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has been made acquainted with the situa- , and extraordinary machine had wound up tion of the inhabitants of La Vendée and the whole of that extensive einpire, by the Chouans, as well as from the Paris all the men who were put in a state of renewspapers. They will do well to conquisition, and by all the meretricious treasider, whether the French government sure that was amassed ; if so many causes can have any degree of confidence, that operating so long, the effects were not to they can reap the least advantage from cease as immediately as the causes. The that union. The advantages of the peace effects in their operation survive the in that quarter have been entirely in fa- causes : but have the French acquired vour of La Vendée and Britanny, and not fresh vigour? Whoever has taken any of the republic; the inhabitants have pains to look at the number and efforts of gained by the treaty, and lost nothing. their armies, and state of the provisions The republic has no right to any accession and magazines, and attends to the manner of strength from this district of the king, in which requisitions have been carried on; dom. Were they subject to requisitions? whoever reads the accounts the members or did they furnish recruits for the army? of the Convention give of themselves ; or did they increase the treasure of the whoever reads their speeches ; whoever country? By the articles of their submis- trusts to their own account of themselves ; sion to the laws of the republic, if they -- these all prove that the vigour and exare reported truly, they are in fact an ertion of that country have been evidently independent government, from which diminishing. In the next place, look at what are called patriots are excluded. the state of their assignats, which for a The state of La Vendée was directly the long time has been the subject of

a great reverse of that of Holland; and if that deal of anxious attention to the Convencountry was not an accession of strength tion. They have been employed almost to the republic, is it not a confession of in a perpetual contest about two things, the weakness of the government, that to make a constitution, and to raise their they found themselves under the neces- credit, by preventing an unlimited numsity, notwithstanding all their splendid ber of assignats entering into circulation. success, to enter into such a treaty as a They therefore passed a decree to withsovereign would never have entered into draw a certain number of them to raise but from necessity ?

their credit. The nominal value of assigThere is another circumstance which nats was only 25l. per cent. At present has been relied upon, and which I must they are somewhat less than 5l. per cent. not pass over in silence. Among other Their expenditure is incredible ; last events of the day, we see that Holland month it amounted to twenty-seven miland France have entered into an alliance; lions sterling, which is more than is wanted and that Holland is to furnish France with by Great Britain in the course of a year. twelve ships of the line, and eighteen fri. This expense amounts to three hundred gates. The present state of Holland and twenty-four millions sterling per anmakes that circumstance more favourable num, which exceeds the whole national for this country than we had reason to ex- debt of Great Britain. The commerce pect it would have been when Holland was of that country is totally extinguished, over-run by the French.

and a portion of bankruptcy mixes itself The question is, whether the state of with every transaction. The next article France is not so weak; whether the dis- is the price of provisions, respecting tractions and disturbances of the country, which I have received a great deal of auand the discontents of the people, are not thentic information within these few days, 80 great, as to be likely to lead to some indeed I may say within these few hours; change or new order of things, more fa- and the price of provisions is so very high, vourable than any that has hitherto ap- and scarcity prevails to such a degree, as peared? First, as to the weakness of must stop all great and extensive operaFrance. We have been told by the right tions. In the next place, I doubt very hon. gentleman, that there was no appear- much whether the provisions for the ance in France of the relaxation of its ef- French army and navy will in future be so forts; that the reign of terror ended with regularly supplied as they formerly have the month of July last; and subsequent been. I have accounts of provisions being to that period they have been as success. re-landed from on board some of the ships ful as ever. But surely it is not very at Brest; and the city of Paris has been wonderful if the operations of that great supplied by pittances from the army on (VOL. XXXII.]

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the Rhine. Expressions of discontent | have trespassed too long on the patience are not confined to individuals, but are ge of the House. I conclude by observing neral, and such as come home to the door again, that I have to hope for a more faof every individual in France. What will vourable order of things, and I have no be the effect of this complicated pressure, reason to be satisfied with any attempt at how long it may be continued, or what negociation at this moment; but by a order of things may ultimately rise out of vigorous prosecution of the war for a it, I shall not pretend to say. But I short time longer, we have every reasonthink it may produce, and probably at no able prospect that we shall be able to progreat distance of time, some new order of cure for ourselves a solid, permanent, and things, more friendly to a general pacifi honourable peace. cation, and to a regular intercourse with Mr. Wilberforce, in reply, combated the the other established powers of Europe. charge of inconsistency: He had, it was Such is the genuine prospect for all the true, supported the war ; but a change of countries of Europe, for an order of circumstances made him now wish to terthings more satisfactory than we have seen minate it. He did not make his present at any former period. It is owing to your motion from any love of French principles

