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interesting, even entertaining style, should tempt the student or lay scader to pursue the subject to greater depths, and this is presumably the object most desired by the author.

W. S. E.

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The LAW OF A MASTER'S LIABILITY FOR INJURIES TO THE

SERVANT. By W. F. BAILEY, one of the Judges of the Circuit Court of Wisconsin. St. Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Company. 1894.

It may be safely said that there is no branch of thc law which has developed at so rapid a pace within the last few years as that which treats of the liability of the master for injuries to his servants. It affords a splendid field for the efforts of the legal literary harvester, as the ripeness of the subject renders it exceedingly interesting. It is pleasant to think that a lawyer and a scholar of Judge Bailey's ability should have been selected for the work, and the wisdom of the selection is evidenced by the very able discussions of the principal cases and the scholarly arrangement.

Chapters I to VIII, inclusive, treat of the various duties of the master to the servant.

Chapters IX, X and XI, of the risks assumed by the servant.

Chapters XII, XIII, XIV, XV, XVI, XVII and XVIII, of fellow-servants.

Chapters XIX, XX and XXI, of contributory negligence.
Chapter XXII, of independent contractors.
Chapter XXIII, of contracts limiting liability.
Chapter XXIV, of contracts releasing claims.
Chapters XXV, XXVI and XXVII, of procedure.

The great body of case law which is annually introduced by the Appelate Courts of the various States renders. complete digesting almost impossible, except when confined within very narrow districts. It is necessary, therefore, for text writers to specialize, taking up some important branch or sub-division of the law and reducing the decided cases bearing upon it to something like a system. But the great difficulty

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what is bclicved to be one of the most scrious objcctions to the code system-namely, the waste of time in the trial of causes which results from the obliteration of the “issue," and the conscquent admission of vast quantities of irrelevant testimony. This is, perhaps, the only adverse criticism of the book that can with fairness be made. All else is unqualified praise—both as to arrangement, analysis and exposition.

G. W. P.

OUTLINE STUDY OF LAW. By Isaac FRANKLIN RUSSELL

D.C.L., LL.D. New York: Baker, Voorhis & Co. .1894.

A layman or a prospective student of the law who wishes to understand the very general doctrines of jurisprudence and to obtain a clear impression of the fundamental principles which regulate the relationship of citizens to cach other and to the state would be well to read Professor RUSSELL'S work as a: starter at least. As the preface states, the book is a collection of forty-cight lectures, “mere summaries of what was much amplified when presented orally," combining the considcration of international law, constitutional law, and civil polity, with the various subdivisions of municipal law. There is, of course, much that applies only to the state of New York (the work is primarily designed as a preparation for study there) but the first fifteen lectures are devoted to a broader field.

The author's style is truly original. It is forceful, clear and cniphatic. But we wish he had not been compelled or persuaded to reduce to such very thin consistency some of the fiftcen chapters above referred to. Thc

process of condensation and reduction has, we scar, impaired the constitutional strength of the subject. This is especially true of "Equality Before the Law" and "Studies in Constitutional and Political History." The titles of these chapters suggest a boundless field of fascinating research. A glance at their contents reveals the very limited extent to which the author takes us.

The work, however, is intended as an outline as we said before, so that the above criticism amounts, to a mere regret. The very brevity of the book, combined with its

interesting, even entertaining style, should tempt the student or lay reader to pursue the subject to greater depths, and this is presumably the object most desired by the author.

W. S. E.

THE LAW OF A MASTER'S LIABILITY FOR INJURIES TO THE

SERVANT. By W. F. BAILEY, one of the Judges of the Circuit Court of Wisconsin. St. Paul, Minn.: West Publishing Company 1894.

It may be safely said that there is no branch of thc law which has developed at so rapid a pace within the last few years as that which treats of the liability of the master for injuries to his servants. It affords a splendid field for the cfforts of the legal literary harvester, as the ripeness of the subjcct renders it exceedingly interesting. It is plcasant to think that a lawyer and a scholar of Judge BAILEY's ability should have been selected for the work, and the wisdom of the selection is evidenced by the very able discussions of the principal cases and the scholarly arrangement.

Chapters I to VIII, inclusive, treat of the various duties of the master to the servant.

