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Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard.

WASHINGTON, October 12, 1887.

(Received October 13.) SIR: In connection with the representation which I was instructed to make to you respecting the seizure of the British schooners Onward, Carolina, and Thornton, by the United States cruiser Coruin, in Behring's Sea, I have the honor to inform you that I am now further instructed to make similar representations in the cases of the British Columbian vessels Grace, Dolphin, and W. P. Sayward, seized lately by the United States revenue-cutter Richard Rush, and at the same time, as in the cases of the Onward, Carolina, and Thornton, to reserve all rights to compensation on behalf of the owners and crews.

I am also instructed to point out to you that according to the deposition of the mate of the W. P. Sayward, a copy of which is inclosed, no seals had been taken by her crew in Behring's Sea, as is alleged in the libels of information filed on behalf of the United States district attorney in the district court of Alaska. I have, etc.,

L. S. SACKVILLE WEST. (For inclosure see Senate Ex. Doc. No. 106, Fiftieth Congress, second session, p. 56.)

Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackville West.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 13, 1887. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge your note of yesterday, in relation to the cases of seizure of the British schooners Onward, Carolina, and Thornton, in Behring Sea, by United States revenue vessels, in August, 1886, and also your instructions to include by similar representations the cases of the British Columbian vessels Grace, Dolphin, and W. P. Sayward, seized by the United States revenue authorities in Beliring Sea, with notification that Her Britannic Majesty's Government reserves all right to compensation on behalf of the owners and crews of the above-mentioned vessels. The affidavit of the mate of the W. P. Sayward has been read, and the facts therein stated will be at once investigated. I have, etc.,

T. F. BAYARD.

Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard.

WASHINGTON, October 19, 1887. (Received October 21.) SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I am instructed by the Marquis of Salisbury, Her Majesty's principal secretary of state for foreign affairs, to protest against the seizure of the Canadian vessel Alfred Adams, in Behring Seas, and against the continuation of similar proceedings by the United States authorities on the high seas. I have, etc.,

L. S. SACKVILLE WEST.

Mr. Bayard to Sir L. S. Sackrille West.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 22, 1887. SIR: I had the honor of receiving last evening your note of the 19th instant, conveying the instruction to you by the Marquis of Salisbury that you should protest against the seizure of the Canadian vessel Alfred Adams in Behring Sea, and against the continuance of similar proceedings by the United States authorities on the high seas; and I have, etc.,

T. F. BAYARD.

Sir L. S. Sackville West to Mr. Bayard.

WASHINGTON, October 26, 1887. (Received October 27.) SIR: With reference to my note of the 19th instant, protesting against the seizure of the British schooner Alfred Adams, I have the honor to transmit to you herewith copy of the report of the Canadian minister of marine and fisheries and other papers relating thereto. I have, etc.,

L. S. SACKVILLE WEST. (For inclosure, see Senate Ex. Doc. No. 106, 50th Congress, 2d session, pp. 59-64. In this document will also be found further correspondence relating to the foregoing subject.)

CORRESPONDENCE RELATIVE TO PROPOSED INTERNATIONAL

MEASURES FOR THE PROTECTION OF FUR-SEALS.

FRANCE.
Mr. Bayard to Mr. Vignaud.

No. 256.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, August 19, 1887. SIR: Recent occurrences have drawn the attention of this Department to the necessity of taking steps for the better protection of the fur-seal fisheries in Behring Sea.

Without raising any question as to the exceptional measures which the peculiar character of the property in question might justify this Government in taking, and without reference to any exceptional marine jurisdiction that might properly be claimed for that end, it is deemed advisable—and I am instructed by the President so to inform you-to attain the desired ends by international coöperation.

It is well known that the unregulated and indiscriminate killing of seals in many parts of the world has driven them from place to place, and, by breaking up their habitual resorts, has greatly reduced their number.

Under these circumstances, and in view of the common interest of all nations in preventing the indiscriminate destruction and consequent

Identic instructions were sent to the United States ministers to Germany. Great Britain, Japan, Russia, and Sweden and Norway.

extermination of an animal which contributes so importantly to the commercial wealth and general use of mankind, you are hereby instructed to draw the attention of the Government to which you are accredited to the subject, and to invite it to enter into such an arrangement with the Government of the United States as will prevent the citizens of either country from killing seal in Behring Sea at such times and places, and by such methods as at present are pursued, and which threaten the speedy extermination of those animals and consequent serious loss to mankind.

The ministers of the United States to Germany, Sweden and Norway, Russia, Japan, and Great Britain have been each similarly addressed on the subject referred to in this instruction. I am, etc.,

T. F. BAYARD.

Mr. McLane to Mr. Bayard.

No. 490.)

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Paris, October 22, 1887. (Received November 11.): SIR: Referring to your No. 256, of August 19, instructing Mr. Vig. naud to draw the attention of the French Government to the necessity of taking steps for the better protection of the fur-seal tisheries in Behring Sea, with a view of obtaining its coöperation with the United States in measures intended to reach that end, I have to state that Mr. Flourens is willing to consider favorably any project of international arrangement you may be disposed to submit concerning the matter.

I inclose herewith a translation of a note received from Mr. Flourens which explains his view. The note of September 17, to which he refers, is simply an acknowledgment. I have, etc.,

ROBERT M. McLANE.

