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Honduras:

ANTONIO BERMUDEz M.,
JULIAN LóPEz PIN EDA,

Costa Rica:
MANUEL F. JIMENEz,
CARLos BRENEs,

Venezuela:

CARACCIOLO PARRA PEREz,
GUSTAvo HERRERA,
ALBERTO ZáREGA FoMBONA.

Peru:

CARLos CoNCHA,
ALBERTO ULLOA,
FELIPE BARREDA LAos.
D16MEDES ARIAs SCHREIBER.

El Salvador:

MANUEL CASTRO RAMíREz,
MAXIMILIANO PATRICIO BRANNoN.

Mearico:
FRANCISCO CASTILLO NAJERA,
ALFONso REYES,
RAMóN BETETA,
JUAN MANUEL ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO.

Brazil:
José CARLos DE MACEDO SOAREs,
Oswaldo ARANHA,
José DE PAULA RODRígu Es ALVES,
HELIO LoBo,
HILDEBRANDo POMPEU PINTO ACCIOLY,
EDMUNDo DA LUz PINTo,
RoBERTO CARNEIRO DE MENDONGA,
Rosa LINA CoELHo LISBOA DE MILLER,
MARíA LUIZA BITTENCOURT.

Uruguay:
José EsPALTER,
PEDRO MANINI Ríos,
EUGENIo MARTíNEz THEDY,
JUAN ANTONIO BUERO,
FELIPE FERREIRo,
ANDRís F. PUYol,
ABALCAZAR GARCíA,
José G. ANTUNA,
JULIO Cés AR CERDEIRAs ALONso,
GERVAs.IO Pos ADAs BELGRANo.

Guatemala:

CARLOS SALAZAR,
Joss A. MEDRANO,
ALFONso CARRILLO.

Nicaragua:
LUIs MANUEL DEBAYLE,
José MARfA MoncADA,
MoDESTo WALLE.

Dominican Republic:
MAx HENRíquEz URENA,
TULIo M. CESTERo,
ENRIQUE JIMáNEz.

Colombia:
JoRGE SOTO DEL CORRAL,
MIGUEL LóPEz PUMAREJo,
RoBERTO URDANETA ARBELKEz,
ALBERTO LLERAs CAMARGo,
José IGNACIo DíAz GRANADos,

Panama:
HARMoDIO ARIAs M.,
JULIo J. FÅBREGA,
EDUARDO CHIARI.

United States of America:
CoRDELL HULL,
SUMNER WELLEs,
ALEXANDER W. WEDDELL,
ADoLF A. BERLE, Jr.
ALEXANDER F. WHITNEY,
CHARLEs G. FENWICK,
MICHAEL FRANCIS DOYLE,
ELISE. F. MUSSER.

Chile:
MIGUEL CRUCHAGA TocorMAL,
LUIs BARRos BorgoNo,
FáLIx NIETo DEL Río,
RICARDo MonTANER BELLO.

Ecuador:
HUMBERTO ALBoRNoz,
ANTONIO Pons,
Joss GABRIEL NAVARRo,
FRANCISCO GUARDERAs,
EDUARDO SALAZAR GóMEz.

Bolivia:
ENRIQUE FINoT,
DAVID ALvásTEGUI,
EDUARDo DfEz DE MEDINA,
ALBERTO OSTRIA GUTIÉRREz,
CARLos RoMERo,
ALBERTO CORTADELLAs,
JAVIER PAz CAMPERO.

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Who, after having deposited their full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following provisions:

