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Letter of Capt. L. Warrington to the secre- MEDICAL CASES
tary of the navy-same affair
199 Cure for the gout

309
between S. Smith, R. M. Johnson and

a wound in the chest

310
Jas. Monroe and I). D. Tumpkins

203
cataract in the eye

327
of Col. Hawkins to the secretary of

hydrophobia

383, 408
state about Indian hostility

218
yellow fever

408
of Th. Jefferson to Presdt. Carr on Medical Companion, Dr. Ewell's reviewed 353
education

233|| Memorial on the separation of Maine 274
of Mayhew Folger to the British ad. Merlin (of Douay) exiled

128
miralty about Pitcairn Island (Pacifie) 256 || Mexican revolutionists

400
of T. Staines on the same subject 236 || Military claims, official notice for

231
circular, of the governor of Virginia Militia, payment of

387
to the county courts about internal im- Mina, arrival at Baltimore

336
provements
251 Mississippi territory memorial

78
of J. Beard, G. M'Dougall, E. Pent-

river navigation

144
land and G. B. Larned about the British at- Missouri described

283
attack on the Union on lake Erie

276 Mitchell's, Dr. S. L'account of the origin of
of Gen. Cass to the cominander of
the Indians

168
the Tecumseh, which attacked the Union 278 | Monarchy

191
of R. J. Meigs on the civilization of Monument and epitaph of Lawrence

143
the Cherokees
281 || Moons, mock

320
of R. Easton, describing the Missouri
Morillo and his army

204
country
283 Muller the engraver, death of

350
of J. Adams, written 5th of July, 1776 289 Mutineers of the bounty

235
from an American officer at Algiers Naples city present to the Duchess of Berri 240
about Exmouth's attack
302 || National currency, treasurer's letter

152
about French illiberality, degrada-

Institute in France abolished

414
tion, &c.
303 | Natural wonders

110
of Th. Jefferson to the Peace Society 307 Natural history, &c. remarks

412
of J. Adams to do.
308 || Naturalists in America

366
of Wm. Lee, offering to transact Ame- Naval anectode

112
rican affairs in France
315 || Naval Temple

301
of J. Lorian on the changes in vegeta- Navy of the U. S. promotions in

218
tion
334 || New-England described

390, 409
from Bordeaux on the condition of New-Hampshire governor's speech

260
things in France
334 || New-Orleans commerce

144
of Shaler and Shaw about Algerine

floods

224, 256, 272, 304
affairs

348
importance

266
of Wm. Lee, about F. Gard, the deaf New South-Wales

396
and dumb teacher
348 || News, scarcity of

208
of F. Gard to Dr. S. L. Mitchell about Newspapers, French, tax on
his schools

348 || New-York population
of J. Graham and J. Simpson about Ney, Marshal, account of
the shipwreck of the brig Commerce 360 Nisme's insurrection

350
intercepted, of S. De Moxo, Spanish Nomination of president, &c.

202
general of Caraccas, and Governor Urreiz- Notices, &c. to subscribers

64, 96
ticta

362
to postmasters, &c.

225
of Dr. E. Smith on education
362 Nouevel, Antenor

306
of an American in Edinburg 366 || Ogilvie the speaker

384
between Win. Cobbett and Com. D. Ohio exporting and importing company's bills 160
Porter, relative to the Quarterly Review 376 Orator, what he is not

193
of J. Lorian on natural history, &c. 412 || Orchards

62, 379
Treaty of Ghent

98 || Orders in council about the exportation of
Paris

101

arms, &c.
Light houses

263, 350

health regulations ibid
Literary notices
368 || Paper money.

4, 19
Locusts, general account of 242, 317, 404 | Paragua missions

268
London Quarterly Review, history of

273 || Parties, political essays on

209, 257, 305
Loom, Savage's steam
304 || Peach trees

263
Louisiana described
267 || Peddie, Major, expedition to Africa

351
Lyon's disturbances
158 Pelignier the conspirator

400
Macedonian frigate, arrival of
416 | Persian embassy to France

304
Maine, separation of

274 | Pike steam boat
Mammoth cave in Kentucky
392 Pinkney's oratory described

82
Manufactures, domestic
145, 220, 344 Pittsburg, trade of

266
expeditious

160 | Plague in Dalmatia, Naples, &c. 141, 142
Marble elastic
80 Plaster of Paris, rise of

218
Marmion, Barker's play of

258
trade restricted

404
Marriages, royal, &c.
208 Platina, uses of

364
Massachusetts Governor's speech
248 | Pope repeals the concordat

208
inspections

408
Joan

302
McDonald, Marshal, implicated in conspiracy 335 | Population of Great Britain and Ireland 111
Meade, R. Esq. imprisoned
352, 371" Porter, Com. letter of, to Cobbett

378

269
388
285

200

143
273
400

400

269

Porter's letter to Cobbett, remarks on 376, 385 || Smith the murderer of Carson

336, 386
Porto Rico, commercial regulations with 71 Smuggling of negroes

288
Portraits, sale of
313 || Snow at Quebec

176, 304
416
Portugal, prince of

coloured

192
Post office, general
150 storm at Albany

ibid
Postage rates
129 || Snuff boxes to the northern ministers

208
Potatoes, raising
309, 345 || Soult exiled

128
President, prize money for, distributed 288 || South-American affairs 203, 285, 288, 312, 360
President's message, Dec. 5, 1816

7

369, 384, 415, 416
Price current

160
statistics

313
Prince Regent's orders to the Hanoverians 240 || Spanish atrocities

206, 350
reprimands Bruce, Wilson, and

conspiracy

208, 288
Hutchinson

320
jealousy

304
Princess of Wales in travels

320
hostility

335, 352, 368
Prize essays
269 || Specie and paper money

4, 180
Proclamations (see documents.)

