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regret of my country upon the death of such a distinguished Turkish citizen and public servant.” 9

President's statement to the press is as follows:

"I am deeply grieved at the news of the sudden death of my personal friend the Turkish Ambassador, Mehmet Münir Ertegün.

Turkish interests in this country have been ably represented by him for more than ten years and during this period I, along with hundreds of others both in and out of the Government, have come to esteem him as a diplomat of the highest type_kindly, sincere and accomplished. His

personal integrity was outstanding. I am sending my condolences to President Inönü of Turkey, in the loss of such an able servant of the Turkish Government. My own Government feels this loss deeply.”

The Acting Secretary 10 is telegraphing following directly to Foreign Minister: 11

"On behalf of Secretary Hull and myself I send you our deepest sympathy. The death of Mehmet Münir Ertegün has filled us with a sincere and deep sorrow, a sorrow which we share with his hundreds of friends in this country. His kindly and noble spirit and his great ability have given him a beloved position both in and out of Government circles. His loss will not be forgotten. For more than ten years he has represented Turkish interests in the United States with skill and honesty and all of us in the Department of State will miss his many high qualities.” 9

The Acting Secretary's statement to the press is as follows:

"I have just returned from a call at the Turkish Embassy to express my sincere condolences to the family and staff of the late Turkish Ambassador, His Excellency Mehmet Münir Ertegün, who died this morning. I am speaking for all of his many friends in the Department of State when I say that his death has filled us with a deep sense of personal loss.

"For more than ten years Ambassador Ertegün, or Münir Bey, as he was known to his many intimate friends, has ably represented the interests of Turkey in the United States, and his invariably fair dealings and high personal integrity, his great personal charm, and his unfailing cooperation have given him an almost unique place among the diplomats in Washington. Since the death of the Peruvian Ambassador last April, he has been the distinguished Dean of the Diplomatic Corps. His kindly spirit, illuminated by his conviction that the nations in the world not only should but could follow the way of peace, will not be forgotten. He must have taken considerable satisfaction in the fact that American-Turkish relations have been most cordial throughout his tour of duty in this country.

“In the death of Ambassador Ertegün the Republic of Turkey has lost one of its most able public servants."

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9

Message released to the press, November 11, 1944, Department of State Bulletin, November 12, 1944, p. 570.

Edward R. Stettinius, Jr. 11 Hasan Saka.

10

The Secretary, who is absent from Washington, was grieved to learn of the death of his old friend and has requested you to convey in his name a message expressing his personal condolences to the Foreign Minister.

STETTINIUS

[Acknowledgments were made to the appropriate officials by the Turkish President and the Turkish Minister for Foreign Affairs on November 13. In a statement released to the press on March 6, 1946 (Department of State Bulletin, March 17, 1946, page 447), it was announced by the Department that the late Ambassador's remains were being returned with full honors to Turkey on board the U.S.S. Missouri, with destroyer escort.]

THE FAR EAST

CHINA

[For correspondence regarding relations of the United States with China in 1944, see volume VI.]

JAPAN

INITIATIVE OF THE UNITED STATES TO SECURE COOPERATION AMONG INTERESTED GOVERNMENTS ON MEASURES TO LIMIT AND CONTROL PRODUCTION AND TO SUPPRESS ILLICIT TRAFFIC IN OPIUM IN AREAS OF THE FAR EAST TO BE LIBERATED FROM JAPANESE CONTROL

[For correspondence on this subject, see volume II.]

JAPANESE TREATMENT OF AMERICAN PRISONERS OF WAR AND

CIVILIAN INTERNEES 1

390.1115A/1742: Telegram The Minister in Switzerland (Harrison) to the Secretary of State

BERN, January 5, 1944-9 a.m.

[Received 4:37 p. m.] 81. American Interests—China-Civilian Internments. Foreign Office note December 31 states Swiss Consulate, Shanghai, telegraphs that Japanese authorities convoked for December 22 about 150 Americans, British and Dutch who previously exempted internment view health for segregation and departure December 29 to new camp established near Chapei camp.

Several convokees seriously ill suffering dysentery, ulcers on same terms [sic], heart trouble and require constant medical treatment and strict diet. Others had been exempted to care for bedridden. Under the circumstances Japanese action causes worry especially as camp affords insufficient diet, medical care and heat.

Swiss Consulate finally notes that these measures coincide with publication local press reports attributed Japanese repatriates Teia

* Continued from Foreign Relations, 1943, vol. III, pp. 953–1012.

919

Maru 2 to effect Japanese interned American countries received brutal treatment.

HARRISON

390.1115A/1745 : Telegram The Minister in Switzerland (Harrison) to the Secretary of State

BERN, [January 8, 1944.]

[Received January 8—1:34 p. m.] 162. American Interests, China, Civilian Internments. Secretary this and British Legation handed identical informal communications at Foreign Office this morning of which substance follows:

Fontanel : reverting situation described Legation's 81, January 5, reports information he has been able obtain indicates situation camps growing worse: food insufficient, no heating, neither medicinals nor food necessary diet sick made available. Camp Commandants forced obtain food and funds from friends internees. This confirms insufficiency credits made available by Japanese Government for maintenance camps.

Fontanel greatly concerned because requests he made September in concert with Gorgé - for authorization visit camps ignored by Japanese Consulate. Fontanel fears internees have impression that his activity as representative protecting power inadequate. Request American-British Governments be informed Japanese Civil and Military authorities make extremely difficult carrying out mandate with which he charged.

Foreign Office informally inquires Department agreeable authorize Gorgé make representations in such manner as he deems advisable jointly behalf American-British Governments with view to obtaining either release sick persons or improvement their situation in camps. Foreign Office official believes delivery communication Japanese Government from the Department would not accomplish objective.

British Legation telegraphing London requesting approval proce. dure suggested by Foreign Office. Please instruct whether Department concurs joint representatives (representations?] by Gorgé on basis he may determine best.5

HARRISON

? Vessel used by Japan to carry out exchange agreement with the United States in 1943. For correspondence on exchange agreement, see Foreign Relations, 1943. vol. III, pp. 867 ff.

* Emile Fontanel, Swiss Consul General at Shanghai. * Camille Gorgé, Swiss Minister in Japan.

5 The Department approved the suggested procedure in telegram 162, January 15, 10 p. m., to Bern, and notified the British Embassy to this effect the same day (390.1115A/1745).

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