Some Account of the Life, Writings, and Speeches of William Pinkney

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J. W. Palmer & Company, 1826 - Lawyers - 616 pages
 

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Page 187 - ... when a new and troubled scene is opened, and the file affords no precedent, then it is that a greater knowledge of mankind, and a far more extensive comprehension of things is requisite than ever office gave, or than office can ever give.
Page 460 - We shall have neutrality, soft and gentle and defenceless in herself, yet clad in the panoply of her warlike neighbors; with the frown of defiance upon her brow, and the smile of conciliation upon her lip ; with the spear of Achilles in one hand, and a lying protestation of innocence and helplessness unfolded in the other. Nay, if I may be allowed so bold a figure, in a mere legal discussion, we shall have the branch of olive entwined around the bolt of Jove, and neutrality in the act of hurling...
Page 2 - Congress of the United States, entitled "an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the time therein mentioned." And also to an act entitled "an act supplementary to an act entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the...
Page 598 - But let us proceed to take a rapid glance at the reasons which have been assigned for this notion that involuntary servitude and a republican form of government are perfect antipathies. The gentleman from New Hampshire* has defined a republican government to be that in which all the men participate in its power and privileges: from whence it follows that where there are slaves, it can have no existence.
Page 573 - West, this obscure foundling of a wilderness that was but yesterday the hunting ground of the savage, is to find her way into the American family as she can, with an humiliating badge of remediless inferiority patched upon her garments, with the mark of recent, qualified manumission upon her, or rather with a brand upon her forehead to tell the story of her territorial vassalage, and to perpetuate the memory of her evil propensities. It is now avowed that, while the robust district of Maine is to...
Page 225 - It is agreed that in all such Cases where adequate Compensation cannot for whatever reason be now actually obtained, had and received by the said Merchants and others in the ordinary course of Justice, full and Complete Compensation for the same will be made by the British Government to the said Complainants.
Page 597 - They have cut themselves off from all chance of a convenient distinction in or out of that treaty, by insisting that slavery beyond the old United States is rejected by the constitution, and by the law of God, as discoverable by the aid of either reason or revelation ; and moreover, that the treaty does not include the case, and if it did, could not make it better. They have therefore completely discredited their own theory by their own practice, and left us no theory worthy of being seriously controverted....
Page 578 - ... pioneer for others of a more desolating aspect. It is that fatal bridge of which Milton speaks ; and when once firmly built, what shall hinder you to pass it when you please for the purpose of plundering power after power, at the expense of new states, as you will still continue to call them, and raising up prospective codes irrevocable and immortal, which shall leave to those states the empty shadows of domestic sovereignty, and convert them into petty pageants...
Page 579 - The pruritas leges ferendi is a universal disease; and conditions are laws as far as they go. The vanity of human wisdom, and the presumption of human reason, are proverbial. This vanity and this presumption are often neither reasonable nor wise. Humanity, too, sometimes plays fantastic tricks with power. Time, moreover, is fruitful in temptations to convert discretionary power to all sorts of purposes. Time, that withers the strength of man, and "strews around him like autumnal leaves the ruins...
Page 582 - Union it is to be bound by a contract degrading and diminishing its sovereignty, and is to be stripped of rights which the original parties to the Union did not consent to abandon, and which that Union (so far as depends upon it) takes under its protection and guarantee. Is the right to hold slaves a right which Massachusetts enjoys?

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