Which World?: Scenarios For The 21St Century

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Island Press, Feb 2, 2000 - Political Science - 320 pages
In Which World?, scientist Allen Hammond imaginatively probes the consequences of present social, economic, and environmental trends to construct three possible worlds that could await us in the twenty-first century: Market World, in which economic and human progress is driven by the liberating power of free markets and human initiative; Fortress World, in which unattended social and environmental problems diminish progress, dooming hundreds of millions of humans to lives of rising conflict and violence; and Transformed World, in which human ingenuity and compassion succeed in offering a better life, not just a wealthier one, and in seeking to extend those benefits to all of humanity.
 

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Which World?: Scenarios for the 21st Century

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Hammond (director, Strategic Analysis, World Resources Inst.) bases the title of this work on the results of the 2050 Project, a joint research program of the Brookings Institution, the World ... Read full review

Contents

French Diplomacy in the War of 191418 I
1
The Peace Settlement II
11
From Versailles to the Ruhr
26
The Occupation of the Ruhr and the Dawes Plan
47
The Briand Era
69
The Problem of National Defence after the Evacuation
93
The World Economic Crisis and its Repercussions
100
The Disarmament Conference and the Rearming
117
NonIntervention and Attempt
214
Munich
221
The Beginning of the War
233
Woe to the Vanquished
246
Select Bibliography
354
Preface ix
Chapter 1
Chapter 2

The FrancoItalian Rapprochement and the Attempt
132
The FrancoSoviet Treaty of Mutual Assistance
155
The Abyssinia Conflict and the Remilitarization
173
The Foreign Policy of the Popular Front
195
The Belgian Defection
202
FrancoSoviet Relations
208
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
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About the author (2000)

Allen Hammond is senior scientist and director of strategic analysis at the World Resources Institute, a nonpartisan policy research center based in Washington, D.C. He received his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University, and he has published nine books and many scientific articles, as well as numerous articles and columns in newspapers and popular magazines.

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