History of Louisiana...: The Spanish domination

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Contents

I
1
II
42
III
105
IV
167
V
257
VI
312
VII
386
VIII
447
X
527
XI
576

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Page 621 - Parma, the colony or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States.
Page 574 - Congress, all the military, civil and judicial powers, exercised by the officers of the existing government of the same, shall be vested in such person and persons, and shall be exercised in such manner, as the President of the United States shall direct for maintaining and protecting the inhabitants of Louisiana in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property and religion.
Page 622 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, and admitted as soon as possible, according to the principles of the Federal constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of citizens of the United States; and in the meantime they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the religion which they profess.
Page 621 - Until Congress shall provide for the government of such islands all the civil, judicial, and military powers exercised by the officers of the existing government in said islands shall be vested in such person or persons and shall be exercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct ; and the President shall have power to remove said officers and fill the vacancies so occasioned.
Page 640 - THE President of the United States of America, and the First Consul of the French Republic, in the name of the French people, desiring to remove all source of misunderstanding relative to objects of discussion, mentioned in the second and fifth articles of the convention of the 8th...
Page 492 - ... the authority of the United States, employ any part of the army and navy of the United States...
Page 521 - Irresolution and deliberation are no longer- in season. I renounce Louisiana. It is not only New Orleans that I will cede, it is the whole colony without any reservation.
Page 621 - Congress, unless provision for the temporary government of the said territories be sooner made by Congress, all the military, civil and judicial powers, exercised by the officers of the existing government of the same, shall...
Page 552 - He believed the assent of each individual State to be necessary for the admission of a foreign country as an associate in the Union : in like manner as in a commercial house, the consent of each member would be necessary to admit a new partner into the company ; and whether the assent of every State to such an indispensable amendment were attainable, was uncertain.
Page 642 - As it is reciprocally advantageous to the commerce of France and the United States to encourage the communication of both nations for a limited time in the country ceded by the present treaty, until general arrangements relative to the commerce of both nations may be agreed upon, it has been agreed between the contracting...

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