Harper's Magazine, Volume 22

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Henry Mills Alden, Thomas Bucklin Wells, Lee Foster Hartman, Frederick Lewis Allen
Harper & Brothers, 1861
Important American periodical dating back to 1850.
 

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Page 456 - No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries. No climate that is not witness to their toils.
Page 413 - There goes many a ship to sea with many hundred souls in one ship, whose weal and woe is common, and is a true picture of a commonwealth, or a human combination or society. It hath fallen out sometimes, that both papists and protestants, Jews and Turks, may be embarked in one ship ; upon which supposal I affirm, that all the liberty of conscience, that ever I pleaded for, turns upon these two hinges — that none of the papists, protestants, Jews or Turks, be forced to come to the ship's prayers...
Page 277 - There is nothing better for a man, than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labour.
Page 107 - THERE is NO WEALTH BUT LIFE. Life, including all its powers of love, of joy, and of admiration. That country is the richest which nourishes the greatest number of noble and happy human...
Page 247 - It is not only by doing the right thing, but by doing the right thing in the right way, and at the right time, that we achieve the great triumphs of life.
Page 413 - ... should preach or write that there ought to be no commanders or officers, because all are equal in Christ, therefore no masters nor officers, no laws nor orders, no corrections nor punishments ; I say, I never denied, but in such cases, whatever is pretended, the commander or commanders may judge, resist, compel and punish such transgressors, according to their deserts and merits.
Page 371 - ... stony, but still youth; and the shadow darted forth and darkened over these phantoms as it had darkened over the last. Nothing now was left but the shadow, and on that my eyes were intently fixed, till again eyes grew out of the shadow - malignant, serpent eyes.
Page 405 - We maintain that in every compact between two or more parties, the obligation is mutual; that the failure of one of the contracting parties to perform a material part of the agreement, entirely releases the obligation of the other; and that where no arbiter is provided, each party is remitted to his own judgment to determine the fact of failure, with all its consequences.
Page 102 - ... in a community regulated only by laws of demand and supply, but protected from open violence, the persons who become rich are, generally speaking, industrious, resolute, proud, covetous, prompt, methodical, sensible, unimaginative, insensitive, and ignorant. The persons who remain poor are the entirely foolish, the entirely wise, the idle, the reckless, the humble, the thoughtful, the dull, the imaginative, the sensitive, the wellinformed, the improvident, the irregularly and impulsively wicked,...
Page 371 - For there, though in nought else around me, I was aware that there was a will, and a will of intense, creative, working evil, which might crush down my own. The pale atmosphere in the room began now to redden as if in the air of some near conflagration. The larvae grew lurid as things that live in fire.

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