A Treatise on the Law, Privileges, Proceedings and Usage of Parliament

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Butterworths, 1883 - Parliamentary practice - 950 pages
 

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Contents

Causes of summons declared
48
Rights of Peers of the Realm
55
CHAPTER III
68
Power of commitment
74
Arrest under warrant of Chairman of Election Committee
81
Arrests without warrants
89
Frivolous complaints
108
Present modes of punishment
114
Petition of the Commons for freedom of speech
120
Publication of Parliamentary papers authorized by statute
126
Modification of privilege by statute
135
After a Dissolution
143
Members not admitted as bail
144
Privilege does not extend to Criminal Cases
151
Members fined for contempt of Court
160
Protection to counsel
167
Composition of the House of Lords 15
171
Authorities in opposition
173
Dissolution of Parliament 1 53
179
Contest concerning the publication of papers
189
Meeting of a New Parliament
195
Election of Speaker
199
One Oath substituted for former Oath
205
Penalties on omission to take the Oath
215
The Chiltern Hundreds PAGE 708
216
A Bill read pro formÔ
222
Every Member to attend the service of the House
228
Time of Meeting of both Houses
234
upon
237
Report to be brought up without Question
256
Clerk of the House
261
No Lord or Member to vote unless present when the Question
263
Duties of the SerjeantatArms
269
Precedence of Orders of the Day or Notices of Motions
275
Orders appointed for halfpast four
281
Motions without Notice
288
Votes of Thanks
294
Modes of evading or superseding a Question
300
Casual interruptions of Debate
307
Question put before conclusion of Debate
314
Different forms of Amendment
317
By leaving out words and by leaving out words and adding
324
Mr Speaker calls upon Members of the Commons to speak
343
Debate on Motion for Adjournment
350
241
353
Motions for adjournment before Public Business
356
Order in Debate
363
Offensive words against either House
371
Challenges a Breach of Privilege
377
1
381
Order in debate
383
4
385
Authority of Speaker in both Houses
390
CHAPTER XIII
427
i
441
CHAPTER XIV
446
Standing Committees
452
1
453
Or Members
474
Duty of Managers
493
CHAPTER XVII
502
Debates on restrained
619
Subjects of Returns
625
135
627
Deposited with the Clerk of the House
629
CHAPTER XV
635
Aids and Supplies not to be altered by the Lords
641
Financial inquiries by the Lords
647
Motions for grant of Money
653
And of Ways and Means
666
Questions and Amendments
672
Vote in Committee cannot be postponed
678
Propositions for reducing Charges entertained
684
Grants voted otherwise than in Committee of Supply
690
While Election Petitions are pending
696
Vacancies by Acceptance of Office under the Crown
703
Mode of appointment
709
Cumulative Offices
710
The present System
716
Proceedings of House upon determination of Election Trials
725
Commissions of Inquiry
731
The Managers and Trial
737
0
741
Bills of Attainder and of Pains and Penalties
744
THE MANNER OF PASSING PRIVATE BILLS
745
Religious communities
752
Private and Public Bills pass through the same stages
758
Artisans and Labourers Dwellings
765
Memorials complaining of Noncompliance
772
THE HOUSE OF COMMONS
780
Misrepresentation of their proceedings
802
1
809
3
817
Cases cited
834
0
837
Petitions not specific 9
840
Clause compelling payment of Subscription
846
Local Government
853
2
859
4
865
Reports and Special Reports
866
Bill considered as Amended
873
CHAPTER XI
878
Petitions for additional Provision
881
PROCEEDINGS IN THE LORDS UPON PRIVATE OR PERSONAL
891
Fees payable on Private Bills
900
INDEX
909
Chairman of Lords Committees
910
RULES OF DEBATE
913
Offer to influence a Committee
914
Secret Committees
916
437
917
Consequential Amendments
918
412
933
Questions a part of every Proceeding
936
Adjournment of Committees
938
Interference with officers
939
The Lords address the House
940
443
941
3
942
460
950

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Popular passages

Page 702 - House has met before that day, or will meet on the day of the issue), issue his warrant to the clerk of the Crown to make out a new writ for electing another member in the room of the member whose seat has so become vacant.
Page 5 - Will you, to the utmost of your power, maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion, established by law ? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges, as by law, do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them ?" King or Queen.
Page 82 - Jones) moved for a rule to show cause why there should not be a new trial on the ground of misdirection of the learned judge, and also on the ground that the verdict was against evidence.
Page 3 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this kingdom of England, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the laws and customs of the same?
Page 3 - And whereas the laws of England are the birthright of the people thereof, and all the kings and queens who shall ascend the throne of this realm ought to administer the government of the same according to the said laws, and all their officers and ministers ought to serve them respectively according to the same...
Page 26 - House of Parliament, to deprive many inconsiderable places of the right of returning members, to grant such privilege to large, populous, and wealthy towns, to increase the number of knights of the shire, to extend the elective franchise to many of His Majesty's subjects who have not heretofore enjoyed the same, and to diminish the expense of elections...
Page 722 - Ireland at the time elected, and not having declined to serve for any county, city, or borough of Great Britain, to concern himself in the election of members to serve for the Commons in Parliament...
Page 182 - That by the law and privilege of Parliament, this house has the sole and exclusive jurisdiction to determine upon the existence and extent of its privileges ; and that the institution or prosecution of any action, suit, or other proceeding, for the purpose of bringing them into discussion or decision before any court or tribunal elsewhere than in Parliament, is a high breach of such privilege, and renders all parties concerned therein amenable to its just displeasure, and to the punishment consequent...
Page 12 - Scotland and their successors to their honours and dignities shall from and after the union be peers of Great Britain and have rank and precedency next and immediately after the peers of the like orders and degrees in England at the time of the union...
Page 123 - That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.

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