The School Executive, Volume 44

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etc., 1924 - Education

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Page 398 - Thou shalt have no other gods before me. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth : thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them...
Page 10 - Father of light and life ! thou Good Supreme ! O teach me what is good ! teach me Thyself ! Save me from folly, vanity, and vice, From every low pursuit! and feed my soul With knowledge, conscious peace, and virtue pure; Sacred, substantial, never-fading bliss...
Page 102 - Next in importance to freedom and justice is popular education, without which neither justice nor freedom can be permanently maintained.
Page 306 - A murderer takes life, but his deed stops there. A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.
Page 68 - If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.
Page 105 - The authority, powers, and duties conferred and imposed by law upon the Secretary of the Interior with relation to the Columbia Institution for the Deaf and Howard University shall be exercised and performed by the secretary of education.
Page 305 - SECTION 1. The congress shall have power to limit, regulate, and prohibit the labor of persons under eighteen years of age. "SECTION 2. The power of the several states is unimpaired by this article except that the operation of state laws shall be suspended to the extent necessary to give effect to legislation enacted by the congress.
Page 102 - It has failed to establish any public system of education, although possessed of almost boundless resources (the public domain) and, although it is an axiom, in political science, that unless a people are educated and enlightened it is idle to expect the continuance of civil liberty, or the capacity for self-government.
Page 398 - Honor thy father and thy mother. Thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adultery. Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. Thou shalt not covet anything that is thy neighbor's.
Page 413 - If I were asked to name three American books which have the possibility of a long, long life, I would say at once: The Scarlet Letter, Huckleberry Finn, and The Country of the Pointed Firs.

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