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August 26, 1929.

Porto Rico reservations.

Preamble.

Vol. 39, p. 954.

Lands transferred to people of Porto Rico for public use.

Description.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

DONE in the City of Washington this second day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and [SEAL] twenty nine, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and fifty-fourth.

By the President:

HL STIMSON

Secretary of State.

HERBERT HOOVER

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, by Act of Congress approved March 2, 1917 (39 Stat. 951), entitled "An Act to provide a civil government for Porto Rico and for other purposes" it is provided, "That the President may from time to time, in his discretion, convey to the People of Porto Rico such lands, buildings, or interests in lands or other property now owned by the United States and within the territorial limits of Porto Rico, as in his opinion are no longer needed for purposes of the United States";

AND WHEREAS, the President, by an Executive Order of June 30, 1903, reserved for military purposes certain lands designated as the Military Reservation of San Juan, and said Military Reservation included the tract known as San Geronimo hereinafter described.

AND WHEREAS, the said tract, known as San Geronimo, and hereinafter more particularly described (excepting approximately five acres thereof), is no longer needed for the purposes of the United States but is required for public use by the People of Porto Rico,

NOW, THEREFORE, in pursuance of the authority vested in me by the Act of March 2, 1917, aforesaid, all the right, title, and interest of the United States in and to the following described tract of land is hereby transferred and conveyed to the People of Porto Rico, viz: Beginning at a point No. 84 on the Military Road, as shown on the Military Chart of the Military Reservation of San Juan, Porto Rico, and extending in a straight line N. 23° 29' E., through point No. 83 to the sea; thence easterly along the shore line and outside of Fort San Geronimo to the Laguna; thence southerly and outside of the shore line of Fort San Geronimo, and westerly and southerly along the shore line of the Laguna to San Antonio Battery; thence along San Antonio Channel to a point where the line through points No. 83 and No. 84 intersects the channel; thence along the line N. 23° 29′ E. to point No. 84, together with all the right, title, and interest of the United States in all shore and submerged lands lying shoreward of a line drawn through points Nos. 90, 91, 92 and 93, as shown on the military chart of the Military Reservation of San Juan, Porto Rico; excepting and reserving, however, from the above described tract hereby conveyed, five (5) acres, more or less, heretofore assigned to Tract reserved for the uses of the Navy Department for the development of the naval communication service and for other purposes of the United States, southerly of and contiguous to the tract heretofore leased to Virgil Baker, and bounded on the north by the southerly line of the said Virgil Baker tract, being a straight line drawn from the point known as Point 85 at the southwesterly corner of the Virgil Baker tract, easterly along the southerly line of said Virgil Baker tract through

naval communication service.

Point 86 to the Laguna; on the west by a straight line drawn southerly
from said Point 85 along the westerly line of the tract hereby con-
veyed; on the east by the shore line of the Laguna; and on the south
by the northerly line of a proposed road the course and location of
which road are to be fixed hereafter. The United States retains title
to and jurisdiction over the said last mentioned five acre tract.
IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and
caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

DONE at the City of Washington this twenty-sixth day of August
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and twenty-
[SEAL] nine, and of the Independence of the United States of
America the one hundred and fifty-fourth.

By the President:

HL STIMSON

Secretary of State.

HERBERT HOOVER

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

It has been the custom for the President of the United States to request the observance of Fire Prevention Week throughout the nation, and to assign the week in which the anniversary of the great Chicago fire occurs for such observance. The fine interest manifested in fire prevention by public officials, business men's organizations, women's clubs, civic organizations and the press has already borne fruit. For two consecutive years fire losses in the United States have been decreased and there are indications of a further reduction during the present year. A further great reduction of this tremendous waste could be effected through the exercise of ordinary care on the part of our citizens.

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Designating week of

Therefore, I, Herbert Hoover, President of the United States, do October 6, 1929, to be hereby proclaim the week of October 6th to be observed as Fire observed as. Prevention Week. To each citizen I recommend full cooperation in securing wider understanding of individual responsibility for it is only through further elimination of human negligence that lasting progress can be attained.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the City of Washington this eighteenth day of September
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and
[SEAL] twenty-nine and of the Independence of the United States
of America the one hundred and fifty-fourth.
HERBERT HOOVER

By the President:

HENRY L STIMSON
Secretary of State.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS it is provided by the Act of Congress approved March 4, 1909, entitled "An Act to Amend and Consolidate the Acts Respecting Copyright", that the copyright secured by the Act,

September 28, 1929.

Preamble.
Vol. 35, p. 1075.

Copyrights.

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Vol. 35, p. 1077.

Action by Irish Free State.

Benefits extended to citizens of Irish Free

except the benefits under Section 1 (e) thereof as to which special conditions are imposed, shall extend to the work of an author or proprietor who is a citizen or subject of a foreign state or nation, only upon certain conditions set forth in Section 8 of the said Act, to wit:

(a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciled within the United States at the time of the first publication of his work; or (b) When the foreign state or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection substantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this Act or by treaty; or when such foreign state or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, at its pleasure, become a party thereto:

AND WHEREAS it is provided by Section 1 (e) of the said Act of Congress, approved March 4, 1909, that the provisions of the Act 'so far as they secure copyright controlling the parts of instruments serving to reproduce mechanically the musical work, shall include only compositions published and copyrighted after this Act goes into effect, and shall not include the works of a foreign author or composer unless the foreign state or nation of which such author or composer is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement or law, to citizens of the United States similar rights

AND WHEREAS the President is authorized by the said Section 8 to determine by proclamation made from time to time the existence of the reciprocal conditions aforesaid, as the purposes of the Act may require;

AND WHEREAS satisfactory official assurances have been received that on and after October 1, 1929, citizens of the United States will be entitled to copyright protection in the Irish Free State which is substantially equal to the protection afforded by the copyright laws of the United States, including rights similar to those provided by Section 1 (e) of the Act of Congress approved March 4, 1909, relating to copyright.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, HERBERT HOOVER, President of the State, including me- United States of America, do declare and proclaim

chanical musical reproductions.

Conditions.

That on and after October 1, 1929, the conditions specified in Sections 8 (b) and 1 (e) of the Act of March 4, 1909, will exist and be fulfilled in respect to the citizens of the Irish Free State and that from October 1, 1929, they will be entitled to all the benefits of the Act of March 4, 1909, including Section 1 (e) thereof and the Acts amendatory of the said Act.

PROVIDED that the enjoyment by any work of the rights and benefits conferred by the Act of March 4, 1909, and the Acts amendatory thereof, shall be conditional upon compliance with the requirements and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States.

AND PROVIDED FURTHER that the provisions of Section 1 (e) of the Act of March 4, 1909, in so far as they secure copyright controlling the parts of instruments serving to reproduce mechanically musical works shall apply only to compositions published after July 1, 1909, and registered for copyright in the United States which have not been reproduced within the United States prior to October 1, 1929, on any contrivance by means of which the work may be mechanically performed.

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