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bered among the principal articles of export? For || of man that property is discoverable, but in man. this trade Norfolk stands almost without a com- An American ruled by this sentiment, which he petitor. A communication directly from Albe-has perhaps never defined, sets as much value on marle Sound with the sea, is attended with serious, the improvement of his faculties, the cultivation if not insurmountable difficulties: the shallowness of his reason, on freely manifesting his thoughts, of that sea-coast where the action of the waves is preserving the opinions acquired by the exercise constantly shifting the sand from place to place, of judgment, as to enjoy in peace the actual pro will perhaps choak up any channel that may be ducts of his industry, or to fructify the yet virgin made for the passage of sea vessels of heavy bur-soil which is to recompense his labours. When an then. And thus, as Norfolk has the capital and American citizen is asked for the ground of his ata fine sea-port, she must enjoy the trade. Itachment to the political constitution of his counwould, therefore, recommend the immediate try, he simply answers, it is my property; this reopening of the Dismal Swamp canal, so as to ply exonerates him from all other argumentation, give it sufficient width and depth to answer that and in fact it appears to me more conclusive than trade.t the abstractions of publicists.

|

I am sorry, gentlemen, that my knowledge of the subject is so limited.

With great respect, &c.
W. J. LEWIS.

M. Cook and Miles King, Esqrs.

to this these to be made.

An act was passed by the legislature of Virginia, subsequent The canal is authorized to be made 40 feet wide, and sufficiently deep for the passage of vessels drawing five feet water. For the completion of this additional work, the stockholders of the Dismal Swamp canal company, are requested to advance 20,000 dollars on their present capital stock, being 20 per cent. each share. If this sum should be insufficient, the law authorizes the creation of new stock, to an amount not exceeding 60,000 dollars. We regret to add, that there is no prospect at present of any thing being done to forward the improvement contemplated by the law; such is the singular inattention of the citizens of Norfolk to their best inter

ests.-Editors Herald

Thus whatever appertains to the citizen, whatever touches his rights, is sacred in the United States. He stalks freely and proudly on his native soil, fearless of the jealousy of malevolence or the stab of an informer. He accounts not for his actions but to that common law which is the property of all; he gives to his abilities, intellectual and physical, all the developement of which they are susceptible; he is happy enough to desire neither change in his laws nor in the condition of his family.

This idea of property, this general sentiment is represented more particularly by the notions annexed to territorial or landed property. The class of American cultivators is the most influential in the United States. It is supposed with reason that they reckon as more important than any other, the right of property, the principal supporter of institutions founded on the same right. Nearly all the cultivators, improperly called farmers, possess experience and information. They hold seats in the legislative assemblies and the councils of Dis-government; this class has produced eloquent orators, irreproachable magistrates, skilful and courageous captains. General Jackson, who distinguished himself in Louisiana by his heroism and his victories, had forsaken his farm to fly to the defence of his country. Washington was originally a farmer.

FROM A PARIS PAPER.

[Translated for the New-York Columbian.] Statistical and topographical description of the trict of Columbia, by D. B. WARDEN. The United States of America have resolved the most important and most difficult problem that has ever occupied the mind of man, I mean the establishment of liberty without licentiousness, and of order without oppression; these advantages result not only from the social institutions adopted by the Americans, but from their geographical situation. They are not surrounded by jealous and restless neighbors; the wars which they have to wage against foreign enemies cannot menace their independence; they seem to live in a region always calm, from whence they contemplate out fear for themselves, the political storms which agitate and overthrow other states.

Montesquieu has inquired into the principles of different governments, and established them with a superiority of discernment which was to be expected from his genius. However, as the great republic of the United States had not yet existed at the epoch when he elevated the human under-neighbours complaining of the least want at the standing so high, it wanted a subject of observa-view of such riches. tion which should have revealed to it a new principle of government, more durable perhaps, and more energetic than all others. I know of no phrase which can better express my meaning than the words spirit of property [esprit de propriete.]ting All the effects which Montesquieu attributes to virtue in republics, are, in the United States, the natural produce of the spirit of property.

