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be decided in each case by special agreement, which special agreement shall provide for the organization of such tribunal if necessary, define its powers, state the question or questions at issue, and settle the terms of reference.

The special agreement in each case shall be made on the part of the United States of America by the President of the United States of America by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and on the part of Albania in accordance with its constitutional laws.

ARTICLE ÎI. The provisions of this treaty shall not be invoked in respect of any dispute the subject matter of which

(a) is within the domestic jurisdiction of either of the High Contracting Parties,

(b) involves the interests of third parties,

(c) depends upon or involves the maintenance of the traditional attitude of the United States concerning American questions, commonly described as the Monroe Doctrine,

(d) depends upon or involves the observance of the obligations of Albania in accordance with the Covenant of the League of Nations.

ARTICLE III. The present treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof and by Albania in accordance with its constitutional laws.

The ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible, and the treaty shall take effect on the date of the exchange of the ratifications. It shall thereafter remain in force continuously unless and until terminated by one year's written notice given by either High Contracting Party to the other.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this treaty in duplicate in the English and Albanian languages, the English text to have authority in case of conflict between the two texts, and hereunto affixed their seals.

Done at Washington the twenty-second day of October in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight.

(Signed) Frank B. Kellogg. Faik Konitza.

1928

TREATY OF CONCILIATION

Signed at Washington, October 22, 1928; ratification advised by the

Senate, December 20, 1928; ratified by the President, January 4, 1929; ratified by Albania, December 27, 1928; ratifications exchanged at Washington, February 12, 1929; proclaimed, February 12, 19.29

(Treaty Series, No. 771; 45 Statutes at Large, 2732) The President of the United States of America and His Majesty the King of the Albanians, being desirous to strengthen the bonds of amity that bind them together and also to advance the cause of general peace, have resolved to enter into a treaty for that purpose, and to that end have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America:

Mr. Frank B. Kellogg, Secretary of State of the United States of America; and

His Majesty the King of the Albanians:

Mr. Faik Konitza, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Albania in the United States of America;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found to be in proper form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I. Any disputes arising between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Albania, of whaterer nature they may be, shall, when ordinary diplomatic proceedings have failed and the High Contracting Parties do not have recourse to adjudication by a competent tribunal, be submitted for investigation and report to a permanent International Commission constituted in the manner prescribed in the next succeeding Article; and they agree not to declare war or begin hostilities during such investigation and before the report is submitted.

ARTICLE II. The International Commission shall be composed of five members to be appointed as follows: One member shall be chosen from each country, by the Government thereof; one member shall be chosen by each Government from some third country; the fifth member shall be chosen by common agreement between the two Governments, it being understood that he shall not be a citizen of either country. The expenses of the Commission shall be paid by the two Governments in equal proportions.

The International Commission shall be appointed within six months after the exchange of ratifications of this treaty; and vacancies shall be filled according to the manner of the original appointment.

ARTICLE III. In case the High Contracting Parties shall have failed to adjust a dispute by diplomatic methods, and they do not have recourse to adjudication by a competent tribunal, they shall at once refer it to the International Commission for investigation and report. The International Commission may, however, spontaneously by unanimous agreement offer its services to that effect, and in such case it shall notify both Governments and request their cooperation in the investigation.

The High Contracting Parties agree to furnish the Permanent International Commission with all the means and facilities required for its investigation and report.

The report of the Commission shall be completed within one year after the date on which it shall declare its investigation to have begun, unless the High Contracting Parties shall limit or extend the time by mutual agreement. The report shall be prepared in triplicate; one copy shall be presented to each Government, and the third retained by the Commission for its files.

The High Contracting Parties reserve the right to act independently on the subject matter of the dispute after the report of the Commission shall have been submitted.

ARTICLE IV. The present treaty shall be ratified by the President of the United States of America by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by Albania in accordance with its constitutional laws.

The ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible, and the treaty shall take effect on the date of the exchange of the ratifications. It shall thereafter remain in force continuously

unless and until terminated by one year's written notice given by either High Contracting Party to the other.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this treaty in duplicate in the English and Albanian languages, the English text to have authority in case of conflict between the two texts, and hereunto affixed their seals.

Done at Washington the twenty-second day of October, in the year one thousand nine hundred and twenty-eight.

(Signed) Frank B. Kellogg. Faik Konitza.

1932

TREATY OF NATURALIZATION

Signed at Tirana, April 5, 1932; ratification advised by the Senate

of the United States, February 6, 19.35; ratified by the President of the United States, March 13, 19.35; ratified by Albania, April 12, 1935; ratifications exchanged at Tirana, July 22, 1935; proclaimed by the President of the United States, July 29, 1935

(Treaty Series, No. 892; 49 Statutes at Large, 3241) The Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Kingdom of Albania, being desirous of reaching an agreement concerning the status of naturalized citizens or subjects of either country who were formerly nationals of the other, and the liability for military service and other acts of allegiance of such persons and of persons born in the territory of either state of parents having the nationality of the other, have resolved to conclude a treaty on these subjects, and for that purpose have appointed their plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

The President of the United States of America: Herman Bernstein, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Albania, and

His Majesty, the King of the Albanians: His Excellency, Pandeli J. Evangheli, Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs ad interim;

Who, having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:

ARTICLE I. Nationals of the United States who have been or shall be naturalized in Albanian territory shall be held by the United States to have lost their former nationality and to be nationals of Albania.

