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DENMARK, continued. company, corporation, or agent, acting on its behalf, or under its authority, in the purchase of any article, the growth, produce, or manufacture of either country, imported into the other, on account of, or in reference to, the character of the vessel in which such article was imported; it being the true intent and meaning of the contracting parties, that no distinction or difference whatever shall be made in this respect.

Art. 6.- The contracting parties having mutually determined not to include, in the present Convention, their respective colonies, in which are comprehended, on the part of Denmark, Greenland, Iceland, and the Islands of Ferroe; it is expressly agreed that the intercourse which may at present be legally carried on by the subjects or ships of either of the said contracting parties with the colonies of the other, shall remain upon the same footing as if this Convention had never been concluded.

Art. 7.—The present Convention shall be in force for the term of ten years from the date hereof; and further, until the end of twelve months after either of the contracting parties shall have given notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same; each of the high contracting parties reserving to itself the right of giving such notice to the other at the end of the said term of ten years; and it is hereby agreed between them, that, at the expiration of twelve months after such notice shall have been received by either party from the other, this Convention, and all the provisions thereof, shall altogether cease and determine.

Done at London, the 16th of June, 1824.

SEPARATE ARTICLE.—The contracting parties reserve to themselves to enter upon additional stipulations for the purpose of facilitating and extending, even beyond what is comprehended in the Convention of this date, the commercial relations of their respective subjects and dominions, upon the principle either of reciprocal or equivalent advantages, as the case may be. And, in the event of any article or articles being concluded between the said contracting parties, for giving effect to such stipulations, it is hereby agreed, that the article or articles, which may hereafter be so concluded, shall be considered as forming part of the aforesaid Convention.

The present separate article shall have the same force and validity as if it were inserted, word for word, in the Convention signed this day. Done at London, the 16th of June, 1824.

DENMARK, continued.

AdditioNAL ARTICLE.—Their Britannic and Danish Majesties mutually agree, that no higher or other duties shall be levied in either of their dominions (their respective colonies being excepted from the Convention of this date) upon any personal property of their respective subjects, on the removal of the same from the dominions of their said Majesties, reci. procally, either upon the inheritance of such property or other. wise, than are or shall be payable in each State, upon the like property, when removed by a subject of such state respectively: The present Additional Article shall have the same force and validity as if it were inserted, word for word, in the Convention signed this day.

Done at London, the 16th of June, 1824.

Order in Council, carrying the above Treaty into effect. It is hereby Ordered, that from and after the 1st day of July, 1824, Danish vessels entering the ports of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in ballast or laden, or departing from the ports of the said United Kingdom, toge. ther with the cargoes on board the same, such cargoes con. sisting of articles which may be legally imported or exported, shall not be subject to any other or higher duties or charges whatever, than are or shall be levied on British vessels entering or departing from such ports, or on similar articles when imported into, or exported from, such ports in British vessels; and also that such articles, when exported from the said ports in Danish vessels, shall be entitled to the same bounties, drawbacks, and allowances that are granted on similar articles when exported in British vessels.

Order in Council, the 30th of June, 1824.

Order in Council, exempting certain Danish Vessels from

taking Pilots in British Ports. His Majesty, by virtue of the power vested in him by the Act 4 Geo. IV., c. 77, and by and with the advice of his Privy Council, is pleased to order, that from and after the date of this Order, all vessels belonging to the subjects of His Majesty the King of Denmark, and being of less burden than sixty tons, which shall enter in, or clear out, from any of the ports of the United Kingdom, shall be, and they are hereby exempted from taking on board a pilot, to conduct them into or from any such port, in all cases where British DENMARK, continued. vessels, being of less burden than sixty tons, are not required by law to take pilots.

Order in Council, the 20th of March, 1824.

See Order in Council in page 69, abolishing anchorage dues in the Islands of Guernsey, Jersey, Alderney, and Sark, on vessels belonging to the subjects of the King of Denmark.

CONVENTION OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION

WITH FRANCE.

Signed at London, 26th of January, 1826. ARTICLE’1.–From 'and after the 5th of April, 1826, French vessels coming from, or departing for, the ports of France, or, if in ballast, coming from, or departing for, any place, shall not be subject, in the ports of the United Kingdom, either on entering into, or departing from, the same, to any higher duties of tonnage, harbour, light-house, pilotage, quarantine, or other similar or corresponding duties, of whatever nature, or under whatever denomination, than those to which British vessels, in respect of the same voyages, are or may be subject on entering into, or departing from, such ports; and, reciprocally, from and after the same period, British vessels coming from, or departing for, the ports of the United Kingdom, or, if in ballast, coming from, or departing for, any place, shall not be subject, in the ports of France, either on entering into, or departing from, the same, to any higher duties of tonnage, harbour, light-house, pilotage, quarantine, or other similar or corresponding duties, of whatever nature, or under whatever denomination, than those to which French vessels, in respect of the same voyages, are, or may be, subject on entering or departing such ports, whether such duties are collected separately, or are consolidated in one and the same duty.