(Inclosure with No. 490.–Translation.]

Mr. Flourens to Mr. McLane.

Paris, October 21, 1887. Sir: Mr. Vignaud was good enough to inform me on the 31st of August last that the United States Government was desirous of consulting with the principal nations interested, with the view of making regulations in regard to the seal fisheries in Behring Strait.

Referring to my communication of the 17th September last, I have the honor to inform you that, although the industry in question has not been engaged in by French shipowners up to the present time, the Government of the Republie is not the less disposed to confer for that purpose with the Government of the United States and to examine any draft of an international convention which may be communicated to it by the Cabinet at Washington.

I will be obliged to you if you will be kind enough to transmit this reply to the American Governmekt. Accept, etc.,

FLOURENS.

Mr. Bayard to Mr. McLean. No. 271.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, November 18, 1887. SIR: I have to acknowledge your No. 490, of the 22d ultimo, transmitting copy of a note of the 21st of October from Mr. Flourens, informing this Government of the willingness of the French Republic, though there are not many French ships engaged in the seal fisheries, to confer with us or to examine any draft of a convention intended to regulate those tisheries in Behring Straits.

This response of the French Government to our invitation is very satisfactory, and in due time further instructions on the subject will be sent you. I am, etc.,

T. F. BAYARD.

Mr. Bayard to Mr. McLane. No. 293.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 7, 1888. SIR: I inclose herewith, for your information, two printed copies of an instruction of this date to E.J. Phelps, Esquire, United States minister at London, in response to a dispatch from him, in which it was stated that Lord Salisbury had expressed acquiescence in a proposal made by me for an agreement between the United States and Great Britain in regard to the adoption of concurrent regulations for the preservation of fur seals in Belring Sea from extermination by destruction at improper seasons and by improper methods by the citizens of either country. I am, etc.,

T. F. BAYARD.

GERMANY.

Mr. Coleman to Mr. Bayard. No. 498.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Berlin, September 1, 1887. (Received September 17.) SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a note I have to-day addressed to the foreign office in execution of your instruction No. 246, of the 19th ultimo, relating to the necessity of measures being adopted for the better protection of the fur-seal fisheries in Behring Sea. I have, etc.,

CHAPMAN COLEMAN.

[Inclosure with Mr. Coloman's No. 498.)

Mr. Coleman to Count von Berchem.
No. 311.]
LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Berlin, September 1, 1887. The undersigned, chargé d'affaires ad interim of the United States of America, has the honor, acting under instructions from his Government, to inform Count von Ber

? Identic instructions were sent to the United States ministers to Germany, Russia, and Sweden and Norway.

2 See infra, p. 172; sec also Senate Ex. Doc. No. 106, Fiftieth Congress, second session, p. 88.

chem, under secretary of state in charge of the imperial foreign office, that recent occurrences have drawn the attention of that Government to the necessity of taking steps for the better protection of the fur-seal fisheries in Behring Sea.

Without raising any question as to the exceptional measures which the peculiar character of the property in question might justify the Government of the United States in taking, and without reference to any exceptional marine jurisdiction that inight properly be claimed for that end, it has been deemed advisable to seek to attain the desired ends by international coöperation.

It is well known that the unregulated and indiscriminate killing of seals in many parts of the world has driven them from place to place, and by breaking up their habitual resorts has greatly reduced their number.

Under these circumstances and in view of the common interest of all nations in preventing the indiscriminate destruction and consequent extermination of an animal which contributes so importantly to the commercial wealth and general use of mankind, the Government of the United States has instructed the undersigned to present the subject to the attention of the Imperial Government, and to invite it to enter into such an arrangement with the Government of the United States as will prevent the citizens of either country from killing seals in Behring Sea at such times and places, and by such methods as at present are pursued, and which threaten the speedy extermination of those animals and consequent serious loss to mankind.

The undersigned begs to add that he has been informed by his Government that the ministers of the United States to Sweden and Norway, Russia, France, Great Britain, and Japan have been each similarly addressed on the subject referred to, and avails himself, etc.

CHAPMAN COLEMAN.

GREAT BRITAIN.

Mr. Phelps to Mr. Bayard.

No. 618.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

London, November 12, 1887. (Received November 22.) SIR: Referring to your instructions numbered 685, of August 19, 1887, I have now to say that owing to the absence from London of Lord Salisbury, secretary of state for foreign affairs, it has not been in my power to obtain his attention to the subject until yesterday.

I had then an interview with him, in which I proposed on the part of the Government of the United States that by mutual agreement of the two Governments a code of regulations should be adopted for the preservation of the seals in Behring Sea from destruction at improper times and by improper means by the citizens of either country; such agreement to be entirely irrespective of any questions of conflicting jurisdiction in those waters.

His lordship promptly acquiesced in this proposal on the part of Great Britain and suggested that I should obtain from my Government and submit to him a sketch of a system of regulations which would be adequate for the purpose.

I have therefore to request that I may be furnished as early as possible with a draft of such a code as in your judgment should be adopted.

I would suggest also that copies of it be furnished at the same time to the ministers of the United States in Germany, Sweden and Norway, Russia, France, and Japan, in order that it may be under consideration by the Governments of those countries. A mutual agreement between all the Governments interested may thus be reached at an early day. I have, etc.,

E. J. PHELPS.

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