in which they are unequal, that they would Pitt's opinion, and though it might have willingly accept of peace. But because great weight in forming his judgment, you have such a prospect at this moment, yet that judgment when once formed, you are by no means certain that a safe he could not give up, out of respect and honourable peace could be obtained. to him, whatever confidence he might That is, at this moment, premature; a place in his wisdom or integrity. How. continuance of your perseverance some ever his motion might terminate he time longer, will in all probability produce had the satisfaction to think that he had that happy effect.

done his duty, and was not answerable for Compare the situation and resources of the event. this country, feeling for the burthens of The question being put, “ That the the country, which must be felt by the other orders of the day be now read;" the poor and industrious to a certain extent, House divided : and deploring their necessity, as they

Tellers. must obstruct the increasing wealth of the country. Look also at the manufac. YEAS

ŞMr. John Smith

201 tures and trade and revenue, and

Mr. Jenkinson

compare it with the expense of the war. Compare

Mr. Bankes

86 the annual expenditure of twenty or twenty-five millions sterling, to the enor- So it was resolved in the affirmative. mous sum of twenty-seven millions sterling per month, or three hundred and Protest against the passing of the Bill for twenty-four millions per annum, the sum augmenting the Royal Artillery out of the yearly expended by France. After you Militia.] May 28. The following Protest have made these comparisons, tell me against the passing of this Bill was entere whether you will lay aside your exertions, on the Journals : under the peculiar circumstances in which “ Dissentient, you are now placed. You have laid on 1. “ Because the honourable footing taxes unprecedented in their amount, but upon which the militia was established, at the same time baving the satisfaction to and has hitherto subsisted, is, as far as reknow that they are borne by the inhabi- lates to the augmenting the Royal Artiltants of this country without any ma- lery, undermined by this bill, inasmuch as terial severe pressure. You are pro- it makes the militia a fund for the supply, vided therefore with the most ample and and a drill for the accommodation of anoliberal supplies for the present campaign. ther corps, inasmuch as it reduces this But is that the case with France ? No. constitutional force below the numbers Every month, every week, is an additional covenanted by the country to be always strain of the new machine, and they are kept complete ; and inasmuch as it supnot provided with any of that enormous plies the deficiencies it creates, not in the expense which I have mentioned, but regular and creditable manner by which must raise it all by forced means, by re- the militia is constitutionally to be supquisitions, by robbery, and plunder. I plied, and supplied to a certainty, but by

Noes Mr. Jekyll

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the means, uncertain in their operation present as to the expediency of securing by which it is constitutionally provided in to ourselves in the way proposed by this express terms that it shall not be sup- convention, the co-operation of so great a plied.

military power as the Emperor. The 2. “ Because upon the allegation of the House had already decided on that point. present conjuncture, it establishes this They had, however, reserved to themselves measure without any express period to its when the conditions should be laid before duration, and without any clause against them, to judge both as to the security ofthe precedent.

fered for the assistance, to the extent to 3. “ Because at a moment when the which it had been stipulated, and for the temper of the times, and our personal repayment of the sums advanced. When knowledge of late events in some corps, the message was originally brought down seem particularly to recommend a vigi. it was doubtful whether, with a view lance in the preservation of discipline and to a larger sum, still more extensive cosubordination, this bill, in a most extra- operation might not have been required. ordinary and unprecedented manner, re- The advances that had been already Jaxes the authority of the commanding made went to the exceedings above the officers over the objects of it, by suggest four millions ; they amounted to about ing to the latter a method which at any 550,0001. Every precaution had been time, &c. on any motive entitles them to taken that could tend to render the transtheir discharge.'