Among no other people do we find, in the same degree as with the Americans, a respect so invio-idea lable for the right of property; and I employ the expression in its widest latitude, it is not only out

This consideration, attached to agricultural labors, is not one of the smallest causes of the evergrowing prosperity of the United States. The extensive banks of the Ohio, the vast plains of Genessee, the immense savannas of the Southern states, are peopled with individuals who seek a with-country, with capitalists who think in earnest of the prosperity of their families, such as they obtain by the culture of lands yet in need of clearing, still free, and without misery.

There, as in the time of the patriarchs, a happy old man may see his descendants cover tracts of thirty leagues with their habitations and flocks, and this without abuses or violence, without their

This prosperity displays itself by a progression so rapid, that we must, in some measure, never lose sight of the United States for a single moment, but we incessantly run the risk of estimatheir situation from imperfect documents. All the descriptions of this country, sketched 8 or ten years ago, have nothing more than an interest purely historical; they express neither her riches nor actual power, nor present us with an adequate of her high and approaching destinies. The most recent work on North-America, most worthy of being cited, is that of Mr. Warden, for

many years consul of the American States in France, and already distinguished for several literary productions. But this work, written in English, is to be published in England, and form part of a vast encyclopedic collection. It is to be wished, that it will be speedily translated, and published separately in our language; it is thus we should be enabled to form a precise idea of the immense progress made in America from 1800 to 1815 inclusively, of the population, commerce, industry, liberal arts, sciences, legislation, and public instruction.

The statistical and chorographical description of the district of Columbia, which Mr. Warden has just published at Paris, may be regarded as a detached portion of his labours on an entire view of North America.

ed.

Washington, like Moscow, will rise anew more flourishing than ever, and will not preserve the remembrance of these great disasters, except to display to governments the advantages of peace and the criminal vanity of conquest.

in favor of the sufferers who are drove from their houses and homes.

Four o'clock P. M. our paper now goes to press-people in the rear of the city moving from their habitations-water from the Crevasse increasing, yet great hopes are entertained by many of its being stopped. [Louisiana Gazette.

The district of Columbia would in itself besity. Scarcely worthy of remark, if it did not contain the city of Washington; this city too, if we only regard its population and magnitude, would not appear to merit particular attention. But it is the. seat of the central government of the American May 11. confederation, a government which, by a charac- We are concerned to say that the appearance of teristic trait of its morality and principles, has the crevasse is by no means auspicious. No propreferred it for residence to other cities, the most gress has yet been made in closing it, and at least opulent and populous. Hence all details which one day more must elapse before even the prehave any relation to this city, acquire a genuine parations are completed. In the meantime a vast importance. It is then with satisfaction and plea- torrent rushes through, increasing the inundation sure that we follow Mr. Warden, in all the parti- of the country both above and below. The green cularities relative to the district of Columbia and between the city and Fauxbourg St. Mary is overthe metropolis of the United States. He describes flowed as far as Chartres street, exhibiting as you it as an exact witness and accurate observer, its look from the levee towards the swamp, the likeclimate, soil, culture and natural productions.-ness of a lake. A considerable portion of BourAs to the city of Washington in particular, hegogne and Dauphine streets is under water, which makes us perfectly acquainted with its municipal has also advanced into the upper part of Bourbon administration, industry, commerce, its establish-street. The Bayou road and the rear of Marigny's ments of instruction, its public monuments, and Fauxbourg are also overflowed. Without a wish to the manners of its inhabitants; in fine, a clear and excite unpleasant reflections or presuming to adconcise view of the organization of the central go-vance an opinion as to the practicability of finally vernment of the federate states of America fitly stopping the crevasse by artificial means, we do terminates the description of the city, or seat of say that before it can be effected an incalculable government. degree of damage will be sustained by the city and neighboring country. [Ibid.

