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or service is contracted for into the United States, shall be utterly void and of no effect.1

AUTHORIZING PAYMENT TO INFORMER IN CASES OF VIOLATION OF CONTRACTLABOR LAW.

[Act of October 19, 1888 (25 Stat. L., 566).]

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SECTION 1. That the act approved February twentysixth, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, entitled “An act to prohibit the importation and migration of foreigners and aliens under contract or agreement to perform labor in the United States, its Territories, and the District of Columbia," be, and the same is hereby, amended so as to authorize the Secretary of Labor to pay to an informer who furnishes original information that the law has been violated, such a share of the penalties recovered as he may deem reasonable and just, not exceeding fifty per centum, where it appears that the recovery was had in consequence of the information thus furnished.

ESTABLISHING THE OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF IMMIGRATION.

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[Act of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. L., 1084).]

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SEC. 7. That the office of Superintendent of Immigration is hereby created and established, and the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, is authorized and directed to appoint such officer, whose salary shall be four thousand dollars per annum, payable monthly. The Superintendent of Immigration shall be an officer in the Department of Labor, under the control and supervision of the Secretary of Labor, to whom he shall make annual reports in writing of the transactions of his office, together with such special reports, in writing, as the Secretary of Labor shall require. The Secretary shall provide the superintendent with a suitably furnished office in the city of Washington, and with such books of record and facilities for the discharge of the duties of his office as may be necessary. He shall have a chief clerk at a salary of two thousand dollars per annum, and two first-class clerks.2

AUTHORIZING THE PRESIDENT TO SUSPEND IMMIGRATION FROM COUNTRIES IN WHICH CHOLERA OR OTHER INFECTIOUS OR CONTAGIOUS DISEASES EXIST.

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SEC. 7. That whenever it shall be shown to the satisfaction of the President that by reason of the existence of cholera, or other infectious or contagious diseases, in a foreign country there is serious danger of the introduction of the same into the United States, and that notwithstanding the quarantine defense this danger is so increased by the introduction of persons or property from such country that a suspension of the right to introduce the same is demanded, in the interest of the public health, the President shall have power to prohibit, in whole or in part, the introduction of persons and prop

1 See secs. 3, 5, 6, and 7, act of Feb. 5, 1917.

2 See sec. 1, act Mar. 2, 1895, and sec. 23, act Feb. 5, 1917.

erty from such countries or places as he shall designate and for such period of time as he may deem necessary.

REQUIRING STEAMSHIP OR TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES TO POST COPIES OF IMMIGRATION LAW IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

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SEC. 8. That all steamship or transportation companies, and other owners of vessels, regularly engaged in transporting alien immigrants to the United States, shall twice a year file a certificate with the Secretary of Labor that they have furnished to be kept conspicuously exposed to view in the office of each of their agents in foreign countries authorized to sell immigrant tickets, a copy of the law of March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and of all subsequent laws of this country relative to immigration, printed in large letters, in the language of the country where the copy of the law is to be exposed to view, and that they have instructed their agents to call the attention thereto of persons contemplating emigration before selling tickets to them; and in case of the failure for sixty days of any such company or any such owners to file such a certificate, or in case they file a false certificate, they shall pay a fine of not exceeding five hundred dollars, to be recovered in the proper United States court, and said fine shall also be a lien upon any vessel of said company or owners found within the United States.1

AUTHORIZING APPOINTMENT OF COMMISSIONERS OF IMMIGRATION.

[Act of August 18, 1894 (28 Stat. L., 372).]

SECTION 1. The commissioners of immigration at the several ports shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to hold their offices for the term of four years, unless sooner removed, and until their successors are appointed; and nominations for such offices shall be made to the Senate by the President as soon as practicable after the passage of this act.

CHANGING TITLE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF IMMIGRATION TO COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

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That the Superintendent of Immigration shall hereafter be designated as Commissioner General of Immigration, and in addition to his other duties shall have charge, under the Secretary of Labor, of the administration of the alien contract-labor laws, etc.2

1 See Rule 32 for time of filing.

2 See sec. 7, act Mar. 3, 1891, and sec. 23, act Feb. 5, 1917.

PLACING THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE CHINESE-EXCLUSION LAWS IN CHARGE OF THE COMMISSIONER GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

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And hereafter the Commissioner General of Immigration, in addition to his other duties, shall have charge of the administration of the Chinese-exclusion law and of the various acts regulating immigration into the United States, its Territories, and the District of Columbia, under the supervision and direction of the Secretary of Labor.

REGULATING ADMISSION OF CHINESE AND OTHER ALIENS UNDER CONTRACT IF ENGAGED IN INSTALLING OR CONDUCTING EXHIBITS, ETC.

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SEC. 3. That nothing in the provisions of this act or any other act shall be construed to prevent, hinder, or restrict any foreign exhibitor, representative, or citizen of any foreign nation, or the holder, who is a citizen of any foreign nation, of any concession or privilege from any fair or exposition authorized by act of Congress from bringing into the United States, under contract, such mechanics, artisans, agents, or other employees, natives of their respective foreign countries, as they or any of them may deem necessary for the purpose of making preparation for installing or conducting their exhibits or of preparing for installing or conducting any business authorized or permitted under or by virtue of or pertaining to any concession or privilege which may have been or may be granted by any said fair or exposition in connection with such exposition, under such rules and regulations as the Secretary of Labor may prescribe, both as to the admission and return of such person or persons.