action safe. The security for repayment 4. “ Because the several circumstances was, first, a general engagement to pay; of disappointment as to the strength of next, a mortgage on the Emperor's here. their regiments, and of degradation by ditary revenues, to be recovered accordthe involuntary removal of their selected ing to the laws of that country, and a deand most instructed men, by the replacing posit of actions on the bank of Vienna. of them in a less certain and less credi- In case of non-payment, the sum to be table manner, and by converting the regi- made good by this country. But the ments into a recruiting fund for another committee would carry along with them corps, form an impolitic and undeserved that we were guarantees for only a half return to such militia officers (and it has yearly dividend on the accidental failure been admitted in the debates on this bill of payment. A considerable delay had that there are many such) as have merit | taken place, which had been full of anxiety with the public.- And

to those concerned in the speculation, as “I conceive it the more necessary to they were obliged to have their money in mark my disapprobation, and express my readiness. Gentlemen on the other side apprehension of the consequences of this had formerly stated, that the transaction innovation, as I know the militia contains did not present a very advantageous prosa fund for recruiting not only the artillery pect to the subscribers. Fortunately the but every other corps in his majesty's ser- reverse was the case. He concluded with vice, much too good not to be ardently moving, " That it is the opinion of this coveted, and (however the intention committee, that provision be made for be disclaimed at present) [fear re- guaranteeing the payment of the dividends sorted to (as I am sure it may be upon on a loan of 4,600,0001., on account of the same reasoning), when parliament the Emperor of Germany conformably to shall have once notified the principle of the said convention.” making the militia subservient to the effi- Mr. For said, that when this business ciency of other corps.

was before the House on a former day, (Signed)

« RADNOR." they were told that four millions were to

be granted to the Emperor, on condition Debate in the Commons on the Loan to of his providing 200,000 men for the the Emperor of Germany.] May 28. The common cause, as it was termed, but House having resolved itself into a com- that if he should provide a larger army, mittee of the whole House, to which the there should be no objection on our part Convention between his Majesty and the to granting him the sum of six millions ; Emperor* was refered,

and it was added, that the Emperor had Mr. Pitt said, that it did not occur to received some of this money in part of the him to be necessary to say any thing at whole loan; and at that time it was not

known how the proposals would be accept* See Vol. 31, p. 1558.

ed at Vienna. The fact now was, that he

at any

the Rhine. Expressions of discontent have trespassed too long on the patience are not confined to individuals, but are ge- of the House. I conclude by observing neral, and such as come home to the door again, that I have to hope for a more faof every individual in France. What will vourable order of things, and I have no be the effect of this complicated pressure, reason to be satisfied with any attempt at how long it may be continued, or what negociation at this moment; but by a order of things may ultimately rise out of vigorous prosecution of the war for a it, I shall not pretend to say. But I short time longer, we have every reasonthink it may produce, and probably at no able prospect that we shall be able to progreat distance of time, some new order of cure for ourselves a solid, permanent, and things, more friendly to a general pacifi honourable peace. cation, and to a regular intercourse with Mr. Wilberforce, in reply, combated the the other established powers of Europe. charge of inconsistency: He had, it was Such is the genuine prospect for all the true, supported the war ; but a change of countries of Europe, for an order of circumstances made him now wish to terthings more satisfactory than we have seen minate it. He did not make his present

former period. It is owing to your motion from any love of French principles perseverance in forcing them, and to he detested them. He respected Mr. which they are unequal, that they would Pitt's opinion, and though it might have willingly accept of peace. But because great weight in forming his judgment, you have such a prospect at this moment, yet that judgment when once formed, you are by no means certain that a safe he could not give up, out of respect and honourable peace could be obtained. to him, whatever confidence he might That is, at this moment, premature; a place in his wisdom or integrity. Howcontinuance of your perseverance some ever his motion might terminate he time longer, will in all probability produce had the satisfaction to think that he had that happy effect.

done his duty, and was not answerable for Compare the situation and resources of the event. this country, feeling for the burthens of The question being put, “That the the country, which must be felt by the other orders of the day be now read;" the poor and industrious to a certain extent, House divided : and deploring their necessity, as they

Tellers. must obstruct the increasing wealth of the country. Look also at the manufac. Yeas {M.

Mr. John Smith

201 tures and trade and revenue, and compare

Mr. Jenkinson it with the expense of the war. Compare

Mr. Bankes
Noes

86 the annual expenditure of twenty or

Mr. Jekyll twenty-five millions sterling, to the enor- So it was resolved in the affirmative. mous sum of twenty-seven millions sterling per month, or three hundred and Protest against the passing of the Bill for twenty-four millions per annum, the sum augmenting the Royal Artillery out of the yearly expended by France. After you Militia.] May 28. The following Protest have made these comparisons, tell me against the passing of this Bill was entere whether you will lay aside your exertions, on the Journals : under the peculiar circumstances in which “ Dissentient, you are now placed. You have laid on 1. “ Because the honourable footing taxes unprecedented in their amount, but I upon which the militia was established, at the same time having the satisfaction to and has hitherto subsisted, is, as far as reknow that they are borne by the inhabi- lates to the augmenting the Royal Artiltants of this country without any ma- lery, undermined by this bill, inasmuch as terial severe pressure.

