HISSTORY OF LOUISIANA. THE SPANISH DOMINATION

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 601 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, and admitted as soon as possible, according to the principles of the Federal Constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages, and immunities of citizens of the United States; and in the meantime they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the religion which they profess.
Page 621 - Until Congress shall provide for the government of such islands all the civil, judicial, and military powers exercised by the officers of the existing government in said islands shall be vested in such person or persons and shall be exercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct ; and the President shall have power to remove said officers and fill the vacancies so occasioned.
Page 640 - THE President of the United States of America, and the First Consul of the French Republic, in the name of the French people, desiring to remove all source of misunderstanding relative to objects of discussion, mentioned in the second and fifth articles of the convention of the 8th...
Page 521 - Irresolution and deliberation are no longer in season* I renounce Louisiana. It is not only New Orleans that I will cede, it is the whole colony without any reservation.
Page 574 - AN ACT TO ENABLE THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO TAKE POSSESSION OF THE TERRITORIES CEDED BY FRANCE TO THE UNITED STATES, BY THE TREATY CONCLUDED AT PARIS, ON THE THIRTIETH OF APRIL LAST; AND FOR THE TEMPORARY GOVERNMENT THEREOF.
Page 621 - Congress, unless provision for the temporary government of the said territories be sooner made by Congress, all the military, civil and judicial powers, exercised by the officers of the existing government of the same, shall...
Page 457 - We wish in our turn to descend it without any interruption to its mouth, to ascend it again, and exercise our privilege of trading on it and navigating it at our pleasure. If our most entire liberty in this matter is disputed, nothing shall prevent our taking possession of the capital, and, when we are once masters of it, we shall know how to maintain ourselves there. If Congress refuses us effectual protection, if it forsakes us, we will adopt the measures which our safety requires, even if they...
Page 552 - He believed the assent of each individual State to be necessary for the admission of a foreign country as an associate in the Union : in like manner as in a commercial house, the consent of each member would be necessary to admit a new partner into the company ; and whether the assent of every State to such an indispensable amendment were attainable, was uncertain.
Page 547 - Congress witnessed at their late session the extraordinary agitation produced in the public mind by the suspension of our right of deposit at the port of New Orleans, no assignment of another place having been made according to treaty. They were sensible that the continuance of that privation would be more injurious to our nation than any consequences which could flow from any mode of redress...
Page 476 - All eyes, all hopes are now fixed on you ; and were you to decline, the chagrin would be universal, and would shake under your feet the high ground on which you stand with the public. Indeed, I know nothing which would produce such a shock. For on the event of this mission depend the future destinies of this republic.

Bibliographic information