Reciprocally, nationals of Albania who have been or shall be naturalized in territory of the United States shall be held by Albania to have lost their original nationality and to be nationals of the United States.

The word “national”, as used in this convention, means a person owing permanent allegiance to, or having the nationality of, the United States or Albania, respectively, under the laws thereof.

The word “naturalized", as used in this convention, refers only to the naturalization of persons of full age, upon their own applications, and to the naturalization of minors, through the naturalization of their parents. It does not apply to the acquisition of nationality by

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a woman through marriage. Minor children of persons naturalized in either country shall not acquire the nationality of that country until they shall have established their habitual residence there.

ARTICLE II. Nationals of either country, who have or shall become naturalized in the territory of the other, as contemplated in Article I, shall not, upon returning to the country of former nationality, be punished for the original act of emigration, or for failure to respond to calls for military service accruing after bona fide residence was acquired in the territory of the country whose nationality was obtained by naturalization.

ARTICLE III. If a national of either country, who comes within the purview of Article I, shall renew his residence in his country of origin without the intent to return to that in which he was naturalized, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when a person naturalized in one country shall have resided more than two years in the other; but this presumption may be overcome by evidence to the contrary.

ARTICLE IV. A person born in the territory of one party of parents who are nationals of the other party, and having the nationality of both parties under their laws, shall not, if he has his habitual residence, that is, the place of his general abode, in the territory of the state of his birth, be held liable for military service or any other act of allegiance during a temporary stay in the territory of the other party.

ARTICLE V. The present Treaty shall go into effect immediately upon the exchange of ratifications, and shall continue in force for ten years. If neither party shall have given to the other six months previous notice of its intention then to terminate the Treaty, it shall further remain in force until the end of twelve months after either of the contracting parties shall have given notice to the other of such intention.

In witness whereof, the respective plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty and have hereunto affixed their seals. Done in duplicate at Tirana, this fifth day of April, 1932.

(Signed) Herman Bernstein. Pandeli J. Evangheli.

1933

TREATY OF EXTRADITION Signed at Tirana, March 1, 1933; ratification advised by the Senate

of the United States, February 2, 1934 (legislative day of January 23, 1934); ratified by the President of the United States, February 21, 1934; ratified by Albania, April 20, 1935; ratifications exchanged at Washington, November 14, 1935; proclaimed by the President of the United States, November 19, 1935

(Treaty Series, No. 902; 49 Statutes at Large, 3313) The United States of America and Albania, desiring to promote the cause of justice, have resolved to conclude a treaty for the extradition of fugitives from justice between the two countries and have appointed for that purpose the following Plenipotentiaries:

The President of the United States of America: Herman Bernstein, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to Albania;

His Majesty the King of the Albanians: His Excellency M. Djafer Vila, Minister for Foreign Affairs;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I. It is agreed that the Government of the United States and the Government of Albania shall, upon requisition duly made as herein provided, deliver up to justice any person who may be charged with, or may have been convicted of, any of the crimes or offenses specified in Article II of the present Treaty committed within the jurisdiction of one of the High Contracting Parties, and who shall seek an asylum or shall be found within the territories of the other; provided that such surrender shall take place only upon such evidence of criminality, as according to the laws of the place where the fugitive or person so charged shall be found, would justify his apprehension and commitment for trial if the crime or offense had been there committed.

ARTICLE II. Persons shall be delivered up according to the provisions of the present Treaty, who shall have been charged with or convicted of any of the following crimes or offenses :

1. Murder, (including crimes designated by the terms parricide, poisoning, and infanticide); manslaughter, when voluntary.

2. Malicious wounding or inflicting grievous bodily harm with premeditation.

3. Rape, abortion, carnal knowledge of children under the age of 15 years. 4. Abduction or detention of women or girls for immoral purposes. 5. Bigamy. 6. Arson.

7. Willful and unlawful destruction or obstruction of railroads, which endangers human life.

8. Crimes committed at sea :

(a) Piracy, as commonly known and defined by the law of nations, or by statutes;

(b) Wrongfully sinking or destroying a vessel at sea or attempting to do so;

(c) Mutiny or conspiracy by two or more members of the crew or other persons on board of a vessel on the high seas, for the purpose of rebelling against the authority of the Captain or Commander of such vessel, or by fraud or violence taking possession of such vessel;

(d) Assault on board ship upon the high seas with intent to do bodily harm.

9. Burglary; house-breaking.

10. The act of breaking into and entering the offices of the Government or public authorities, or other buildings not dwellings with intent to commit a felony therein.

11. Robbery.
12. Forgery or the utterance of forged papers.

13. The forgery or falsification of the official acts of the Government or public authorities, including Courts of Justice, or the uttering or fraudulent use of any of the same.

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