Page images
PDF
EPUB

SENATE.

By the arrival of the Milo, at Boston, from Liver. PATRICK SAVAGE, Esq. is appointed British conpool, London papers have been received to the 21st sul in Virginia. of February.

Gen. Rialt, lately in Canada, is appointed Bri.

tish governor of Grenada. The Journals, says the Boston Centinel, are mostly filled with debates in the British parlia. ment, on the well known affairs of Europe. The

London, FER. 21. Yesterday a division took opposition were unusually active and vindictive, place in parliament, on an amendment

condemnbut the ministerial majority, in both houses con

ing the conduct of ministers, proposed by lord tinued overwhelming.

Milton, when the opposition collected all their There is little in these papers on American con

forces. The result was :cerns; but that little is pacific. In a debate (Feb.

For the amendment, 77163 majority for 14th) in the commons, a member said, the spirit Against it, ... 240 S Ministers. of animosity in America would justify an increase

In the lords the division was :-For ministers of the naval force in the West Indies. This call. ||104.-Against them 44. ed up lord Castlereagh who said, “as to Ameri- The British embassy to Portugal, has been disca, if it is said great prejudices exist there against continued ever since it has been known that the us, it must be recollected that great prejudices court intended to remain in Brazil. Mr. CANNING exist here against her. It was, he said, his most

the late minister, is on the return home, and it is earnest wish to discountenance this feeling on said, will come into the administration at the head both sides, and to promote betwecen the two na

of the admiralty. tions feelings of reciprocal amity and regard. The Russian emperor, has ordered 750,000 Certainly there were no two countries whose in suits of regimentals, of English manufacture, for terests were more naturally and closely connect- the clothing of his troops. ed; and he hoped that the course which the gov. ernment of each country was pursuing, was such as would consolidate the subsisting peace, pro- LATE APPOINTMENTS BY THE PRESIDENT AND mote harmony between the nations, and prevent on either side the recurrence of any acts of ani. mosity.”

SAMUEL HAWKINS of New-York, has been ap. Predictions of commotions in France, continued

pointed the ageut on the part of the United States,

as authorized by the treaty of Ghent, for man. in daily refutation, and fabrication. The allied aging the business under the 6th. and 7th. artitroops had left Paris, and the interior of Francecles of said treaty. nearly a month, and yet the progress of tranquility continued uninterrupted.

WILLIAM PINKNEY of Maryland, to be minister The pretended difference between Austria, and plenipotentiary to the court of St. Petersburg, and Bavariri, had wholly terminated.

minister extraordinary to the court of Naples. The English stocks continued high, and the CORNELIUS P. Van Ness, of Vermont, to be a French stocks improving.

commissioner under the British Treaty, for ascerThe proposed marriage of a german prince, taining the boundary line between Vermont and with the princess CHARLOTTE of Wales, occasion- | New Hampshire and the British Territory. ed much joy in England. The prince who is of DANIEL SUELDEN, late of the Treasury Departthe house of Saxo-Coubourg-Saalfield, and whosement, to be Secretary of Legation of the United name is LEOPOLD GEOROE Caristian FREDERICK, States to France. was borne in Dec. 1790.--The princess, who is the WILLIAM R. King, of North Carolina, (now a heir to the British throne, was born Jan. 1796. It representative in congress) to be secretary of the is said to be a love match. The marriage has legation to Russia. probably taken place ere this; and one of the sti. pulations is, that she shall not be taken out of the HARMAN Visgen, of New-York; to be consul at kingdom without her free and full consent. The Bristol, in Great Britain. prince, it was said, would be created Viceroy of EMANUEL WAMBERSIE, of Georgia to be a consul Hanover.

at Ostend, in the Low Countries. Prince TALLYRAND, lived in great splendor and

Henry Wilson, of Maryland, to he consul at popularity in Paris. He is said to be one of the L'Orient, in France. richest subjects in France. He enjoyed the in- Thomas L. M'KENNEY, of the District of Columtire confidence of the Bourbons.

bia, to be superintendent of Indian affairs, vice

John Mason, resigned.
The Ex-King Joseph BONAPARTE, Marshal Grov-
CHY, and Gen. LEFEKRE-DESNOUETTES, are in Phi-

Major Daniel Hughes, late of the United States ladelphia. The Paris papers mention, that a re- || Army, Factor for the United States, at Fort Haw

kins. ward of 10,000 francs had been proclaimed for the apprehension of the latter.

