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SR. D. ROMÁN MACAYA, Mutua de Fabricantes de Tejidos, Carribia 6, Barcelona, Spain.

By W. D. HARTSHORNE.

JOHN MACMANUS, Supt. The Utica Willowvale Bleachery Co., Chadwicks, N. Y.

By DANIEL J. Danker.

MANLEY G. MORRILL, Supt. Attawaugan Company, Ballouville, Killingly, Conn.

By C. H. TRUESDELL.

RAMSAY PEUGNET, Sec'y and Treas. New York Silk Conditioning Works, 138 Spring St., New York City.

By W. D. HARTSHORNE. ROBERT PRIEBSCH, Owner Firm Johann Priebsch Erben, Morchenstern, Post Tannwald, Bohemia, Austria.

By WILLIAM F. PARISH, Jr.

CHARLES H. RICHARDSON, Jr., Supt. Shove Mills, Fall River, Mass.

By W. IRVING BULLARD.

William RICHARDSON, Asst. Supt. The Putnam Mfg. Co., 345 Church St., Putnam, Conn.

By GEORGE A. VAUGHAN.

JAMES H. Ross, Firm John L. Ross & Son, 184 Church St., Willimantic, Conn.

By WALTER B. KNIGHT.

John H. Ross, Treas. R. W. Lord Co., 575 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass.

By W. K. SANBORN.

NARAZO TAKATSUJI, Dir. and Gen. Supt. The Kanegafuchi Cotton Spinning Co., Tokio, Japan.

By H. H. FUKUHARA. H. P. TAVEIRA, Mgr. Compantia Fabril Lisboneuse, 236 Rua da Palma,

Lisboa, Portugal. By W. D. HARTSHORNE.

FREDERICH UEBEL, Member firm Gebrüder Uebel Netzschkau u. Adorf, Plauen, Saxony, Germany.

By W. D. HARTSHORNE.

BERTRAND A. WEBBER, Supt., Nottingham Mill, 314 Dyer St., Provi

dence, R. I. By WILLIAM J. STEWART.

WILLIAM R. WEST, Prest. Mt. Pleasant Banding Co., 12 Dudley St., New Bedford, Mass.

By CHARLES ·M. HOLMES.

John H. WHITE, Supt. Edwards Mfg. Co., Augusta, Me.

By ALBERT S. PRATT.
John G. WHITTAKER, Supt. Glenlyon Dye Works, Saylesville, R. I.

By STEWART F. CARTER.

Paul C. Wilde, Supt. Middlesex Bleach, Dye and Print Works, 3 Harding Ave., Waltham, Mass.

By CHARLES E. GETCHELL.

ARTHUR L. Willey, Asst. Supt., Grant Yarn Co., 41 Arlington St., Fitchburg, Mass.

By William E. KEACH.

FOR ASSOCIATE MEMBERS.

FRANCIS W. DEAN, Mill Engineer and Architect, 53 State St., Boston, Mass.

By W. D. HARTSHORNE.

JOSEPH P. GRAY, Prest. Boston Mfrs. Mutual Fire Ins. Co., 31 Milk St.,

Boston, Mass. By C. J. H. WOODBURY.

ALBERT H. GREEN, Kitson Machine Shop, Lowell Mass.

By HAVEN C. PERHAM.

JOHN WALTER GUMMEY, George H. McFadden & Bro., 70 Kilby St.

Boston, Mass. By W. D. HARTSHORNE. FRED M. HOADLEY, Sec'y and Treas., R. I. Contract Engineering Co., 144 Westminister St., P. O. Box 1211, Providence, R. I.

By MELDON H. MERRILL. CHARLES E. HODGES, Asst. Mgr. American Mutual Liability Insurance Co., 50 State St., Boston, Mass.

By WILLIAM WHITMAN. CHARLES D. LANNING, Vice Prest. and Treas. American Warp Drawing Co., 95 Milk St., Boston, Mass.

By EDGAR F. HATHAWAY.

STANLEY R. LATSHAW, Mgr. Textile Department Curtis Publishing Co., i Madison Ave., New York City.

By DANIEL J. DANKER. Gui M. LINCOLN, Sec'y The Bader Coal Co., 131 State St., Room 515,

Boston, Mass. By MELDON H. MERRILL. ARTHUR D. LITTLE, Industrial Chemist and Engineer 93 Broad St.,

Boston, Mass. By W. D. HARTSHORNE. J. IRVINE LYLE, Gen. Mgr. Carrier Air Conditioning Co., Taylor Bldg., 39 Cortlandt St., New York City.

By JOHN P. MARSTON.
Harry F. Nuzum, Cotton Broker, 320 Broadway, New York City.

By DANIEL J. DANKER.

FREDERIC W. Parks, Mem. Firm G. M. Parks & Co., 453 Main St., Fitchburg, Mass.

By W. F. STILES.

NEWELL W. Tilton, Harding, Whitman & Co., 350 Broadway, New

York City. By NATHANIEL F. AYER,

WRIGHT WEBB, Mgr. Boston Office, Providence Engineering Works, 131 State St., Room 503, Boston, Mass.

By MELDON H. MERRILL.

ALEXANDER S. WEST, U. S. Gutta Percha Paint Co., 53 Laurel St.,

Providence, R. I. By Gay D. THAYER.

The PRESIDENT. I will appoint as the committee for collecting and counting the ballots for new members Messrs. W. W. CROSBY, RICHARD H. Rice and A. G. HENRY.

The committee attended to their duty and subsequently submitted the following report.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ELECTION OF MEMBERS.

The committee appointed to collect, sort and count ballots for new members, report that thirty-nine ballots have been cast, all of which are for the list of applicants recommended by the Board of Government.

Respectfully submitted,

W. W. CROSBY,
RICHARD H. Rice,
A. G. HENRY.

The PRESIDENT. This having been the verdict of your meeting I pronounce these persons elected members of this Association.

The PRESIDENT. The next paper will be on Belts and Belt Transmission, by CHAS. F. CHASE, one of our members who is Eastern manager of the Cling Surface Company, of Buffalo.

BELTS AND BELT TRANSMISSION.

CHAS. F. CHASE, 39 Cortlandt St., New York City.

In the preparation of this paper it has been found that there is available comparatively little information on belts. Even the new International Encyclopædia claimed by its publishers to be “the one thoroughly practical educator of the day” devotes but a half page to the subject. The different kinds of belts are named but not a single rule governing their use and operation is given. But it devotes three whole pages to “weaving” and three and a half pages to "spinning.'

Nearly everything printed covers the results of experiments, mostly of short duration, conducted with special apparatus. The rules given by the different writers vary between wide extremes. For example, five separate authorities differ so much in their recommendations that for the same conditions the width of a belt varies from 18 inches to 42 inches (CROMWELL). Again the number of lineal feet of single belting one inch wide passing around a pulley per minute required to transmit one horse power is given as 550 feet by one authority while another claims that 1,100 feet of double belting is required to transmit the same power (KENT, page 882). There is much difference of opinion as to the belt tension necessary for the best results, varying from 30 to 75 pounds per inch in width.

“Who shall decide when doctors disagree?”

We believe, however, that all writers do agree that more knowledge on this subject is needed. Mr. Lewis in Experiments on the Transmission of Power by Belting (Trans. A. S. M. E. VII, 1886) says: " There is still need of more light on

) the subject.” Mr. TAYLOR, in his Notes on Belting (Trans. A. S. M. E. XV, 1893) says: “ One fact becomes more appar

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