In the summer of 1814, this capital experienced great calamities. An English army took Washington and overran its whole compass with torch in hand. The establishments of the navy, the President's house, all the public edifices, among others the capitol, (the government-palace,) which, although not finished, would have done honor to the finest capitals of Europe, became the prey of flames. The damages caused by this conflagration have been estimated at 1,215,111 dollars. All these losses will be speedily repair-point of duration, however distant from the present, equally the middle of eternity?

SCALA

COLI.

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May 10.

The City Council, have appropriated a sum of money for the relief of such unfortunate families as, being obliged to leave their houses in conse quence of the inundation, are in distress for a place of refuge and for the necessaries of life-Persons so situated, on application to the alderman of their respective wards, will be assisted in procuring tenement, provisions and other articles of neces Those of the first ward are invited to call upon Alderman DEPEYTER, at his office in Royal street, between Bienville and Conti streets. [Orleans Gazette.

ON TIME.

It is a ludicrous kind of thought, yet certainly a true one, that Poets and Painters have given us a false representation of TIME, as the measure of duration, by drawing him an old man-they should paint him middle aged; for if he has always existed, will he not always exist? and is not every

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NO. 15. VOL. I.]

[WHOLE NO. 15.

WASHINGTON, SATURDAY, JUNE 8, 1816.

PUBLISHED WEEKLY, BY JOEL K. MEAD, AT FIVE DOLLARS PER ANNUM.

to give our pages that variety we contemplated, but arrangements are making to present them to our readers with matter more interesting. Some circumstances, which we deem unnecessary to explain at this time, have prevented the publication of the Register, hitherto, until several days after its date, but we assure our patrons the evil shall be shortly corrected. It would have been done before now, at any sacrifice, had not the total absence of news rendered it less important.

TO PATRONS, POST MASTERS, AND AGENTS. When the National Register was commenced, a fond hope was indulged that we should never have occasion to blot our pages with a complaint of the detention or irregular transmission of our paper. With a view to realize this hope, neither expense nor pains have been spared in securely packing it up in coarse strong paper, and carefully directing it, in a fair legible hand, to the post offices where it was ordered: and we confidently believe we hazard nothing in saying, that no papers in the United States are better secured against casualities in the mail than the Register. For this we have a double motive; first, the gratification of our numerous and respectable pa-ginal engagement, trons, and, secondly, our own interest. When pa- In this number we insert the Analysis of the tronage was asked from the public, we guarantied Tariff, arranged under the direction of the secre the safe arrival of our papers at the several of-tary of the treasury. This will make references fices where ordered, by supplying deficiences easy, as all articles subject to tariff duty are without extra charge, and which we intend strict-placed in alphabetical order, with the rate of ly to adhere to. The Register has now been in duty to which they are severally subject.

At the close of the volume, gentlemen will please to notify our agents of the numbers which have failed to reach them, who will please to forward such notice to this office, and all deficiences shall be promptly supplied, agreeably to our ori

operation but 15 weeks, and numerous complaints have reached us from almost every State in the Union, arising from causes over which. we have no controul. A gentleman, of known probity, writes from South-Carolina, under date of May 18th, thus:

"I take the liberty of stating to you, that the EIGHTH number of the National Register is the first that I have received. Seven numbers are lacking, which, if I do not get, my volume will be incomplete, and will be matter of regret. I am highly gratified with the numbers I have had the opportunity of perusing, and hope, on the receipt of this, the deficient numbers will be forwarded, agreeably to your proposals.”