TIMOTHY UPHAM, to be collector of Portsmouth,

N. H. in the place of Joseph Whipple, deceased. Merlin (of Douay) one of the 38 persons order

John F Parrott, to be Naval Officer for Portsed to leave France, as dangerous persons, left || mouth. Brussels in February last, for the United States. Soult, (another of the 38) had gone to Hamburg.

BRIDGES ARRUNDELL, to be Collector of the Letters from Europe say, these proscribed citi-port of Beaufort, N. C. in the place of Henry zens will all be permitted to return to France, as

Cook, resigned. soon as the affairs of the nation are permanently William HAMMOND, to be surveyor of the port settled.

of North Kingstown, in R. I.

No. 9. vol. 1.] WASHINGTON, SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 1816. [WHOLE NO. 9. PUBLISHED WEEKLY, BY JOEL K. MEAD, AT FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM.

or of the other, or of both of the belligerent RATES OF POSTAGE.

parties. We say this was to have been expected The following rates of postage are to becharg

--that these evils were inevitable and we have ed after the 1st day of May, conformable to an act of congress passed on the 9th inst.

reason to bless a beneficent creator, that we On Single Letters.

were not more deeply embroiled in such controFor any distance not exceeding 30 miles 6 cents

versies than we have hitherto been. But the times Over 30, and not over 80 miles

10 Over 80, and not over 150 miles

12 1-2 arr now arrived; the civilized world is now in a Over 150, and not over 400 mijes 18 1.2

state of repose, and the European soldiers, tho' Over 400

25 Double Letters, or those composed of two pieces their military habiliments. We may now venture

clad in the panoply of war, are slumbering in of paper, double those rates.

Triple Letters, or those composed of three to disentangle ourselves from European politics pieces of paper, triple those rates. Packets, or letters composed of four or more

without an offence to either of the two great par. pieces of paper, or one or more other articles, ties, by which the nation has been so long divid. and weighing one ounce avoirdupvise, quadrupleed. It has been said by the members of the fethose rates, and in that proportion for all greater deral party, that the democratic party were enweight.

Ship Letters, not carried by mail, are chargea-deavouring to drive the nation headlong into the ble with 6 cents.

toils of Buonaparte. They said that this monarch Newspapers.

was attempting, under the guise of liberty, the Each paper not carried over 100 miles 1 cent Over 100 miles

1 1-2

subjugation of the civilized world; that he har. But if carried to any place within the state boured dark and mysterious designs, fraught with where printed, whatever be the distance, the rate mischief to the human race ; that he flattered by is only 1 cent. Magazines and Pamphlets.

fair promises, to destroy by force of arms; that Are rated by the sheet.

our own administration connived at such enormiCarried not over 50 miles

1 cent ty, and did every thing in their power to extend Over 50, and not over 100 miles

1 1.2

and to consolidate the tyranny of this man. On Over 100 miles

2 Every four folio pages, eight quarto pages, or the other hand, the democratic party have chargsixteen octavo or lesser pages, are to be consider-ed the federalists with an overweening partiality ed a sheet; also the surplus pages beyond even

for England ; that they were willing to succumb fours, &c. Journals of the state legislatures are to be charged with pamphlet postage, although to any enormity which was perpetrated by that not stitched or half bound.

nation ;

that they beheld with an eye of indifferPostmasters are not to forward pamphlets in the mail, where the latter is very large, or where

ence the impressment of their own countrymen, it is carried with great expedition, or on horse. while they were all alive to the perpetrations of back.

injuries from France; that no alternative remainRETURN J. MEIGS, Jun. Postmaster General.

ed for us, but to espouse the controversy of one, General Post Office, April 16.

or of the other of these belligerents ; that our national independence was implicated in our

making a common cause with Buonaparte ; that THE AMERICAN CHARACTER.

we were reduced to the necessity of fighting It has been the misfortune of our country (and | England, or surrendering up our national existan inevitable one) to have our destinies linked ence without a blow. Without deciding on which too closely with the destinies of Europe. It | side of these important questions, the scales of Was to have been expected that when the whole justice incline ; without entering into all those civilized world was in arms--that three thou- considerations so peculiarly liable to affect the sand miles distance from the theatre of ac- sensibilities of party; it is abundantly sufficient tion that an intervening ocean of that extent

to remark, that the great cause has now subsided, would not have been able to wash from the mind, which bound us 10 the fate of foreign nations, alall our sympathies for the fate of war ; all our lowing the allegations of either party to be true. habits of commercial adventure, and all the re- If the federal party did honestly believe, that collection of all the insults, injuries, wrongs, the molition of Napoleon's power was an event captures, conflagrations, or condemnations of one in which the whole civilized world was so deepVOL. I.

