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Whenever a request for an advisory opinion comes to the Court, the Registrar shall notify the United States thereof, among other States mentioned in the now existing Article_73_of the Rules of Court

, stating a reasonable time-limit fixed by the President within which a written statement by the United States concerning the request will be received. If for any reason no sufficient opportunity for an exchange of views upon such request should have been afforded and the United States advises the Court that the question upon which the opinion of the Court is asked is one that affects the interests of the United States, proceedings shall be stayed for a period sufficient to enable such an exchange of views between the Council or the As. sembly and the United States to take place.

With regard to requesting an advisory opinion of the Court in any case covered by the preceding paragraphs, there shall be attributed to an objection of the United States the same force and effect as attaches to a vote against asking for the opinion given by a Member of the League of Nations in the Council or in the Assembly.

If, after the exchange of views provided for in paragraphs 1 and of this Article, it shall appear that no agreement can be reached and the United States is not prepared to forgo its objection, the exercise of the powers of withdrawal provided for in Article 8 hereof will follow naturally without any imputation of unfriendliness to unwillingness to co-operate generally for peace and goodwill.

ARTICLE 6. Subject to the provisions of Article 8 below, the provisions of the present Protocol shall have the same force and effect as the provisions of the Statute of the Court and any future signature of the Protocol of December 16th, 1920, shall be deemed to be an acceptance of the provisions of the present Protocol.

ARTICLE 7. The present Protocol shall be ratified. Each State shall forward the instrument of ratification to the Secretary-General of the League of Nations, who shall inform all the other signatory States The instruments of ratification shall be deposited in the archives of the Secretariat of the League of Nations.

The present Protocol shall come into force as soon as all States which have ratified the Protocol of December 16th, 1920, and also the United States, have deposited their ratifications.

ARTICLE 8. The United States may at any time notify the Secretary-General of the League of Nations that it withdraws its ad. herence to the Protocol of December 16th, 1920. The Secretary General shall immediately communicate this notification to all the other States signatories of the Protocol.

In such case, the present Protocol shall cease to be in force as from the receipt by the Secretary-General of the notification by the United States.

On their part each of the other Contracting States may at ang time notify the Secretary-General of the League of Nations that it desires to withdraw its acceptance of the special conditions attached by the United States to its adherence to the Protocol of December 16th, 1920. The Secretary-General shall immediately give communication of this notification to each of the States signatories of the present Protocol. The present Protocol shall be considered as ceasing to be in force if and when, within one year from the date of receipt of the said notification, not less than two-thirds of the Con

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tracting States other than the United States shall have notified the Secretary-General of the League of Nations that they desire to withdraw the above-mentioned acceptance.

Done at Geneva, the fourteenth day of September, nineteen hundred and twenty-nine, in a single-copy, of which the French and English texts shall both be authoritative. (Signed) Union of South Africa: Eric H. Louw; Germany: Fr.

Gaus; United States of America: Jay Pierrepont
Moffat; Austrialia : W. Harrison Moore; Austria:
Dr. Marcus Leitmaier; Belgium: Henri Rolin; Bo-
livia: A. Cortadellas; Brazil: M. de Pimentel
Brandao; Great Britain and Northern Ireland and
all Parts of the British Empire which are not sep-
arate Members of the League of Nations: Arthur
Henderson; Bulgaria : Vladimir Molloff; Canada: R.
Dandurand; Chile: Luis V. de Porto-Seguro; China:
Chao-Chu Wu; Colombia : Francisco José Urrutia ;
Cuba: G. de' Blanck; Denmark: Georg Cohn;
Dominican Republic: M. L. Vasquez G.; Spain: C.
Botella; Estonia: A. Schmidt; Finland: A. S. Yrjö-
Koskinen; France: Henri Fromageot; Greece: Po-
litis; Guatemala : F. Mora; Haiti: Luc Dominique;
Hungary: Ladislas Gajzago; India : Md. Habibullah;
Irish Free State: John A. Costello; Italy: Vittorio
Scialoja; Japan: Isaburo Yoshida; Latvia: Charles
Duzmans; Liberia : A. _Sottile; Luxemburg: Bech;
Nicaragua : Francisco Torres F.; Norway: Arnold
Raestad; New Zealand: C. J. Parr; Panama: J. D.
Arosemena; Paraguay: R. V. Caballero de Bedoya;
The Netherlands: V. Eysinga; Peru: Mar. H. Corn-
ejo; Persia : P. P. Kitabgi; Poland: M. Rostworow-
ski, S. Rundstein; Portugal: Prof. Doutor J. Lobo
d'Avila Lima; Roumania: Antoniade; Salvador: J.
Gustavo Guerrero; Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats
and Slovenes: I. Choumenkovitch; Siam: Varnvai-
dya; Sweden: E. Marks von Wrütemberg; Switzer-
land: Motta; Czechoslovakia : Zd. Fierlinger; Uru-