It is unnecessary to say these numbers were forwarded at the same time,that others were which go to the same State; and why they should not arrive is unaccountable, unless we suppose that something more than mere carelessness comes in contact with the mail. This we are very loth to do: but the following extract from another gentleman in the same State will probably serve, in some measure, to explain: "There are letters and newspapers comes to this office, the twine and wrapper taken off, and some of them broken open. It is surprising to see how things are carried on, in a Christian country, to this height." This was His excellency William Pinkney, Minister Ple-· accompanied with a request to show it to the post nipotentiary to the court of St. Petersburg, and master general. Further explanation is unneces- Minister Extraordinary to the court of Naples, sary to show that the irregularity of the trans- embarked with his family on board of the United missions of the Register is not entirely attribut-States ship WASHINGTON, of 74 guns, Capt. Creighton, yesterday, the 7th inst. at Annapolis. Salutes were fired from the Washington and from the guns in the harbour. At 11 o'clock she weighed anchor, and proceeded down the Bay with a full press of sail-wind from the west. Mr. King, from North Carolina, goes out as secretary of lo

EMBASSY TO RUSSIA.

able to us.

We take this opportunity to request post masters and agents to inform us of any error in the direction of the Register, coming within their knowledge; also if any of our papers should not be taken up by the persons to whom sent, occasioned by their absence, removal, or other cause.gation, and Com. Chancey to take command of the In a new establishment, and with so numerous a Mediterranean squadron. Our minister, we are list of subscribers as we have, it is almost morally informed, will debark at Naples, and after adjustimpossible but that some errors will occur; and ing our affairs at that court, proceed by land to we shall at all times acknowledge with pleasure St. Petersburg. The best prayers of the nation our obligation to gentlemen who will enable us will accompany her worthy and able representa to correct them. As yet we have not been able tive. VOL. I. P

SURVEY OF THE CHESAPEAK BAY. Commodore Rodgers and Commodore Porter, Commissioners of the Navy Board, accompanied ford of the Ordnance Department, and proper sur. by the Secretary of the Board, Lieut. Col. Bomveyors and draftsmen, proceeded from the Navy Yard at this place, on Sunday the 2d instant, in the United States schooner Nonsuch, down the Potomac into the Bay. The object of this party is to make a minute survey of the entrance into the ticability and cost of defending it by batteries to Chesapeak Bay, with a view to estimate the pracbe erected on the middle ground, and on corres ponding points. In addition to this important object, we understand, the commissioners propose to examine the harbours of Norfolk, York, &c. with a view to select the most eligible position for an extensive Naval Rendezvous. This laborious tour will doubtless occupy them for several weeks. We shall lay their report before our readers as soon as practicable.

ANALYSIS OF THE TARIFF,

OR

RATES OF DUTY,

TO BE LAID ON ALL

GOODS, WARES, AND MERCHANDISE

IMPORTED INTO

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
AFTER THE 30th JUNE, 1816;

As established by Act of Congress of the twenty-
seventh of April, one thousand eight hundred
and sixteen, entitled "an Act to regu
late the Duties on Imports and

""

Tonnage.'
(For the law, see our 10th number, page 147.)

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Articles, all not free, and not subject to any other rate of duty, (see gold leaf,)

15

Cutlery,

Cannon,

China ware,

Bleached, or coloured, (see cotton

yarn,)

Cloth, hempen
Cloth, sail

do.

do.

(After that day 20 per cent.)
Cotton twist,
do.
Cotton yarn,
do.
Cotton thread, do.
do.
Cotton cloths, or cloths of which
cotton is the material of chief
value, (excepting nankeens im-
ported direct from China,) the
the original cost of which, at the
place whence imported, with the
addition of 20 per cent. if im-
ported from the Cape of Good
Hope, or from places beyond it,
and 10 per cent. from any other
place, shall be less than 25 cents
per square yard, shall, with such
addition, be taken and deemed
to have cost 25 cents per square
yard, and shall be charged with
duty accordingly,
Cotton twist,
Pr. Ct. Pr. Ct. Cotton yarn,

