Illustrated American Advertiser: The Historical Picture Gallery; Or, Scenes & Incidents in American History, a Collection of Interesting & Thrilling Narratives from the Written & Unwritten, Legendary & Traditionary, History of the United States, Volume 5

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D. Bigelow & Company, 1856

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Page 496 - From every account the enemy amounted to two thousand combatants; the troops actually engaged against them were short of nine hundred. This horde of savages with their allies abandoned themselves to flight, and dispersed with terror and dismay, leaving our victorious army in full and quiet possession of the field of battle, which terminated under the influence of the guns of the British garrison, as you will observe by the inclosed correspondence between Major Campbell, the commandant, and myself,...
Page 348 - Listen ! you told us at that time, to bring forward our families to this place, and we did so ; and you promised to take care of them, and they should want for nothing, while the men would go and fight the enemy ; that we need not trouble ourselves about the enemy's garrisons ; that we knew nothing about them, and that our father would attend to that part of the business. You also told your red children that you would take good care of your garrison here, which made our hearts glad.
Page 444 - Money is this man's God, and to get enough of it he would sacrifice his country" This publication produced quite a sensation among the officers.
Page 71 - I could not but reflect with pleasure on the situation of these people; and think if there is such a thing as happiness in this life, that they enjoy it. Far from the bustle of the world, they live in the most delightful climate, and richest soil imaginable; they are everywhere surrounded with beautiful prospects and sylvan scenes; lofty mountains, transparent streams, falls of water, rich valleys, and majestic woods; the whole interspersed with an infinite variety of flowering shrubs, constitute...
Page 287 - After some six weeks' fatting amongst those savage courtiers, at the minute of my execution, she hazarded the beating out of her own brains to save mine...
Page 496 - All these orders were obeyed with spirit and promptitude ; but such was the impetuosity of the charge by the first line of infantry...
Page 11 - I was once a boy ; then I saw the white man afar off. I hunted in these woods with a bow and arrow ; then with a rifle. I saw the white man and was told he was my enemy. I could not shoot him as I would a wolf or bear ; yet like these he came upon me ; horses, cattle, and fields he took from me.
Page 496 - Scott to gain and turn the right flank of the savages with the whole force of the mounted volunteers by a circuitous route ; at the same time I ordered the front line to advance and charge with trailed arms and rouse the Indians from their coverts at the point of the bayonet, and when up, to deliver a close and...
Page 288 - You did promise Powhatan what was yours should be his, and he the like to you; you called him father being in his land a stranger, and by the same reason so must I do you...
Page 348 - The Americans have not yet defeated us by land. Neither are we sure that they have done so by water. We therefore wish to remain here, and fight our enemy, should they make their appearance. If they defeat us, we will then retreat with our father. At the battle of the rapids, last war, the Americans certainly defeated us.

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