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CONTENTS

Pago

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LIST OF PAPERS

The FAR EASTERN CRISIS:

Chapter 1: January 1-April 15, 1936

Chapter II: April 16-June 30, 1936 .

Chapter III: July 1-October 15, 1936 .

Chapter IV: October 16-December 31, 1936

CHINA:

Problem of China's economic reconstruction and the attitude of the

United States and other governments respecting financial assistance

to China. ..

Measures taken by the United States for the protection of American

lives and property in China ..

Opposition of the Department of State to proposed withdrawal of

American Army forces from North China; retention of American

Embassy in Peiping. ...

Attitude of the Department of State on the export to China of arms or

munitions, including military aircraft ...

Problem of controlling the traffic in opium and narcotic drugs in China,

including Manchuria and Jehol . . .

Efforts for the consideration of American claims outstanding against

China . ..

Representations by the United States against the establishment of

monopolies in China

Rejection by the United States of application of Chinese income tax to

American citizens . .

Reservation of American rights in proposed changes for control of pilot-

age at Shanghai

Assistance to Pan American Airways in securing rights needed to extend

its United States-Philippine service to China. .

Attitude of the Department of State with respect to the application of

Chinese laws to American insurance companies doing business in

China . ..

Re-registration of title deeds to real property of Americans in China . .

Chinese censorship restrictions upon American moving pictures in China .

American interest in problems affecting the International Settlement at

Shanghai

1

1936

Jan. 6 From the Chairman of the American Delegation to the London
(34) Naval Conference (tel.)

Conversation with Craigie of British Foreign Office, who

stated he had learned the Japanese and Chinese were negoti-

ating a nonaggression pact, and suggested a nonaggression

pact in the Pacific for the United States, the United Kingdom,

and Japan.

Jan. 7 From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)

(4) Status of Sino-Japanese exchange of views preliminary to for-

mal discussions.

Jan,

7 To the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(4) Transmittal of substance of telegram No. 34 of January 6

regarding & possible Sino-Japanese nonaggression pact; re-

quest for comments and any pertinent information.

(Sent also to the Embassy in Japan as No. 2.)

Jan. 9 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(9) Dissatisfaction of Japanese military with the anti-Japanese

actions and attitude of General Sung and his army.

Jan. 9 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(10) Japanese demands for redress in connection with recent anti-

Japanese acts of General Sung's soldiers.

Jan. 9 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(11) No knowledge of any proposal for Sino-Japanese nonag-

gression pact, and comments regarding the situation.

Jan. 9 From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

(7) No knowledge of negotiations in regard to a Sino-Japanese

nonaggression pact, and comments regarding Craigie's pact

suggestions contained in No. 34 of January 6.

Jan. 10 From the Chairman of the American Delegation (tel.)

(40) Impression of British Foreign Minister Eden that talk of

nonaggression pact is a play for time on the part of the Chinese.

Jan. 10 From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)

(10)

Unconfirmed report of Japanese intention to land troops at

Foochow and Tsingtau.

Jan. 13 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(15) Explanation, by a Japanese diplomatic official, of movements

of several Japanese officials whose activities had aroused appre-

hension.

Jan. 14 | From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(17) Report on local political developments.

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From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

Information relative to Sung's increasingly autonomous

regime.

From the Ambassador in China

Reasons for opinion that a tripartite pact, mentioned in No.

34 of January 6, would not be feasible.

From the Consul General at Canton to the Ambassador in China

Transmittal of secret document concerning the alleged
activities of the Japanese looking toward the establishment of
an autonomous government of "South China."
From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

Advice of progress of Japanese activities and Sino-Japanese
negotiations and conversations.
From the of Embassy in
Sino-Japanese situation, and Chiang's statement in reply.
From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

Information relative to revenue instructions issued by the

Hopei-Chahar Political Council.

From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

Other developments in the Hopei-Chahar political situation.
From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)

Publication of the provisional general principles governing

the organization of the Hopei-Chahar Political Affairs Com-

mission.

From the Ambassador in Germany

Transmittal of a London newspaper clipping relative to an

alleged German-Japanese military agreement, and indications

which support the possibility of such an arrangement.

From the Ambassador in China

Report of Japanese sugar smuggling in U. S. Infantry camp

at Chinwangtao and advice of curtailment in British sugar

trade in Tientsin due to activities of sugar smugglers in North

China.

From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)

Foreign Office press statement in refutation of reference, in

speech of Japanese Foreign Minister Hirota, to alleged con-

currence by Chinese to Japanese three principles vis-à-vis

China.

From the Consul General at Shanghai (tel.)

Report from a local official that the Japanese Consul General

has received instructions to adopt a stronger attitude in dealing

with local Chinese authorities in view of the Nanking Govern-

ment's changed attitude toward Japan.

From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

Comments relative to Sino-Japanese situation in North

China.

From the Ambassador in Japan

Report of numerous border incidents between armed "Man-

choukuo" and Outer Mongolian forces.

Jan. 22

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1936

Jan. 25 From the Ambassador in Japan

(1655) Observations relative to the withdrawal of the Japanese

delegation from the London Naval Disarmament Conference.

Jan. 27 From the Counselor of Embassy in China (tel.)

(24) Information that Isogai,

Japanese Military Attaché, seem-

ingly favors the Chinese Government's desire to have Sino-

Japanese negotiations returned to regular diplomatic channels.

Jan. 27

the Ambassador in China (tel.)

completely alienate the Mongols from the Chinese.

Jan. 30 From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

(19) British Ambassador's report of conversation with Foreign

Minister Hirota, who expressed the hope that China would

ultimately recognize "Manchoukuo.”

Jan. 30 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(40) Report regarding postal and customs revenues; observations

concerning activities of forces along the border of the demili-

tarized zone.

Jan. 30 Report by the Military Attaché in Germany
(14,500) Official denial by Major von Pappenheim, of the War

Ministry, of truth of a London Morning Post report of a

German-Japanese military alliance.

Jan. 31 From the Chargé in the Soviet Union (tel.)

(39)

concern regarding Soviet-Japanese dissensions in the Far

East and recently published reports of a German-Japanese

alliance directed against activities of the Comintern.

Jan. 31 From the Consul General at Harbin to the Ambassador in China

(196) Observations in support of opinion that the higher author-

ities of the Kwantung Army wish to avoid serious complica-

tions with Outer Mongolia and Soviet Russia at the present

time.

Feb. 1 | From the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

(21) Publication of two articles, evidently trial balloons put out

by the Foreign Office, reporting comprehensive political

negotiations involving the United States, United Kingdom,

and Japan.

Feb. 1 To the Ambassador in Japan (tel.)

(16) Explanation to press correspondents that there have been

numerous conferences regarding questions of trade but no

conferences on political matters in the Far East.

Feb. 3

Ambassador in Japan (.)

(17)

outbreak of conflict between Japan and Soviet Union is

possible.

Feb. 4 From the Ambassador in China (tel.)

(44) Advice of various conversations between Japanese and

Chinese leaders regarding the future course of the Japanese

military in North China.

031 emissary who expressed

37

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