Specimen of the history of the late war 188
Prometheus sloop of war
400, 416 Stanhope, Lady Hester

336, 350
Promotions (see elections.)

States, critique on
Pronunciation, remarks on

319 || Staunton convention

158
Property tax

Steam engines

144, 270
Prospectus, original

1
frigates described

246
Prussian affairs

304, 384 boats, accidents happening to
Public opinion, power of

112
boat Pike

143
Queen Charlotte's drawing room

158
Enterprise

144
Queen of Hayti's dress

160
Union

176
Rebellion in Virginia, Bacon's history of 278, 292 loom of Savage

304
Redheffer's machine called up again 352, 368 | Stearn, A. his arithmetical machine

269
Reid, Maj. John, biography of

214 | Story, Judge, opinion of, in the case of a
Reports (see documents.)

minor enlisted

399
Rhenish Mercury, editor tried
142 || St. Cyr implicated in conspiracy

335
Rhode Island, governor's speech
298 || St. Helena regulations

158
Reidel the painter, death of
350|| St. Louis population

96
Rial, Gen. appointed governor of Grenada 128 || Sugar, history of

397
Riley's, Capt. narrative of his shipwreck 72, 359 || Summachus, MSS. of, found
Robinson's, et al. law opinion in the case of Sun, spots in

174, 326
Bruce, Hutchinson, and Wilson

207
flags in

398
Roads and canals, report on
86|| Sunday schools, British report on

155
Roanoke canale
329 || Swedish affairs

368, 384
river described
221 | System-mongers

241
Roman antiquities
63|| Table mountain

110
Rome, account of
156, 173 Talleyrand

128
Rotation of crops

308

implicated in the Orleans conspir-
Royal Bourbon Uni
240

S35
Russia, embassy to
225 || Tariff of the United States

147
Russian emperor's proclamation

84

analysis of 226
Ukase
85 || Thorn, H. trial of

24-1
declaration
320 || Timbers, changes in

333
liberates certain vassals 400 || Time, figure of

224
troops' clothing
128 || Titles

112
tárift
349|| Toledo, Don J. A. defence of, &c.

138
ariny
368, 416|| Torture at Madrid.

350
affairs

384|| Topograpy 63, 96, 223, 225, 267, 282, 283, 310,
offer to Mr. Fulton
384

311, 329, 340
Sambawa volcano

254 || Tree, mammoth
San Fernando lost
63 | Treaty with Algiers

10
Santa Fee taken

312
of Ghent

93
Salt works, Conemaugh

189
Paris

101
Savary, Gen. escape of
416||Tristan D'Acunha

253
Scott, John, l. gacy of, to the poor
414 Tripolitan affairs

142
Seeds, garden, &c.
380|| Tuccoa falls

110
Serpent, blind
270|| Tunis, British treaty with

272
Sewall, cenotaph on
191 || Turkish affairs

356, 350
Seymour, Gen. R. A. governor of St. Lucia 416|| Turnips, how raised
et al. opinion in the case of Bruce, Tyrian purple

306
Wilson, and Hutchinson
207 || Vairin in Kentucky

336
271 || Variations of the compass

239
Shipwrecks on the British shores, causes of 328 Vase to Gen. Jackson
Sicrra Leone destroyed

30-1
208 || Venezuelan affairs
Silks, Portugal probibitions on

312, 361
142 || Vevay described

311
91 || Viper and lamprey

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271

347

Shepherd's,
Ship building

Sinking fund, report on
Skenando the Indian

306
124 || Volcano of Sambawa

254
speech of
283 | Cnion brig, outrage to the

415
341 United States, remarks on the condition of 81

Smithville

United States laws, editions of
386 || Western states, emporium of

266
Vogel, professor, death of
350 || White slaves at Tunis

284
Voyage of discovery

143 || Wilson's trial

142, 158, 256, 335
Wales, princess

320, 352
legal opinion on

207
Wales, Prince, orders
240|| Wilson, H. Esq. consular agent at Nantz

316
reprimand to Bruce, Wilson, Wine, origin of

306
and Hutchinson

320
-, currant, how made

387
War, Jefferson's and Adams' opinions on 307 || Wire bridge

270
Washington, Gen. remains of
65 | Wirt, eloquence described

381
birth place marked 256 Woad or pastel

269, 412
Washington city, expenditures in
90 || Wooden bellows

270
74, arrived at Annapolis 192 | Wood, green best for ships

271
Gibraltar
400 Wood, J. appointed engineer

400
Weather
304 | Wool

263
Wellington's remonstrance to Louis
208 | Worms in an abscess

351
superseded
288 || Zoological disquisitions

168
attempt to blow him up

400

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In early times, light was obtained from the

fuel employed for heat. So in Homer, oil does announced in the prospectus, pot to inter- not appear to have been used for light, which tere in local politics; to make his page'a cool was procured from burning fuel in a kind of and impartial record of facts from week to chafing dish Auxvos; though the Jews and Egypweek, free from all intemperance of con- lians of that day appear to have employed the ment, On great and important national | oil of the rape seed, or of the sesamum, (per. questions, he proposes to give occasionally

Maps our Beni-nut of Carolina.) Plin. XV. ch. a fair and candid synopsis of the arguments

7, 8 Lev. 26. 25 Exod. 6, 3). 6, 18, 19 Odyss.

Indeed in the first stages of society, the light on both sides, leaving his readers unfetter-ll accompanying heat would suggest common

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