Article 1.- Taking into consideration that, by the Treaty to Avoid and Prevent Conflicts between the American States, signed at Santiago, May 3, 1923, (known as the Gondra Treaty) the High Contracting Parties agree that all controversies which it has been impossible to settle through diplomatic channels or to submit to arbitration in accordance with existing treaties shall be submitted for investigation and report to a Commission of Inquiry; That by the Treaty for the Renunciation of War, signed at Paris on August 28, 1928 (known as the Kellogg-Briand Pact, or Pact of Paris) the High Contracting Parties solemnly declare in the names of their respective peoples that they condemn recourse to war for the solution of international controversies and renounce it as an instrument of national policy in their relations with one another; That by the General Convention of Inter-American Conciliation, signed at Washington, January 5, 1929, the High Contracting Parties agree to submit to the procedure of conciliation all controversies between them, which it may not have been possible to settle through diplomatic channels, and to establish a “Commission of Conciliation” to carry out the obligations assumed in the Convention; That by the General Treaty of inter-American Arbitration, signed at Washington, January 5, 1929, the High Contracting Parties bind themselves to submit to arbitration, subject to certain exceptions, all differences between them of an international character, which it has not been possible to adjust by diplomacy and which are juridical in their nature by reason of being susceptible of decision by the application of the principles of law, and moreover, to create a procedure of arbitration to be followed; and That by the Treaty of Non-Aggression and Conciliation, signed at Rio de Janeiro October 10, 1933, (known as the Saavedra Lamas Treaty), the High Contracting Parties solemnly declare that they condemn wars of aggression in their mutual relations or in those with other states and that the settlement of disputes or controversies between them shall be effected only by pacific means which have the sanction of international law, and also declare that as between them territorial questions must not be settled by violence, and that they will not recognize any territorial arrangement not obtained by pacific means, nor the validity of the occupation or acquisition of territories brought about by force of arms, and, moreover, in a case of non-compliance with these obligations, the contracting states undertake to adopt, in their character as neutrals, a common and solidary attitude and to exercise the political, juridical or economic means authorized by international law, and to bring the influence of public opinion to bear, without, however, resorting to intervention, either diplomatic or armed, subject nevertheless to the attitude that may be incumbent upon them by virtue of their collective treaties; and, furthermore, undertake to create a procedure of conciliation; The High Contracting Parties reaffirm the obligations entered into to settle, by pacific means, controversies of an international character that may arise between them. Article 2.-The High Contracting Parties, convinced of the necessity for the co-operation and consultation provided for in the Convention for the Maintenance, Preservation and Reestablishment of Peace signed by them on this same day, agree that in all matters which affect peace on the Continent, such consultation and co-operation shall have as their object to assist, through the tender of friendly good offices and of mediation, the fulfillment by the American Republics of existing obligations for pacific settlement, and to take counsel together, with full recognition of their juridical equality, as sovereign and independent states, and of their general right to individual liberty of action, when an emergency arises which affects their common interest in the maintenance of peace. Article 3.−In case of threat of war, the High Contracting Parties shall apply the provisions contained in Articles 1 and 2 of the Convention for the Maintenance, Preservation and Reestablishment of Peace, above referred to, it being understood that, while such consultation is in progress and for a period of not more than six months, the parties in dispute will not have recourse to hostilities or take any military action whatever, Article 4.—The High Contracting Parties further agree that, in the event of a dispute between two or more of them, they will seek to settle it in a spirit of mutual regard for their respective rights, having recourse for this purpose to direct diplomatic negotiation or to the alternative procedures of mediation, commissions of inquiry, commissions of conciliation, tribunals of arbitration, and courts of justice, as provided in the treaties to which they may be parties; and they also agree that, should it be impossible to settle the dispute by diplomatic negotiation and should the States in dispute have recourse to the other procedures provided in the present Article, they will report this fact and the progress of the negotiations to the other signatory States. These provisions do not affect controversies already submitted to a diplomatic or juridical procedure by virtue of special agreements. Article 5.-The High Contracting Parties agree that, in the event that the methods provided by the present Convention or by agreements previously concluded should fail to bring about a pacific settlement of differences that may arise between any two or more of them, and hostilities should break out between two or more of them, they shall be governed by the following stipulations: (a) They shall, in accordance with the terms of the Treaty of NonAggression and Conciliation (Saavedra Lamas Treaty), adopt in their character as neutrals a common and solidary attitude; and shall consult immediately with one another, and take cognizance of the outbreak of hostilities in order to determine either jointly or individually, whether such hostilities shall be regarded as constituting a state of war so as to call into effect the provisions of the present Convention. (b) It is understood that, in regard to the question whether hostilities actually in progress constitute a state of war, each of the High Contracting Parties shall reach a prompt decision. In any event, should hostilities be actually in progress between two or more of the Contracting Parties, or between two or more signatory States not at the time parties to this Convention by reason of failure to ratify it, each Contracting Party shall take notice of the situation and shall adopt such an attitude as would be consistent with other multilateral treaties to which it is a party or in accordance with its municipal legislation. Such action shall not be deemed an unfriendly act on the part of any state affected thereby. Article 6.-Without prejudice to the universal principles of neutrality provided for in the case of an international war outside of America and without affecting the duties contracted by those American States members of the League of Nations, the High Contracting Parties reaffirm their loyalty to the principles enunciated in the five agreements referred to in Article 1, and they agree that in the case of an outbreak of hostilities or threat of an outbreak of hostilities between two or more of them, they shall, through consultation, immediately endeavor to adpt in their character as neutrals a common and solidary attitude, in order to discourage or prevent the spread or prolongation of hostilities. With this object, and having in mind the diversity of cases and circumstances, they may consider the imposition of prohibitions or restrictions on the sale or shipment of arms, munitions and implements of war, loans or other financial help to the states in conflict, in accordance with the municipal legislation of the High Contracting Parties, and without detriment to their obligations derived from other treaties to which they are or may become parties. Article 7.-Nothing contained in the present Convention shall be understood as affecting the rights and duties of the High Contracting Parties which are at the same time members of the League of Nations. Article 8-The present Convention shall be ratified by the High Contracting Parties in accordance with their constitutional procedures. The original convention and the instruments of ratification shall be deposited with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Argentine Republic, which shall communicate the ratifications to the other Signatory States. It shall come into effect when ratifications have been deposited by not less than eleven Signatory States. The Convention shall remain in force indefinitely; but it may be denounced by any of the High Contracting Parties, such denunciation to be effective one year after the date upon which such notification has been given. Notices of denunciation shall be communicated to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Argentine Republic which shall transmit copies thereof to the other Signatory States. Denunciation shall not be regarded as valid if the Party making such denunciation shall be actually in a state of war, or shall be engaged in hostilities without fulfilling the provisions established by this Convention.

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