Art. 2.-Goods and merchandize, which can or may be legally imported into the ports of the United Kingdom from the ports of France, if so imported in French vessels, shall be subject to no higher duties than if imported in British vessels, and, reciprocally, goods and merchandize which can or may be legally imported into the ports of France from the ports of the United Kingdom, if so imported in British vessels, sball be subject to no higher duties than if imported in French vessels. The produce of Asia, Africa, and America, not being allowed to be imported from the said countries, nor from any other in FRANCE, continued. French vessels, nor from France in French, British, or any other vessels, into the ports of the United Kingdom, for homeconsumption, but only for warehousing and re-exportation, His Most Christian Majesty reserves to himself to direct that, in like manner, the produce of Asia, Africa, and America, shall not be imported from the said countries, nor from any other, in British vessels, nor from the United Kingdom in British, French, or any other vessels, into the ports of France, for the consumption of that kingdom, but only for warehousing and re-exportation. With regard to the productions of Europe, it is understood that they shall not be imported in British ships into France, for the consumption of that kingdom, unless such ships shall have been laden there with in some port of the United Kingdom; and that His Britannic Majesty may adopt, if he shall think fit, some corresponding restrictive measure, with regard to the productions of the countries of Europe, imported into the United Kingdom in French vessels; the contracting parties reserving to themselves the power of making, by mutual consent, such relaxations in the strict execution of the present Article, as they may think useful to the respective interests of the two countries, upon the principle of mutual concessions, affording each to the other reciprocal or equivalent advantages.

Art. 3.-All goods and merchandize which can or may be legally exported from the ports of either of the two countries, shall, on their export, pay the same duties, whether the exportation be made in British or in French vessels, provided the said vessels proceed, respectively, direct from the ports of the one country to those of the other. And the said goods and merchandize so exported in British or French vessels shall be reciprocally entitled to the same bounties, drawbacks, and allowances of the same nature, which are granted by the regulation of each country respectively.

Art. 4.—The vessels of any third power shall in no case obtain more favourable conditions than those stipulated in the present Convention, in favour of British and French vessels.

Art. 5.-Fishing-boats of either country forced by stress of weather to seek shelter in the ports, or on the coast of the other country, shall not be subject to any duties or port charges of any description whatsoever; provided such boats, when so driven, in, shall not discharge or receive on board any cargo, or portion of cargo, in the ports, or on the parts of the coast where they shall have sought shelter. Art. 6.—The provisions of the present Convention shall be FRANCE, continued. reciprocally extended and in force, in all the possessions subject to their respective dominion in Europe.

Art. 7.-This Convention to be in force for ten years, from the 5th of April, 1826; and further, until the end of twelve months after either of the contracting parties shall ha given notice to the other of its intention to terminate its operation; each party reserving to itself the right of giving such notice to the other, at the end of the said term of ten years.

The additional Articles which relate to the intercourse with the British possessions abroad, and reciprocally with the colonies of France, will be found in page 262, under the “Trade with the British possessions abroad.”

An Order in Council will be found in page 69, abolishing anchorage dues in the Islands of Guernsey, Jersey, Alderney, and Sark, on vessels belonging to the subjects of His Most Christian Majesty the King of France.

DECLARATIONS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND HANOVER, RESPECTING RECIPROCITY OF COMMERCE.

Signed at London, the 12th of June, 1824. The Hanoverian Government having placed British ships, and all articles imported in such ships, in respect to all duties, whether upon the goods or upon the ships, and in respect to charges and privileges of pilotage, upon the same footing with Hanoverian ships, and the like goods, if imported in such ships; and the said Hanoverian Government binding itself to observe these conditions, and any other stipulations in favour of the shipping and commerce of Great Britain, which are contained in a Convention between his Britannic Majesty and the King of Prussia, concluded and signed at London on the 2nd of April, 1824;* his Britannic Majesty engages to extend to the subjects and shipping of the kingdom of Hanover all the benefits secured by the said Convention to the shipping and commerce of Prussia, upon the principle of reciprocity, which forms the basis of the said Convention.

Done at London, the 12th of June, 1824.

* See this treaty, in page 58.

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