Comparative Arawakan Histories: Rethinking Language Family and Culture Area in Amazonia

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Jonathan D. Hill, Fernando Santos-Granero
University of Illinois Press, Aug 7, 2002 - Foreign Language Study - 340 pages
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Before they were largely decimated and dispersed by the effects of European colonization, Arawak-speaking peoples were the most widespread language family in Latin America and the Caribbean, and they were the first people Columbus encountered in the Americas. Comparative Arawakan Histories, in paperback for the first time, examines social structures, political hierarchies, rituals, religious movements, gender relations, and linguistic variations through historical perspectives to document sociocultural diversity across the diffused Arawakan diaspora.
 

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Contents

LANGUAGES CULTURES
19
From the Campa Cluster
20
Historical Linguistics and Its Contribution to Improving
74
Hierarchy Regionality
99
Social Dissimilation and Assimilation
147
On How the Paikwené Palikur
171
A New Model of the Northern Arawakan Expansion
199
Multiethnic
248
Prophetic Traditions among the Baniwa and Other Arawakan
269
References Cited
295
Contributors
327
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About the author (2002)

Jonathan D. Hill is chair of the Department of Anthropology at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He is the author of Keepers of the Sacred Chants: The Poetics of Ritual Power in an Amazonian Society.Fernando Santos-Granero is a staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama and the author of The Power of Love: The Moral Use of Knowledge amongst the Amuesha of Central Peru.

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