it makes the militia a fund for the supply, vided therefore with the most ample and and a drill for the accommodation of anoliberal supplies for the present campaign. ther corps, inasmuch as it reduces this But is that the case with France No. constitutional force below the numbers Every month, every week, is an additional covenanted by the country to be always strain of the new machine, and they are kept complete; and inasmuch as it supnot provided with any of that enormous plies the deficiencies it creates, not in the expense which I have mentioned, but regular and creditable manner by which must raise it all by forced means, by re

the militia is constitutionally to be supquisitions, by robbery, and plunder. Iplied, and supplied to a certainty, but by

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the means, uncertain in their operation present as to the expediency of securing by which it is constitutionally provided in to ourselves in the way proposed by this express terms that it shall not be sup- convention, the co-operation of so great, a plied.

military power as the Emperor. The 2. “ Because upon the allegation of the House had already decided on that point. present conjuncture, it establishes this They had, however, reserved to themselves measure without any express period to its when the conditions should be laid before duration, and without any clause against them, to judge both as to the security ofthe precedent.

fered for the assistance, to the extent to 3. “ Because at a moment when the which it had been stipulated, and for the temper of the times, and our personal repayment of the sums advanced. When knowledge of late events in some corps, the message was originally brought down seem particularly to recommend a vigi. it was doubtful whether, with a view lance in the preservation of discipline and to a larger sum, still more extensive cosubordination, this bill, in a most extra- operation might not have been required. ordinary and unprecedented manner, re- The advances that had been already Jaxes the authority of the commanding made went to the exceedings above the officers over the objects of it, by suggest four millions ; they amounted to about ing to the latter a method which at any 550,0001. Every precaution had been time, &e. on any motive' entitles them to taken that could tend to render the transtheir discharge.'

action safe. The security for repayment 4. “ Because the several circumstances was, first, a general engagement to pay; of disappointment as to the strength of next, a mortgage on the Emperor's here. their regiments, and of degradation by ditary revenues, to be recovered accordthe involuntary removal of their selected ing to the laws of that country, and a de. and most instructed men, by the replacing posit of actions on the bank of Vienna. of them in a less certain and less credi. In case of non-payment, the sum to be table manner, and by converting the regi- made good by this country. But the ments into a recruiting fund for another committee would carry along with them corps, form an impolitic and undeserved that we were guarantees for only a half return to such militia officers (and it has yearly dividend on the accidental failure been admitted in the debates on this bill of payment. A considerable delay had that there are many such) as have merit taken place, which had been full of anxiety with the public.-And

to those concerned in the speculation, as “ I conceive it the more necessary to they were obliged to have their money in mark my disapprobation, and express my readiness. Gentlemen on the other side apprehension of the consequences of this had formerly stated, that the transaction innovation, as I know the militia contains did not present a very advantageous prosa fund for recruiting not only the artillery pect to the subscribers. Fortunately the but every other corps in his majesty's ser- reverse was the case. He concluded with vice, much too good not to be ardently moving, " That it is the opinion of this coveted, and (however the intention committee, that provision be made for be disclaimed at present) [fear re- guaranteeing the payment of the dividends sorted to (as I am sure it may be upon on a loan of 4,600,0001., on account of the same reasoning), when parliament the Emperor of Germany conformably to shall have once notified the principle of the said convention." making the militia subservient to the effi- Mr. For said, that when this business ciency of other corps.

was before the House on a former day, (Signed)

6. RADNOR." they were told that four millions were to

be granted to the Emperor, on condition Debate in the Commons on the Loan to of his providing 200,000 men for the the Emperor of Germany.] May 28. The common cause, as it was termed, but House having resolved itself into a com- that if he should provide a larger army, mittee of the whole House, to which the there should be no objection on our part Convention between his Majesty and the to granting him the sum of six millions ; Emperor* was refered,

and it was added, that the Emperor had Mr. Pitt said, that it did not occur to received some of this money in part of the him to be necessary to say any thing at whole loan; and at that time it was not

known how the proposals would be accept* See Vol. 31, p. 1558.

ed at Vienna. The fact now was, that he

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