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Indian hostilities.

ARTICLE XXXIII.

It is likewise agreed that the two contracting parties shall, by all the means in their power, maintain peace and harmony among the several Indian nations who inhabit the lands adjacent to the lines and rivers which form the boundaries of the two countries; and the better to attain this object, both parties bind themselves expressly to restrain, by force, all hostilities and incursions on the part of the Indian nations living within their respective boundaries: so that the United States of America will not suffer their Indians to attack the citizens of the United Mexican States, nor the Indians inhabiting their territory; nor will the United Mexican States permit the Indians residing within their territories to commit hostilities against the citizens of the United States of America, nor against the Indians residing within the limits of the United States, in any manner whatever.

Prisoners made by Indians

And in the event of any person or persons, captured by the Indians who inhabit the territory of either of the contracting parties, being or having been carried into the territories of the other, both Governments engage and bind themselves in the most solemn manner to return them to their country as soon as they know of their being within their respective territories, or to deliver them up to the agent or representative of the Government that claims them, giving to each other, reciprocally, timely notice, and the claimant paying the expenses incurred in the transmission and maintenance of such person or persons, who, in the mean time, shall be treated with the utmost hospitality by the local authorities of the place where they may be. Nor shall it be lawful, under any pretext whatever, for the citizens of either of the contracting parties to purchase or hold captive prisoners made by the Indians inhabiting the territories of the other.

ARTICLE XXXIV.

1

The United States of America and the United Mexican States, desiring to make as durable as circumstances will permit, the relations which are to be established between the two parties by virtue of this treaty or general convention of amity, commerce, and navigation, have declared solemnly, and do agree to the following points:

First. The present treaty shall remain and be in force for eight years from the day of the exchange of the ratifications, and until Duration of treaty. the end of one year after either of the contracting parties shall have given notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same; each of the contracting parties reserving to itself the right of giving such notice to the other, at the end of said term of eight years. And it is hereby agreed between them that, on the expiration of one year after such notice shall have been received by either of the parties from the other party, this treaty, in all its parts, relating to commerce and navigation, shall altogether cease and determine, and in all those parts which relate to peace and friendship, it shall be permanently and perpetually binding on both the contracting parties.

Secondly. If any one or more of the citzens of either party shall infringe any of the articles of this treaty, such citizens shall be held personally responsible for the same; and the harmony and good correspondence between the two nations shall not be interrupted thereby; each party engaging in no way to protect the offender, or sanction such violation.

hostilities.

to precede

Thirdly. If (what, indeed cannot be expected) any of the articles. contained in the present treaty shall be violated or in- Demand of satis fracted in any manner whatever, it is stipulated that neither faction of the contracting parties will order or authorize any acts of reprisal, nor declare war against the other, on complaints of injuries or damages, until the said party considering itself offended shall first have presented to the other a statement of such injuries or damages, verified by competent proofs, and demanded justice and satisfaction, and the same shall have been either refused or unreasonably delayed. Fourthly. Nothing in this treaty contained shall, however, be construed to operate contrary to former and existing public treaties with other Sovereigns or States.

The present treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation shall be approved and ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by the Vice-President of the United Mexican States, with the consent and approbation of the Congress thereof; and the ratifications shall be exchanged in the city of Washington, within the term of one year, to be counted from the date of the signature hereof, or sooner if possible.

In witness whereof we, the Plenipotentiaries of the United States of America and of the United Mexican States, have signed and sealed these presents. Done in the city of Mexico on the fifth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one, in the fifty-fifth year of the Independence of the United States of America, and in the eleventh of that of the United Mexican States.

A. BUTLER.
LUCAS ALAMAN.

[L. S.]

L. S.

RAFAEL MANGINO. [L. S.]

ADDITIONAL ARTICLE.

would not

Fifth and sixth ar

ticles suspended.

Substitute.

Whereas, in the present state of the Mexican shipping, it be possible for Mexico to receive the full advantage of the reciprocity established in the fifth and sixth articles of the treaty signed this day, it is agreed that for the term of six years, the stipulations contained in the said articles shall be suspended; and in lieu thereof, it is hereby agreed, that, until the expiration of the said term of six years, American vessels entering into the ports of Mexico, and all articles the produce, growth, or manufacture of the United States of America, imported in such vessels, shall pay no other or higher duties than are or may hereafter be payable in the said ports by the vessels and the like articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of the most favored nation; and, reciprocally, it is agreed that Mexican vessels entering into the ports of the United States of America, and all articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United Mexican States, imported in such vessels, shall pay no other or higher duties than are, or may hereafter be, payable in the said ports by the vessels and the like articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of the most favored nation; and that no higher duties shall be paid, or bounties or drawbacks allowed, on the exportation of any article the growth, produce, or manufacture of either country, in the vessels of the other, than upon the exportation of the like articles in the vessels of any other foreign country.

The present additional article shall have the same force and value as

if it had been inserted, word for word, in the treaty signed this day. It shall be ratified, and the ratification exchanged at the same time.

In witness whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed and sealed the same.

Done at Mexico on the fifth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one.

[L. S.]

L. S.

A. BUTLER.
LUCAS ALAMAN.
RAFAEL MANGINO. [L. S.]

MEXICO, 1835.

SECOND ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TO TREATY OF JANUARY 12, 1828. CONCLUDED APRIL 3, 1835; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED APRIL 20, 1836; PROCLAIMED APRIL 21, 1836.

A treaty having been concluded and signed in the city of Mexico, on the 12th day of January, 1828, between the United States of America and the Mexican United States, for the purpose of establishing the true dividing line and boundary between the two nations, the 3d article of which treaty is as follows: "To fix this line with more precision, and to place the landmarks which shall designate exactly the limits of both nations, each of the contracting parties shall appoint a commissioner and a surveyor, who shall meet before the termination of one year from the date of the ratification of this treaty at Natchitoches, on the Red River, and proceed to run and mark said line from the mouth of the Sabine to the Red River, and from the Red River to the river Arkansas, and to ascertain the latitude of the source of said river Arkansas, in conformity to what is agreed upon and stipulated, and the line of latitude 42 to the South Sea. They shall make out plans, and keep journals of their proceedings, and the result agreed upon by them shall be considered as part of this treaty, and shall have the same force as if it were inserted therein. The two Governments will amicably agree respecting the necessary articles to be furnished to those persons, and also as to their respective escorts, should such be deemed necessary:" And the ratifications of said treaty having been exchanged in the city of Washington, on the 5th day of April, in the year of 1832, but from various causes the contracting parties have been unable to perform the stipulations contained in the above-mentioned 3d article, and the period within which the said stipulations could have been executed has elapsed; and both Republics being desirous that the said treaty should be carried into effect with all due solemnity, the President of the United States of America has for that purpose fully empowered on his part Anthony Butler, a citizen thereof and Chargé d'Affaires of said States in Mexico, and the acting President of the United Mexican States having in like manner fully empowered on his part their Excellencies José Maria Gutierrez de Estrada, Secretary of State for Home and Foreign Affairs, and José Mariano Blasco, Secretary of the Treasury; and the said Plenipotentiaries, after having mutually exchanged their full pow ers, found to be ample and in form, they have agreed and do hereby agree to the following second additional article to the said treaty: Within the space of one year, to be estimated from the date of the Commissioners and exchange of the ratifications of this said additional article, there shall be appointed by the Government of the United States of America and of the Mexican United States, each a commissioner and surveyor, for the purpose of fixing with more precision the

surveyors.

dividing-line, and for establishing the landmarks of boundary and limits between the two nations, with the exactness stipulated by the 3d article of the Treaty of Limits, concluded and signed in Mexico on the 12th day of January, 1828, and the ratifications of which were exchanged in Washington city on the 5th day of April, 1832. And the present additional article shall have the same force and effect as if it had been inserted word for word in the above-mentioned treaty of the 12th of January, 1828, and shall be approved and ratified in the manner prescribed by the Constitutions of the respective States.

In faith of which the said Plenipotentiaries have hereunto set their hands and affixed their respective seals.

Done in the city of Mexico on the third day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five, in the fifty-ninth year of the Independence of the United States of America, and of the fifteenth of that of the United Mexican States.

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CONVENTION FOR THE ADJUSTMENT OF CLAIMS OF CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA UPON THE GOVERNMENT OF THE MEXICAN REPUBLIC. CONCLUDED APRIL 11, 1839; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED APRIL 7, 1840; PROCLAIMED APRIL 8, 1840.

Whereas a convention for the adjustment of claims of citizens of the United States upon the Government of the Mexican Republic was concluded and signed at Washington on the 10th day of September, 1838, which convention was not ratified on the part of the Mexican Government, on the alleged ground that the consent of His Majesty the King of Prussia to provide an arbitrator to act in the case provided by said convention could not be obtained;

And whereas the parties to said convention are still, and equally, desirous of terminating the discussions which have taken place between them in respect to said claims, arising from injuries to the persons and property of citizens of the United States by Mexican authorities, in à manner equally advantageous to the citizens of the United States, by whom said injuries have been sustained, and more convenient to Mexico than that provided by said convention:

The President of the United States has named for this purpose, and furnished with full powers, John Forsyth, Secretary of State of the said United States; and the President of the Mexican Republic has named His Excellency Señor Don Francisco Pizarro Martinez, accredited as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Mexican Republic to the United States, and has furnished him with full powers for the same purpose;

And the said Plenipotentiaries have agreed upon and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

It is agreed that all claims of citizens of the United States upon the Mexican Government, statements of which, soliciting the Claims to be reinterposition of the Government of the United States, have ferred to a board of been presented to the Department of State or to the diplo

four commissioners.

matic agent of the United States at Mexico until the signature of this convention, shall be referred to four commissioners, who shall form a board, and be appointed in the following manner, namely: two commissioners shall be appointed by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and two commissioners by the President of the Mexican Republic. The said commissioners, so appointed, shall be sworn impartially to examine and decide upon the said claims according to such evidence as shall be laid before them on the part of the United States and the Mexican Republic respectively.

Secretaries, &c.

ARTICLE II.

The said board shall have two secretaries, versed in the English and Spanish languages; one to be appointed by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and the other by the President of the Mexican Republic. And the said secretaries shall be sworn faithfully to discharge their duty in that capacity.

Meeting

ARTICLE III.

The said board shall meet in the city of Washington within three months after the exchange of the ratifications of this convention, and within eighteen months from the time of its meeting shall terminate its duties. The Secretary of State of the United States shall, immediately after the exchange of the ratifications of this convention, give notice of the time of the meeting of the said board, to be published in two newspapers in Washington, and in such other papers as he may think proper.

Documents to be delivered.

ARTICLE IV.

All documents which now are in, or hereafter, during the continuance of the commission constituted by this convention, may come into the possession of the Department of State of the United States, in relation to the aforesaid claims, shall be delivered to the board. The Mexican Government shall furnish all such documents and explanations as may be in their possession, for the adjustment of the said claims according to the principles of justice, the law of nations, and the stipulations of the treaty of amity and commerce between the United States and Mexico of the 5th of April, 1831; the said documents to be specified when demanded at the instance of the said commissioners.

ARTICLE V.

The said commissioners shall, by a report under their hands and seals, decide upon the justice of the said claims and the amount of compensation, if any, due from the Mexican Government in each case.

The commissioners

to decide on the jus

tice of claims, &c.

Mexico to issue

ARTICLE VI.

It is agreed that if it should not be convenient for the Mexican Government to pay at once the amount so found due, it shall Tre sur notes for be at liberty, immediately after the decisions in the several cases shall have taken place, to issue Treasury notes, re

the amount found

due

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