I

ly interested, that demolition has been accom- || doomed to reap the harvest of agriculture, or of plished. The world is no longer in dread of the battle. overbearing arrogance of France. That nation

It is the duty of every patriot to turn the attenis now only a secondary power, and it remains || tion of his fellow citizens home. We have gazed problematical, whether she will not even yet be on Europe long enough-we have participated so blotted from the roll of independent nations. | deeply in the struggles of that country, that we When therefore the federalists state, that they have been considered by foreigners as divided apprehend so much danger from the overbearing || into two great classes, known by the name of Eninfluence of France, it is plain that this plea will glishmen, or of Frenchmen. Never was a fairer not avail them now. As little have the demo- || opportunity presented, than the present, to teach cratic party to urge in their defence, with regard || these haughty foreigners how much they have to any advantages which the United States may || been mistaken in their estimation of the Amerireap, by espousing the controversies of Buona

can character. parte. Such an act would embroil us in hostility with all the powers of Europe. We are now at peace, and the whole civilized world is at peace

LAFITTE. also (if we except the struggle in Spanish Ame- It may not be unamusing to our readers to state rica for independence; the accomplishment of some particulars relative to the character of Lawhich, we pray Heaven, may be speedily ef- fitte, who acted so conspicuous a part in the defected.)

fence of New Orleans. It is well known that We make these remarks not for the purpose of this man, assailed with a band of Barratarianss criminating the members of either party, but to kept up marauding excursions on the commerce shew, that the honest, the independent, and just of the United States. Com. Patterson received of both parties, ought to cordially and sincerely || orders from the Secretary of the Navy to unite. The American ground is now completely disperse this band of marauders, and was open ; there is no pretext now for violent foreign || sent on to New Orleans for that purpose. Be. attachments or antipathies. We have nothing to || fore his arrangements were completed, intelļi. fear, or to hope, from any foreign nation. France | gence was received of the hostile intentions of and England are to us the same as if the frightful the English, and it then became a question how revolutionary explosion had never been. Ameri- || he was to act. Our enemies were then attemptcans now have leisure to form a character, purely, | ing to conquer us no less by division than by distinctly, and we trust, permanently American. arms, The British commanders published proWe may cultivate our own resources, invigorate clamations-inviting the Spaniards—the people agriculture, commerce and manufactories—pa- of colour—the negroes-and, amongst the rest, tronize the arts-penetrate still deeper into the the marauders of Barrataria, to join their standwaste-howling wilderness, and pour all the bless- ard. Lt. col. Edw. Nichols made overtures express ings of civilized life into the deepest recesses of and direct to Lafitte, promising him a guarantee the forest. Our vast inland seas, rendered memo- of his property, &c. if he would join the British rable by the achievements of our naval heroes standard. This wily officer demanded a fort. already begin to whiten with the peaceful wings night to return a definitive answer to his proposals, of commerce. Our native eagle sails serenely and the British officer does not appear to imagine over those mighty waters, but carries no thunder that he was preparing to play a double game: he in his talons. If a period so auspicious—if the flatters him with the services which he intends to present repose of the world is improved, as it | render to the British arms. But the antipathy ought to be, is it too much to hope, that a charac. | which this Frenchman bore to that nation, seems ter purely American can be formed of such mate.

to have answered all the purposes of nobler quarials, destitute of all foreign attachments or an

lities. He immediately dispatched a messenger tipathies ? It is an hour of peace, and an hour of to the Governor of Louisiana with the intellicordial quieting. We are now placed on a large and gence, and tendered his services in the defence of

N.Orleans. He embraced the favourable moment, magnificent theatre, hereafter to become illus

when he was morally certain that his former er trious in the history of the world. This is no idle

rors would be overlooked, to urge his request. speculation ; the enterprising character of our ci. || If his demand was rejected, he could, as the tizens in peace, or in war, renders such an event only alternative left, join the arms of our enealmost certain, whether our countrymen are mies. In the critical situation in which New-Orleans was at that time placed, it did not become For compensation granted by law to the mem. the United States to have more enemies than one.

bers of the senate and house of representatives, Lafitte, therefore, was invited by the Governor of ninety-five

thousand two hundred and fifty dol

their officers, and attendants, five hundred and Louisiena, to join the standard of the United lars, and the deduction to be made on account of States, and should his conduct meet with the ap- || the absence of members or delegates for any part probation of General Jackson, the Governor prom which the days of their absence respectively bear

of the present session, shall be in the proportion ised to intercede with the President, to procure a to the whole number of the days of the session. pardon for him and his followers. Lafitte, on the For the expense of firewood, stationary, printstrength of this assurance, joined the forces of ing, and all other contingent expenses of the two the United States, and peculiarly signalized him. || houses of congress, forty-seven thousand dollars.

