The Genocide Convention: An International Law Analysis

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Routledge, Mar 9, 2016 - Political Science - 320 pages
The Genocide Convention explores the question of whether the law and genocide law in particular can prevent mass atrocities. The volume explains how genocide came to be accepted as a legal norm and analyzes the intent required for this categorization. The work also discusses individual suits against states for genocide and, finally, explores the utility of genocide as a legal concept.

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Contents

Calling to Account
21
GenocideS Legal Environment
61
Genocidal Intent
88
The Victims of Genocide
137
The Scale of Genocide
162
Techniques of Genocide
189
Genocide by a State
215
Why Genocide?
265
Appendix
285
Bibliography
291
Index
299
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Professor Quigley is Presidents' Club Professor of Law at the Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University, USA. He is active in international human rights work and his numerous publications include books and articles on human rights, the UN, war and peace, east European law, African law, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Professor Quigley served as an expert witness on the law of genocide in the first criminal prosecution charging genocide as defined by the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide.

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