Page images
PDF
EPUB

there is certainly need of a new edition of the book Dr. Johnson declared no man ever wished shorter. "Robinson Crusoe" seems to me to be, not so much an allegory of Defoe's own life, as an epitome of his multifarious knowledge, his views of man and God, his strange and varied vicissitudes. It is not only the first great story of our first great realist, it is also in many particulars the consummate product of our first great journalist and of one of our earliest self-trained writers on economics, travel and geography, morals, and theology. It is much more than the epic of the lower class Englishman it has been described as being; it is more than a picaresque story told by an unrivalled master of minutely realistic detail; it is more than a great prose classic, the art of which has been praised by as keen a critic as Poe, and is abundantly manifest to any one capable of making a thorough analysis of the narrative. Despite its lack of humor and of the power of drawing tears from readers avid of pathetic sentiment, despite the absence of poetical rhapsodizing over the beauties of tropical nature, despite the fact that it was written by one of the least inspired poets that ever turned thousands of bad verses, "Robinson Crusoe "holds by the world's great poems through its possession of a large central idea that has never ceased and can never cease to go straight to the hearts of men. It is to Defoe's eternal credit that he first thoroughly realized, consciously or unconsciously, the appeal that the story of a solitary man's triumph over the pitiless and seemingly unsubduable powers of nature must make to that man's fellows. It was he who in the pages devoted to Crusoe's sojourn on his island first put this sublime conception into a literary form adequate to its dignity.

The world realized at once what he had done, and so for nearly two hundred years the bankrupt and spy at whom the wits of Queen Anne's day sneered has been known to lands and peoples that will never name his scorners. It is a good deed to endeavor to widen and deepen his fame by the publication of a cheap edition of all the products of his marvellous pen that the public can be induced to buy. It would also be a good deed if a sympathetic critic would try to relieve his memory from some of the obloquy now resting upon it. He can never be completely rehabilitated as a man; but it would seem that his character might be more leniently judged, his career more interestingly set forth, his genius more adequately and ungrudgingly appreciated.

W. P. TRENT.

INDEX.

Affairs of the Congo State, The, 150.
America's Economic Future in the Far
East, 604.

American Politics, 3, 163, 323, 483.
ANDREWS, CHAMPE S., Private Societies
and the Enforcement of the Criminal
Law, 280.

Applied Science, 57, 222, 379, 539.
Brain Stationary? Is the Human, 305.
BURKE, THOMAS, Physical Deterioration
in England, 449.

City, The Government of the Great, 611.
Civil Government in the "Moro Prov-
ince," 138.

Congo State, The Affairs of the, 150.
Construction, Protection against Fires
and Faulty, 273.

Criminal Law, Private Societies and the
Enforcement of the, 280.
Defoe, A New Edition of, 625.
Drama, The, 412.

East, America's Economic Future in the
Far, 604.

Education, The Quantitative Study of,
443.

Educational Machinery Fails to Yield a
Better Product, Why Our Improved,
96.

Educational Outlook, The, 85, 255, 429,
586.

Ethics of the Panama Case, The, 115.
Finance, 37, 202, 358, 516.

Fires and Faulty Construction, Protec-
tion against, 273.

Foreign Affairs, 19, 183, 340, 496.
Forestry Methods, German and Ameri-
can, 458.

German and American Forestry Meth-
ods, 458.

Germany Then and Now, 467.

GORDY, PROF. J. P., The Ethics of the
Panama Case, 115.

Government of the Great City, The, 611.
HORWILL, HERBERT W., Literature, 70,
237, 395, 553.

Is the Human Brain Stationary? 305.
JOHNSON, WILLIS FLETCHER, Justice
and Equity in Panama, 125.
Justice and Equity in Panama, 125.
KANEKO, BARON, America's Economic
Future in the Far East, 604.

LANG, OSSIAN H., The Educational Out-
look, 85, 255, 429, 586.

Literature, 70, 237, 395, 553.

Low, A. MAURICE, Foreign Affairs, 19,
183, 340, 496.

MILLER, PROF. KELLY, The Negro's
Part in the Negro Problem, 289.
"Moro Province," Civil Government in
the, 138.
Music, 569.

Negro's Part in the Negro Problem,
The, 289.

New Edition of Defoe, A, 625.
NOYES, ALEXANDER D., Finance, 37,
202, 358, 516.

Panama Case, The Ethics of the, 115.
Panama, Justice and Equity in, 125.
PEABODY, W. RODMAN, The Govern
ment of the Great City, 611.
Physical Deterioration in England, 449.
Politics, American, 3, 163, 323, 483.
Private Societies and the Enforcement of
the Criminal Law, 280.

Protection against Fires and Faulty Con-
struction, 273.

Quantitative Study of Education, The,
443.

RICE, DR. J. M., Why Our Improved
Educational Machinery Fails to Yield
a Better Product, 96.

SCHIERBRAND, WOLF VON, Germany
Then and Now, 467.

Science, Applied, 57, 222, 379, 539.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

AMERICA'S ECONOMIC FUTURE IN THE FAR EAST

Baron Kaneko 604 Ex-Minister of Agriculture and Commerce, Japan

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE GREAT CITY

W. Rodman Peabody 611

A NEW EDITION OF DEFOE

Prof. W. P. Trent 625

NEW YORK

THE FORUM PUBLISHING COMPANY
125 East Twenty-third Street

Paris Agency: Librairie Galignani, 224 Rue de Rivoli

50 Cts. a Copy

[Vol. XXXVI, No. 4]

$2.00 a Year

WOLSTAN R. BROWN.

FOR

[graphic]
[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

LAW-MAKERS WHO SHAME THE REPUBLIC, by RUDOLPH BLANKENBURG. This is the fourth paper in Mr. BLANKENBURG's series on "Forty Years in the Wilderness; or, The Masters and Rulers of The Freemen' of Pennsylvania." One of the most amazing revelations of legislative corruption through the influence of corporate wealth acting under the direction of political bosses and a party machine that has yet appeared.

(With photographic reproductions of passes issued in defiance of law by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company to the people's servants. Also, portraits of JOHN WANAMAKER, President CASSATT, and many others.)

Municipal Ownership and League Organization, by WOLSTAN R. BROWN. This is the most thoughtful and thoroughly practical contribution on the subject that has appeared in years. Besides giving a convincing argument in behalf of publicownership of natural monopolies, he supplements his cogent reasoning with a feasible plan by which our municipalities may quickly become the owners of public utilities without any onerous burdens being placed on the taxpayers.

The Quaker and the Puritan. A Thrilling Chapter in Colonial History, by CHARLES F. HOLDER, LL.D.

Is Divorce a Forward or Backward Step? by KATE RICHARDS O'HARE.

CLARA BEWICK COLBY.

A City Administered in the Interests of the People, by CLARA BEWICK COLBY. The talented editor of The Woman's Tribune spent considerable time in making a thorough study of Glasgow's government, and gives us the most detailed and fascinating story of municipal activities of that city that has yet appeared. It is a paper that no thoughtful American can afford to overlook.

Switzerland and Her Ideal Government. A fascinating sketch by O. K. HEWES of the long ward the realization of a pure democracy, and how, and persistent struggle on the part of the Swiss toat last, the dream of the idealist has been realized.

The Second Great Struggle Between Autocracy and Democracy in the United States, by E. P. POWELL.

[merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »