Temple Bar, Volume 8

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Ward and Lock, 1863
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Page 279 - Secondly, for the advocates and counsel that plead ; patience and gravity of hearing is an essential part of justice ; and an over-speaking judge is no well-tuned cymbal. It is no grace to a judge, first to find that which he might have heard in due time from the bar; or to show quickness of conceit in cutting off evidence or counsel too short ; or to prevent information by questions, though pertinent.
Page 108 - I say, by God, that man is a ruffian who shall, after this, presume to build upon such honest, artless conduct as an evidence of guilt.
Page 539 - E'er tripped with foot so free ; She seemed as happy as a wave That dances on the sea. There came from me a sigh of pain Which I could ill confine ; I looked at her, and looked again : And did not wish her mine...
Page 540 - Love had he found in huts where poor Men lie : His daily Teachers had been Woods and Rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Page 277 - That your speech be with gravity, as one of the sages of the law : and not talkative, nor with impertinent flying out to show learning.
Page 181 - Near this spot Are deposited the Remains of one Who possessed Beauty without Vanity, Strength without Insolence, Courage without Ferocity, And all the Virtues of Man without his Vices. This Praise, which would be unmeaning Flattery If inscribed over Human Ashes, Is but a just tribute to the Memory of BOATSWAIN, a Dog, Who was born at Newfoundland, May 1803, And died at Newstead Abbey, November 18, 1808.
Page 481 - is almost out of print. Mrs. Barbauld's stuff has banished all the old classics of the nursery...
Page 481 - Science has succeeded to poetry no less in the little walks of children than with men. Is there no possibility of averting this sore evil? Think what you would have been now, if, instead of being fed with tales and old wives...
Page 181 - When some proud son of man returns to earth, Unknown to glory, but upheld by birth, The sculptor's art exhausts the pomp of woe, And storied urns record who rests below; When all is done, upon the tomb is seen, Not what he was, but what he should have been...
Page 182 - Near this spot Are deposited the Remains Of one Who Possessed Beauty Without Vanity, Strength without Insolence, Courage without Ferocity, And all the Virtues of Man Without his Vices. This Praise, which would be unmeaning flattery If inscribed over Human Ashes, Is but a just tribute to the Memory of "Boatswain," a Dog Who was born at Newfoundland, May, 1803, And died at Newstead Abbey Nov. 18, 1808.

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