Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Volume 29, Part 1880

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Page 741 - It has lengthened life; it has mitigated pain; it has extinguished diseases; it has increased the fertility of the soil; it has given new securities to the mariner; it has furnished new arms to the warrior; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the...
Page 741 - ... the soil ; it has given new securities to the mariner ; it has furnished new arms to the warrior ; it has spanned great rivers and estuaries with bridges of form unknown to our fathers ; it has guided the thunderbolt innocuously from heaven to earth; it has lighted up the night with the...
Page 741 - ... of business; it has enabled man to descend to the depths of the sea, to soar into the air, to penetrate securely into the noxious recesses of the earth, to traverse the land in cars which whirl along without horses, and the ocean in ships which run ten knots an hour against the wind; These are but a part of its fruits, and of its first fruits.
Page 94 - I ever read with attention. It opened to me a new world of thought and enjoyment; invested things before almost unnoticed with the highest interest ; fixed my mind on the study of nature, and caused me to resolve at the time of reading it that I would immediately commence to devote my life to the acquisition of knowledge.
Page 771 - Technology, for the purpose of instituting and maintaining a society of arts, a museum of arts, and a school of industrial science, and aiding generally, by suitable means, the advancement, development and practical application of science in connection with arts, agriculture, manufactures and commerce...
Page 690 - ... private parts severed and indecently placed on the person; eyes, ears, mouth, and arms penetrated with spear-heads, sticks, and arrows; ribs slashed to separation with knives; skulls severed in every form, from chin to crown; muscles of calves, thighs, stomach, breast, back, arms, and cheek taken out. Punctures upon every sensitive part of the body, even to the soles of the feet and palms of the hand. All this only approximates to the whole truth.
Page 571 - Lakes was accomplished, and various circulars were sent out in contemplation of the preparation of monographic reports upon the special branches of the fisheries, some of which have already been published. In 1877, the Commissioner and his staff were summoned to Halifax to serve as witnesses and experts before the Halifax Fishery Commission, then charged with the settlement of the amount of compensation to be paid by the United States for the privilege of participating in the fisheries of the Provinces....
Page 92 - ... a quick and sagacious penetration into the true essence of all the objects of our contemplation. This, I think, can rarely exist without the concomitancy of judgment, for how we can be said to have discovered the true essence of two things, without discerning their difference, seems to me hard to conceive. Now this last is the undisputed province of judgment; and yet some few men of wit have agreed...
Page 80 - If a wire, connected at both extremities with a galvanometer, be coiled in the form of a helix around a magnet, no current of electricity takes place in it. This is an experiment which has been made by various persons hundreds of times, in the hope of evolving electricity from magnetism...
Page 697 - ... as I say, the earliest record in the history of communal or democratic institutions in the Alps dates in the year 955, the middle of the tenth century, and the account of the Germans of Tacitus was written at the beginning of the second century, and there is no evidence to establish the existence of democratic institutions during the intermediate time, there is a gap of eight and a half centuries in the history of those institutions ; and you will agree with me, I am sure, when I say that their...

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