guay: A. Guani; Venezuela: C. Zumeta.
Certified true copy.
Geneva,
For the Secretary General

(Signed) J. A. Buero, Legal Adviser of the Secretariat.

1933-1937

SILVER—PROCLAMATIONS RELATING TO THE COINAGE THEREOF

[For International Silver Agreement of July, 1933, see Page 5507 this Volume)

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Whereas, by paragraph (2) of section 43, title III, of the Act of Congress, approved May 12, 1933 (Public, No. 10), the President is authorized "By proclamation to fix the weight of the gold dollar in grains nine tenths fine and also to fix the weight of the silver dollar in grains nine tenths fine at a definite fixed ratio in relation to the gold dollar at such amounts as he finds necessary from his investigation to stabilize domestic prices or to protect the foreign commerce against the adverse effect of depreciated foreign currencies and to provide for the unlimited coinage of such gold and silver at the ratio so fixed,

""; and Whereas, from investigations made by me, I find it necessary, in aid of the stabilization of domestic prices and in accordance with the policy and program authorized by Congress, which are now being administered, and to protect our foreign commerce against the adverse effect of depreciated foreign currencies, that the price of silver be enhanced and stabilized; and

Whereas, a resolution presented by the delegation of the United States of America was unanimously adopted at the World Economie and Monetary Conference in London on July 20, 1933, by the representatives of 66 Governments, which in substance provided that said Governments will abandon the policy and practice of melting up or debasing silver coins; that low-valued silver currency be replaced with silver coins and that no legislation should be enacted that will depreciate the value of silver; and

Whereas, a separate and supplemental agreement was entered into. at the instance of the representatives of the United States, bet weer China, India, and Spain, the holders and users of large quantities of silver, on the one hand, and Australia, Canada, Mexico, Peru, and the United States on the other hand, as the chief producers of silver

. wherein China agreed not to dispose of any silver derived from the melting up or debasement of silver coins, and India agreed not to dispose of over 35,000,000 ounces of silver per annum during a period of 4 years commencing January 1, 1934, and Spain agreed not to dispose of over 5,000,000 ounces of silver annually during said period, and both of said Governments agreed that at the end of said period of 4 years they would then subject themselves to the general resolution adopted at the London Conference, and in consideration of such limitation it was agreed that the Governments of the five producing countries would each absorb from the mines in their respective countries a certain amount of silver, the total amount to be absorbed by said producing countries being 35,000,000 ounces per annum during the 4 years commencing the 1st day of January 1934; that such silver so absorbed would be retained in each of said respective countries for said period of 4 years, to be used for coinage purposes or as reserves for currency, or to otherwise be retained and kept off the world market during such period of time, it being understood that of the 35,000,000 ounces the United States was to absorb annually at least 24,421,410 ounces of the silver produced in the United States during such period of time.