AUTHORIZING REFUND OF HEAD TAX.

[Act of February 3, 1905 (33 Stat. L., 684).]

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION.

Provided, That the Commissioner General of Immigration, with the approval of the Secretary of Labor, shall have power to refund head tax heretofore and hereafter collected under section one of the immigration act approved March third, nineteen hundred and three, upon presentation of evidence showing conclusively that such collection was erroneously made.1

1 See Rule 1. In the act of Mar. 4, 1911, making appropriation for the conduct of the Immigration Service (36 Stat. L., 1363, 1442) these refunds are authorized to be made only upon presentation of evidence showing conclusively that collection was made through error of Government officers."

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CHARGING THE OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL GOVERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS WITH THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE IMMIGRATION LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES THEREIN.

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SEC. 6. That the immigration laws of the United States in force in the Philippine Islands shall be administered by the officers of the general government thereof designated by appropriate legislation of said government, and all moneys collected under said laws as duty or head tax on alien immigrants coming into said islands shall not be covered into the general fund of the Treasury of the United States, but shall be paid into the treasury of said islands to be used and expended for the government and benefit of said islands.

AUTHORIZING PAYMENT IN ADVANCE FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR PUBLICATIONS. [Act of March 3, 1905 (33 Stat. L., 1156).]

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Provided, That the annual subscriptions for publications for use in the Immigration Service at large may be paid in advance.

CONCERNING PASSPORTS, EXPATRIATION, REPATRIATION, AND CITIZENSHIP OF MARRIED WOMEN AND OF CHILDREN.1

[Act of March 2, 1907 (34 Stat. L., 1228).]

SECTION 1. That the Secretary of State shall be authorized, in his discretion, to issue passports to persons not citizens of the United States as follows: Where any person has made a declaration of intention to become such a citizen as provided by law and has resided in the United States for three years a passport may be issued to him entitling him to the protection of the Government in any foreign country: Provided, That such passport shall not be valid. for more than six months and shall not be renewed, and that such passport shall not entitle the holder to the protection of this Government in the country of which he was a citizen prior to making such declaration of intention.

SEC. 2. That any American citizen shall be deemed to have expatriated himself when he has been naturalized in any foreign State in conformity with its laws, or when he has taken an oath of allegiance to any foreign State.

When any naturalized citizen shall have resided for two years in the foreign State from which he came, or for five years in any other foreign State it shall be presumed that he has ceased to be an American citizen, and the place of his general abode shall be deemed his place of residence during said years: Provided, however, That such presumption may be overcome on the presentation of satisfactory evidence to a diplomatic or consular officer of the United States, under such rules and regulations as the Department of State may prescribe: And provided also, That no American citizen shall be allowed to expatriate himself when this country is at war.

SEC. 3. That any American woman who marries a foreigner shall take the nationality of her husband. At the termination of the

1 See act of Oct. 5, 1917, p. 96.

2 This provision is constitutional and means exactly what it says (McKenzie v. Hare, 239 U. S., 299).

marital relation she may resume her American citizenship, if abroad, by registering as an American citizen within one year with a consul of the United States, or by returning to reside in the United States, or, if residing in the United States at the termination of the marital relation, by continuing to reside therein.

SEC. 4. That any foreign woman who acquires American citizenship by marriage to an American shall be assumed to retain the same after the termination of the marital relation if she continues to reside in the United States, unless she makes formal renunciation thereof before a court having jurisdiction to naturalize aliens, or if she resides abroad she may retain her citizenship by registering as such before a United States consul within one year after the termination of such marital relation.

SEC. 5. That a child born without the United States of alien parents shall be deemed a citizen of the United States by virtue of the naturalization of or resumption of American citizenship by the parent: Provided, That such naturalization or resumption takes place during the minority of such child: And provided further, That the citizenship of such minor child shall begin at the time such minor child begins to reside permanently in the United States.

SEC. 6. That all children born outside the limits of the United States who are citizens thereof in accordance with the provisions of section nineteen hundred and ninety-three of the Revised Statutes of the United States 1 and who continue to reside outside the United States shall, in order to receive the protection of this Government, be required upon reaching the age of eighteen years to record at an American consulate their intention to become residents and remain citizens of the United States and shall be further required to take the oath of allegiance to the United States upon attaining their majority.

SEC. 7. That duplicates of any evidence, registration, or other acts required by this act shall be filed with the Department of State for record.

REPEALING LAW ESTABLISHING THE IMMIGRANT FUND.

[Extract from the sundry civil appropriation act approved March 4, 1909 (under caption "Public Health Service," 35 Stat. L., 969).]

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In all, one million two hundred and sixty-six thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars, which shall include the amount necessary for the medical inspection of aliens, as required by section seventeen of the act of Congress approved February twentieth, nineteen hundred and seven, and the provision of said section of said act requiring the reimbursement by the immigration fund for said expenses is hereby repealed."

RELATING TO OUTWARD ALIEN MANIFESTS ON VESSELS BOUND TO CANADA OR MEXICO.

[Act approved March 4, 1909 (35 Stat. L., 1060).]

SECTION 1. That until the provisions of section twelve of the immigration act of February twentieth, nineteen hundred and seven,

1 Sec. 1993, R. S., reads as follows: "All children heretofore born or hereafter born out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States, whose fathers were or may be at the time of their birth citizens thereof, are declared to be citizens of the United States; but the rights of citizenship shall not descend to children whose fathers never resided in the United States."

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