For the expenses of the library of congress, inself in the defence of New-Orleans. He was then cluding the librarian's allowance for the year one recommended by the legislature as a suitable ob- thousand eight hundred and sixteen, eight hunject of clemency, and a pardon was thus obtain-dred dollars. ed for himself and all his followers. The above ed States, twenty-five thousand dollars.

For compensation to the president of the Unitfacts are taken from Major Latour's history of the For rent and repairs of the tenement occupied war in Louisiana.

by the president of the United States since August, What we notice the above facts for is to show

one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, three

thousand five hundred and fifty dollars. how dangerous a game is played by the nation

For compensation to the secretary of state, five who endeavours to conquer by holding out such thousand dollars. lures and temptations to desperate men to join For compensation to the clerks employed in

the department of state, being the sum approtheir standard.

priated for the service of the year one thousand The British officers who sought the alliance of eight hundred and fifteen, eleven thousand three Lafitte, was ultimately the cause of his going over

hundred and fifty dollars and fifty cents. to the United States. Had it not been for this partment and in the patent office, six hundred

For compensation to the messenger in said deinvitation, Lafitte would in all probability have and sixty dollars. remained neutral. His hatred to the English | the said department, including the expense of

For the incidental and contingent expenses of would probably have prevented him from contri- printing and distributing ten thousand four hunbuting to the success of their arms: and he clear-dred copies of the laws of the first session of the ly would not have assisted a nation who was at

fourteenth congress, and printing the laws in that moment labouring for his destruction. The news papers, sixteen thousand nine hundred and

thirty dollars. invitation, however, from the English, furnished For compensation to the secretary of the treahim with the means of making his peace with our sury, five thousand dollars.

For compensation to the clerks employed in government, and enabled him to wreak his re

the office of the secretary of the treasury, being sentment on them.

the sum appropriated for the service of the year one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, ten thousand four hundred and thirty-two dollars and

twenty-eight cents. APPROPRIATION ACT.

For compensation to the messenger and assis

tant messenger in the office of the secretary of AN ACT making appropriations for the support the treasury, seven hundred and ten dollars.

of government, for the year one thousand eight For expense of translating foreign languages, hundred and sixteen.

allowance to the person employed in transmitBe it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- || ting passports and sea letters, and for stationary sentatives of the United States of America in Con- and printing in the office of the secretary of the gress assembled, That for the expenditure of the treasury, one thousand one hundred dollars. civil list in the present year, including the con- For defraying the expenses of issuing treatingent expenses of the several departments and sury notes, a sum not exceeding thirty thousand offices; for the compensation of the several loan

dollars. officers and their clerks, and for books and sta. For stating and printing the public accounts tionary for the same; for the payment of annuities for the years one thousand eight hundred and and grants ; for the support of the mint establish- fifteen, and one thousand eight hundred and sixment; for the expenses of intercourse with foreign | teen, two thousand four hundred dollars. nations; for the support of light houses, beacons,

For compensation to the comptroller of the buoys, and public piers; for surveying the coast || treasury, two thousand fire hundred dollars. of the United States ; for making the Cumber

For compensation to the clerks employed in land road; for ascertaining the titles to lands in the office of the comptroller of the treasury, Louisiana; for providing certificates of registry || being the sum appropriated for the service of the and lists of crews, and for satisfying certain year one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, miscellaneous claims, the following sums be, and thirteen thousand three hundred and sixteen dolthe same are hereby respectively appropriated, lars and five cents.

For compensation to the messenger in said office, four hundred and ten dollars.

that is to say :

[ocr errors]

For compensation to additional clerks to be || thousand two hundred and twenty-eight. dollars employed in the office of the comptroller of the and thirty-two cents. treasury, two thousand two hundred dollars. For compensation to the messenger in said

For expense of stationary, printing, and con. | office, four hundred and ten dollars. tingent expenses in the comptroller's office, eight For compensation to additional clerks to be hundred dollars.

employed in the office of the register of the treaFor compensation to the auditor of the trea- || sury, eight hundred dollars. sury three thousand dollars.