Now, therefore, finding it proper to cooperate with other Governments and necessary to assist in increasing and stabilizing domestic prices, to augment the purchasing power of peoples in silver-using countries, to protect our foreign commerce against the adverse effect of depreciated foreign currencies, and to carry out the understanding between the 66 Governments that adopted the resolution hereinbefore referred to; by virtue of the power in me vested by the act of Congress above cited, the other legislation designated for national recovery, and by virtue of all other authority in me vested;

I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, do proclaim and direct that each United States coinage mint shall receive for coinage into standard silver dollars any silver which such mint, subject to regulations prescribed hereunder by the Secretary of the Treasury, is satisfied has been mined, subsequently to the date of this proclamation, from natural deposits in the United States or any place subject to the jurisdiction thereof. The Director of the Mint, with the voluntary consent of the owner, shall deduct and . retain of such silver so received 50 percent as seigniorage and for services performed by the Government of the United States relative to the coinage and delivery of silver dollars. The balance of such silver so received, that is, 50 percent thereof, shall be coined into standard silver dollars and the same, or an equal number of other standard silver dollars, shall be delivered to the owner or depositor of such silver. The 50 percent of such silver so deducted shall be retained as bullion by the Treasury and shall not be disposed of prior to the thirty-first day of December 1937, except for coining into United States coins.

The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to prescribe regulations to carry out the purposes of this proclamation. Such regulations shall contain provisions substantially similar to the provisions contained in the regulations made pursuant to the act of Congress, approved April 23, 1918 (40 Stat. L., p. 535), known as the Pittman Act, with such changes as he shall determine prescribing how silver mined, subsequently to the date of this proclamation from natural deposits in the United States or any place subject to the jurisdiction thereof, shall be identified.

This proclamation shall remain in force and effect until the 31st day of December 1937, unless repealed or modified by act of Congress or by subsequent proclamation.

The present ratio in weight and fineness of the silver dollar to the gold dollar shall, for the purposes of this proclamation, be maintained until changed by further order or proclamation.

Notice is hereby given that I reserve the right by virtue of the authority vested in me to revoke or modify this proclamation as the interest of the United States may seem to require.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this twenty-first day of December,

in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-three, (SEAL] and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fifty-eighth.

(Signed) Franklin D. Roosevelt. By the President:

William Phillips, Acting Secretary of State.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

Whereas, by Proclamation of the twenty-first day of December, 1933, as modified by Proclamation of the ninth day of August, 1934. the United States coinage mints are directed to receive for coinage and addition to the monetary stocks of the United States silver mined subsequent to December 21, 1933 from natural deposits in the United States or any place subject to the jurisdiction thereof; and

Whereas, such Proclamation as so modified is subject to revocation or further modification as the interest of the United States may seem to require.

Now, therefore, finding that the interests of the United States require further modification of said Proclamation of the twenty-firs day of December, 1933; by virtue of the power in me vested by the act of Congress 'cited 'in said Proclamation, and other legislation designated for national recovery, and by virtue of all other authority in me vested;

I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of America. do proclaim and direct that, with respect to all silver received by a United States coinage mint under the provisions of the Proclamation of the twenty-first day of December, 1933 which such mint, subject to regulations prescribed hereunder by the Secretary of the Treasury, is satisfied has been mined on or after April 10, 1935, from natural deposits in the United States or any place subject to the juris diction thereof, the deduction for seigniorage and services performed by the Government shall be 45 per cent and there shall be returned therefor in standard silver dollars, silver certificates, or any other coin or currency of the United States the monetary value of the silver so received (that is, $1.2929+ a fine ounce), less such deduction of 45 per cent.

Notice is hereby given that I reserve the right by virtue of the authority vested in me to revoke or modify this proclamation as the interest of the United States may seem to require.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this 10th day of April, in the rear

of our Lord nineteen hundred and thirty-five, and of the [SEAL] Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and fifty-ninth.

(Signed) Franklin D. Roosevelt. By the President:

Cordell Hull, Secretary of State.

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