of English Words : Designed for the Use of Normal and High Schools, and the Highest Classes in Common Schools

Front Cover
Mason Brothers, 1867 - Elocution - 494 pages

From inside the book

Contents

Gods Judgment on a Wicked Bishop Robert Southey 174
31
We Cherish the Memory of our Honored Dead
32
The Veto Power Edward Everett 177
33
The Poor Voter on Election day J G Whittier 185
34
Responsibility of a Representative Edmund Burke 186
35
The Same Subject Continued 189
36
The Eve of Election
37
An Oration on La Fayette
38
The Battle of Bunker Hill
39
Proclamation on Nullification
40
The Same Subject Continued
41
Last Inaugural of Lincoln
42
PRINCIPLES AND GENERAL DIRECTIONS
43
Doleful Evils of the Press
44
Barbara Frietchie
45
Trial of Warren Hastings Analysis of the same
46
Invocation to Light
47
The Pretext of Rebellion Andrew Marvell J G Whittier T B Macaulay
48
Inflections
49
The Roman Twins
50
A Tribute to Abraham Lincoln
51
or a Leap for Life G P Morris
52
SELECTIONS
53
Influence of Slavery
54
Christian in Doubting Castle
55
The Same Subject Continued
56
Rock Me to Sleep
57
We should not Despise Small Begin nings
58
Farewell Address
59
War Better than a False Peace
60
Our Heroes Living and Dead
61
Through Death to Life
62
Geologic Proofs that the Earth is Old Hugh Miller
63
The Same Subject Continued PAGE
64
Bachelors Hall Anonymous 268
65
Ends to be Attained by Education Horace Mann 269
66
The Same Subject Continued 273
67
Bring Flowers
70
remember I remember
71
God Creates no Broken Forms
72
Burn of Eathie
73
Adventure with a Buffalo
74
Shallow Sea in Scotland
75
Ichthyolitic Beds
76
Greatness of Shakspeare
77
The Heritage of Culture Mrs F Hemans 276
78
The Burial of Sir John Moore Charles Wolfe 304
79
Virtue to be Loved and Sought for Itself Cicero
80
The Burial of Moses
81

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 114 - Wept o'er his wounds or tales of sorrow done, Shouldered his crutch and showed how fields were won. Pleased with his guests, the good man learned to glow. And quite forgot their vices in their woe; Careless their merits or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began.
Page 251 - But as it is easy to foresee that from different causes and from different quarters much pains will be taken, many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth, as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed...
Page 210 - Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said : " The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.
Page 253 - Towards the preservation of your government, and the permanency of your present happy state, it is requisite, not only that you steadily discountenance irregular oppositions to its acknowledged authority, but also that you resist with care the spirit of innovation upon its principles however specious the pretexts.
Page 395 - And I have loved thee, Ocean ! and my joy Of youthful sports was on thy breast to be Borne, like thy bubbles, onward : from a boy I wantoned with thy breakers — they to me Were a delight : and if the freshening sea Made them a terror — 'twas a pleasing fear, For I was as it were a child of thee, And trusted to thy billows far and near, And laid my hand upon thy mane — as I do here.
Page 115 - Beside the bed where parting life was laid, And sorrow, guilt, and pain, by turns dismayed, The reverend champion stood. At his control, Despair and anguish fled the struggling soul ; Comfort came down the trembling wretch to raise And his last faltering accents whispered praise.
Page 228 - Yet not the more Cease I to wander where the Muses haunt Clear spring, or shady grove, or sunny hill, Smit with the love of sacred song...
Page 363 - Work - work work Till the brain begins to swim! Work - work - work Till the eyes are heavy and dim! Seam , and gusset , and band , Band , and gusset , and seam , Till over the buttons I fall asleep, And sew them on in a dream! "O men with sisters dear! O men with mothers and wives! It is not linen you're wearing out , But human creatures
Page 59 - tis said, when all were fired, Filled with fury, rapt, inspired, From the supporting myrtles round They snatched her instruments of sound ; And, as they oft had heard apart Sweet lessons of her forceful art, Each (for Madness ruled the hour) Would prove his own expressive power.
Page 406 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall.

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