25

25

Unbleached, and
uncoloured, the
Cotton thread, original cost of
which shall be less than sixty
cents per pound, shall be deemed
and taken to have cost 60 cents
per pound, and shall be charged
with duty accordingly,
Cotton yarn, bleached or coloured,
the original cost of which shall
have been less than 75 cents per
pound, shall be taken and deem-
ed to have cost 75 cents per
pound, and shall be charged with
duty accordingly,
Cotton piece goods, imported in
vessels of the U. States, which
shall have sailed therefrom, be-
fore the 27th of April, 1816, and
shall arrive therein between the
30th of June, 1816, and the first
of June, 1817, the original cost
of which cotton piece goods, at
the place whence imported, shall
have been less than 25 cents per
square yard, shall be admitted to
entry, subject only to a duty of
33 1-3 per cent. on the cost of
said cotton piece goods in India,|
and on the usual addition of 20
per cent. on that cost,

Except Russian &
German linens,
Russia and Hol-
land duck,

Copper, manufactures of all articles
from, or of which it is the mate-

rial of chief value,

Importations in

Amer. For.

vessels vessels

120

20 20

7 1-2 8 1-4

30

20

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30 30

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Cotton, manufactures of all descrip
tions, or of which it is the mate-
rial of chief value, till the 30th
of June, 1819,

25

*N. B. In all cases where an ad valorem duty shall be charged, it shall be calculated on the nett cost of the articles, at the place whence imported, (exclusive of packages, commissions, and all charges,) with the usual addition, established by law, of 20 per cent. on all merchandise imported from places beyond the Cape of Good Hope, and of 10 per cent. on articles imported from all other places.

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Mats, of flags,
Mustard,

Manufactures of wood, (see wood,

leather, chip,

straw,

silk,

39

29

Harness,

Head dresses, ornaments for
Hangings, paper

Iron, manufactures of all articles from, or of which it is the material of chief value,

Jewelry,

Japanned wares of all kinds, Lace gold, silver,

Gold leaf, and all articles not free, and not subject to any other rate of duty,

15

Glass manufactures others than win-
dow glass, and black glass quart
bottles,

Gilt wares of all kinks,
Grass, mats of

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Manufactures, (see woollen, &c.)

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(see cotton, &c.) (see leather,) Millinery, of all sorts, Mats, of grass,

30

33

30 33

30

133

30

33

7 1-2 8 1-4 7 1-2 8 1-4

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20

20

30

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30

30

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20

39

Laces,

Lace veils, shawls, » shades,

}or

30

30

Leaf, gold, (see gold leaf,)
Lead, manufactures of all articles
from, or of which it is the mate-
rial of chief value,
Leather, & all manufactures there-
of, or of which it is the material
of chief value,
Materials for composing dies, not
subject to other rates of duty,
Manufactures of all articles from
brass, copper, iron, steel, pewter,
lead, tin, or of which either of
them is the material of value,
Muskets,

20

220

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133

30

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30

30

30 133

30

133

30

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8 1-4

33

20

122

7 1-2 8 1-4

22

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133

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39

Perfumes,

Painted floor cloths,
Pickles,

Paper of every description,
Pasteboard,

Paper hangings,
Parchment,

Preserves, (see sweetmeats,)
Rugs, (see woollen manufactures,
&c.)
Senegal, gum,
Salt petre,
Silver watches,

Stones, precious, of all kinds, set
or not set,
Stones, Bristol
Silver, (see articles all composed,
&c.)

39

39.

Shawls, lace, of thread or silk,
Shades, lace, of
Stockings of wool or cotton,
Sail cloth, (see cloth,)

Steel, manufactures from, of all kinds, or of which it is the material of chief value,

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20

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20

22

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130

30 30 30

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30 130

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33

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7 1-2 8 1-4

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30 130

Sweetmeats, of all descriptions, pre-
served in sugar or brandy,
Saddles,
Sticks, walking

Thread, (see lace, lace shawls, &c.)
Types, for printing,

20

Tin, manufactures from, of all articles, or of which it is the mateof chief value,

20

Twist, (see cotton manufacture, &c.

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