Chapters IX, X and XI, of the risks assumed by the servant.

Chapters XII, XIII, XIV, XV, XVI, XVII and XVIII, of fellow-servants.

Chapters XIX, XX and XXI, of contributory negligence.
Chapter XXII, of independent contractors.
Chapter XXIII, of contracts limiting liability.
Chapter XXIV, of contracts releasing claims.
Chapters XXV, XXVI and XXVII, of procedure.

The great body of case law which is annually introduced by the Appelate Courts of the various States renders. complete digesting almost impossible, except when confined within very narrow districts. It is necessary, therefore, for text writers to specialize, taking up some important branch or sub-division of the law and reducing the decided cases bearing upon it to something like a system. But the great difficulty

seems to be, and, in fact, it is the one objection which we can sce to this very careful and conscientious work, that the text writer, in order to make this book of a respectable size, devotes considerable space to the discussion of subjects only indirectly connected with the apparent scope of the work. Thus, we find in Chapters XX and XXI a very lengthy discussion of the doctrines of contributory negligence, which, while very much in order in a work of negligence, seenis hardly proper in a work covering the law of a Master's Liability for Injuries to his Servant. But these instances are rare in Judge Bailey's book, and even though they may be objectionable from a standpoint of a perfect text-book, they are, nevertheless, valuable contributions to the literature of this subject.

The citation of cases is very full and complete throughout, and the index carcfully prepared. The “cxternals" are in cxcellent taste, and we take great plcasure in recommending this work to the profession as a valuable addition to the litcrature of the law relating to master and servant.

JOHN A. McCARTHY,

RESTRICTIONS Upox LOCAL AND SPECIAL LEGISLATION IN

STATE CONSTITUTIONS. BY CHARLES CHAUNCEY BINNEY, of the Philadelphia Bar. Philadelphia : Kay & Bro. 1894.

The substance of Mr. Binney's work exceeds the limits naturally inferred from the title. Without being a great work it is nothing less than a scholarly exposition of the whole question of local and special legislation in this country as it stands to-day viewed in the light of numerous decisions from the courts of many States. It is, as far as we know, the only work upon this at once theoretically interesting and practically important subject.

The first chapter takes up the subject in a general descriptive way under the heading “The Treatment of Local and Special Legislation in England and the United States. Chapter II points out the distinctions between general, local, and special laws. Chapter III is devoted to the essential point of classification (i. e. the arrangement into groups of the individuals who

are the subject of legislation). The succeeding chapters deal with the effect of the restrictions upon local option, and the control which they exercise upon legislative discretion. The 'main body of the work is admirably supplemented by a thoroughly useful descriptive list (Chapter V) of the “ Restrictions Actually in Force in the United States," classifying the restrictions with regard to the subjects affected by them, and containing a reference to the location of the restrictive clauses in the various constitutions.

Excepting the criticism that the first and second chapters might well change places, the arrangement of the book is clear and logical. The work belongs to that class of legal productions which may be described as treatises not without the useful features of the text-book pure and simple. It is of practical value in the preparation of a constitutional brief, as well as instructive to the student.

The notes, index and list of cases referred to are sufficient. The form of the volume is convenient, and the printing excellent.

W. S. E.

PRECEDENTS AND FORMS OF INDICTMENTS, INFORMATIONS, Cosi

PLAINTS, DECLARATIONS, PLEAS, BILLS IS CHANCERY, As. SWERS, REPLICATIONS, DEMURRERS, ORDERS OF COURT, Bonds and Writs, Adapted to practice in United States criminal and civil cases, together with forms and instructions pertaining to the accounts and fees of United States attorneys and commissioners. By OLIVER E. Paris, Assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois. Chicago: Callaghan & Company. 1894.

The contents of this book are fully indicated by its title. It contains 629 forms for criminal cases, 125 for civil and 14 for accounts and fees of United States attorneys and commissioners, in all 768 forms. First are given general forms for indictments and other pleadings, and for complaints before United States commissioners, warrants, etc. Their arrangement then follows the title “Crimes and Offences" in the Revised Statutes : Crimes against operations of the government, elective franchise, official misconduct, against justice,

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