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Notes EXCHANGED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES

WITH THE GOVERNMENTS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN RELATIVE TO THE INTERPRETATION OF ARTICLE 19 OF THE LONDON NAVAL TREATY OF 1930

The American Ambassador (Castle) to the Japanese Minister of Foreign

Affairs (Shidehara)

No. 49. EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Tokyo, May 21, 1930. EXCELLENCY:

I have the honor, by direction of my Government, to state that it is the understanding of the Government of the United States that the word "category" in Article 19 of the London Naval Treaty of 1930 means "category" or "subcategory". The Government of the United States declares that it interprets the Treaty to mean that vessels becoming over age in either subcategory “A” or subcategory “B” of the cruiser categories (Article 16) shall be replaceable only in that subcategory.

The American Government will be most happy to have the confirmation of this understanding from the Japanese Government.

I avail myself of this opportunity to renew to Your Excellency the assurances of my highest consideration.

W. R. CASTLE, JR. His EXCELLENCY BARON KIJURO SHIDEHARA, His Imperial Japanese Majesty's Minister

for Foreign Affairs, etc., etc., etc.

The Japanese Minister of Foreign Affairs (Shidehara) to the American

Ambassador (Castle)

[Translation]

No. 66/T1

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS,

Tokyo, May 24, 1930. EXCELLENCY:

I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your Note dated May 21, 1930, relative to the interpretation of the term "category" appearing in Article 19 of the London Naval Treaty of 1930.

The Imperial Government understands the word "category" appearing in Article 19 of the above-mentioned treaty to mean "category" or "sub-category;" thus, it interprets this treaty in the sense that ships belonging to either sub-category (a) or sub-category (6) of the cruiser category (Article 16) which shall become over age may be replaced only within that sub-category.

I avail myself of this opportunity to renew to Your Excellency the assurances of my highest consideration.

BARON KIJURO SHIDEHARA,
Minister for Foreign Affairs.

(SEAL
His EXCELLENCY
W. R. CASTLE, JR.,
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary

of the United States of America.

The American Ambassador (Dawes) to the British Secretary of State

for Foreign Affairs (Henderson)

No. 611. EMBASSY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

LONDON, June 5, 1930. SIR:

It is the understanding of the Government of the United States that the word "category” in Article 19 of the London Naval Treaty of 1930 means category or sub-category. The Government of the United States declares that it interprets the Treaty to mean that vessels becoming over-age of either sub-category A or sub-category B of the cruiser categories (Article 16) shall be replaceable only in that sub-category.

I have the honor to state that my Government would be most happy to have a note of confirmation as to whether this interpretation is shared by His Majesty's Government. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, Sir, Your most obedient, humble Servant,

(For the Ambassador)

RAY ATHERTON

Counselor of Embassy. THE RIGHT HONBLE ARTHUR HENDERSON, M. P., etc., etc., etc.,

Foreign Office, S. W'. 1.

The British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs (Henderson) to the

American Ambassador (Dawes)

A 3861/1/45.

FOREIGN OFFICE, S. W. 1.

June 5th, 1930. YOUR EXCELLENCY,

In the note No. 611 which Your Excellency was so good as to address to me on June 5th you stated that it was the understanding of the Government of the United States that the word "category" in Article 19 of the London Naval Treaty, 1930, meant category or sub-category. Your Excellency added that the Government of the United States declared that it interpreted the Treaty to mean that vessels becoming over-age of either sub-category A or sub-category B of the cruiser categories (Article 16) shall be replaceable only in that sub-category

2. His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom note the above understanding and interpretation of the London Naval Treaty of 1930 and concur therein. His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom do so without prejudice to Article 20(a) of that Treaty under which they understand that the tonnage to be scrapped and replaced in the case of the British Commonwealth of Nations by the 91,000 tons of 6'' cruiser tonnage which may be completed before 31st December, 1936, comprises partly 6'' gun cruiser tonnage and Partly cruiser tonnage of the 7.5" gun "Effingham" class. I have the honour to be, with the highest consideration, Your Excellency's obedient Servant,

(For the Secretary of State)

ROBERT VANSITTART His EXCELLENCY GENERAL CHARLES G. Dawes, C. B.,

&c., &c., dec.

(PROCÈS-VERBAL OF THE DEPOSIT OF RATIFICATIONS IN RESPECT

OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND AND ALL PARTS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHICH ARE Not SEPARATE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS, CANADA, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA, INDIA AND JAPAN)

The Undersigned, having met together for the purpose of proceeding to the deposit of ratifications of the Treaty for the limitation and reduction of Naval Armament, signed at London the 22nd day of April, 1930;

Having produced the instruments whereby the said Treaty has been ratified by the President of the United States of America, by His Majesty the King of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, in respect of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 'and Northern Ireland and all parts of the British Empire which are not separate members of the League of Nations, of the Dominion of Canada, of the Commonwealth of Australia, of the Dominion of New Zealand, of the Union of South Africa, and of India; and by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan;

And the respective Ratifications of the said Treaty having been carefully compared and found to be in due form, the said deposit in accordance with the provisions of Article 24(1) of the Treaty took place this day in the customary form.

The representative of the United States of America declared that the instrument of ratification of the United States of America was deposited subject to the distinct and explicit understandings set forth in the resolution of July 21, 1930, of the Senate of the United States of America advising and consenting to ratification, that there are no secret files, documents, letters, understandings or agreements which in any way, directly or indirectly, modify, change, add to, or take from any of the stipulations, agreements or statements in said Treaty; and that, excepting the agreement brought about through the exchange of notes between the Governments of the United States, Great Britain and Japan, having reference to Article 19, there is no agreement, secret or otherwise, expressed or implied, between any of the parties to said Treaty as to any construction that shall hereafter be given to any statement or provision contained therein.

(36)

IN WITNESS WHEREOF they have signed this procès-verbal, and have affixed thereto their seals. DONE at London, the 27th day of October, 1930.

(L.S.) CHARLES G. DAWES.
(L.S.) J. RAMSAY MacDonald.
(L.S.) R. B. BENNETT.
(L.S.) J. H. SCULLIN.
(L.S.) GEO. W. FORBES.
(L.S.) J. B. M. HERTZOG.
(L.S.) ATUL E. CHATTERJEE.
(L.S.) T. MATSUDAIRA.

Certified a true copy: (FOREIGN OFFICE SEAL

S. GASELEE,
Librarian and Keeper of the

Papers at the Foreign Office. LONDON.

29th Oct: 1930.

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