For expense of stationary, including books for For compensation to the clerks employed in the public stocks, printing the public accounts, the auditor's office, being the sum appropriated and other contingent expenses of the register's for the service of the year one thousand eight office, two thousand eight hundred and ninety hundred and fifteen, ten thousand one hundred | dollars. and thirty two dollars and sixty five cents, and For fuel and other contingent expenses of the further sum of two thousand five hundred || the treasury department, including rent of the dollars.

buildings now occupied by the department, exFor compensation to the messenger in said | pense of removing the records during the late office, four hundred and ten dollars.

war, transporting the same to the building preFor compensation to additional clerks to be paring for them, cost of furniture for the offices, employed in the office of the auditor, four thou. cases for the fire proof, and compensation to a sand dollars.

superintendant and two watchmen employed for For expense of stationary, printing and contin. the security of the treasury buildings, fifteen thou. gent expenses in the auditor's office, eight hun- sand dollars. dred dollars.

For the purchase of books, maps, and charts For compensation to the treasurer, three thou for the treasury department, one thousand dollars. sand dollars.

For compensation to the secretary to the comFor compensation to the clerks employed in || missioners of the sinking fund, two hundred and the treasurer's office, being the sum appropriated fifty dollars. for the service of the year one thousand eight For cost of vellum for patents for military bounhundred and fifteen, four thousand two hundred | ty lands, printing them, and record books and and forty dollars and four cents.

wheels for military bounty lottery in the office of For compensation to the messenger in said the commissioner of the general land office, sevenoffice, four hundred and ten dollars.

teen thousand three hundred dollars. For compensation to additional clerks to be For compensation to two clerks to be employed employed in the treasurer's office, one thousand in the said office, to write and record the patents, two hundred dollars.

seventeen hundred dollars. For expenses of stationary, printing, and con. For compensation to the secretary of war, four tingent expenses in the treasurer's office, eight | thousand five hundred dollars. hundred dollars.

For compensation to the clerks employed in the For compensation to the commissioner of the office of the secretary of war, being the sum appro, general land office, three thousand dollars. priated for the service of the year one thousand

For compensation to the clerks employed in eight hundred and fifteen, fifteen thousand two the office of the commissioner of the general || hundred and thirty dollars. land office, ten thousand two hundred and fifty For compensation to the messenger and his assisdollars.

tants, in said office, seven hundred and ten dollars. For compensation to the messenger in said For expense of fuel, stationary, printing, and office, four hundred and ten dollars.

other contingent expenses in the office of the secre. For stationary, printing, and contingent ex- tary of war, three thousand dollars. penses in the general land office, including vellum For compensation to the accountant of the war for land patents, three thousand seven hundred | department two thousand dollars. dollars.

For compensation to the clerks employed in the For arrears of compensation due to the chief | office of the accountant of the war department, be. clerk in the office of the said commissioner, || ing the sum appropriated for the service of the year three hundred and twelve dollars and fifty cents. one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, fourteen

For compensation to the commissioner of the thousand seven hundred and seventy-five dollars. revenue, three thousand dollars.

For compensation to the messenger in said office, For compensation to the clerks employed in four hundred and ten dollars. the office of the commissioner of the revenue, For compensation for additional clerks to be embei the sum appropriated for the service of the ployed in the office of the accountant of the war year one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, department, six thousand five hundred dollars. nine thousand dollars.

For expense of fuel, stationary, printing, and For compensation to the messenger in said other contingent expenses in said office, two thou. office, four hundred and ten dollars.

sand dollars. For stationary, printing, and contingent ex- For compensation to the paymaster of the army, penses, including the paper, printing, and stamp-| two thousand dollars. ing of licenses, in the office of said commissioner, For compensation to the clerks employed in the three thousand two hundred dollars.

paymaster's office, being the sum appropriated for For compensation to the register of the trea. || the service of the year one thousand eight hundred sury, two thousand four hundred dollars.

and fifteen, thirteen thousand three hundred dollars. For compensation to the clerks employed in For additional compensation of fifteen per cent. the office of the register of the treasury, being to the clerks employed in said office, on the sum the sum appropriated for the service of the year herein before appropriated, one thousand nine hunone thousand eight hundred and fifteen, sixteen || dred and ninety-five dollars.

« PreviousContinue »