Select Charters and Other Illustrations of English Constitutional History: From the Earliest Times to the Reign of Edward the First

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William Stubbs
Clarendon Press, 1905 - Constitutional history - 554 pages
 

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Page 526 - ... damnable doctrine and position, That princes excommunicated or deprived by the pope, or any authority of the see of Rome, may be deposed or murdered by their subjects, or any other whatsoever. And I do declare, That no foreign prince, person, prelate, state or potentate hath, .or ought to have any Jurisdiction, power, superiority, pre-eminence, or authority ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this realm: So help me God.
Page 524 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of Parliament, is against law; 7.
Page 517 - Mnjeety, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...
Page 528 - An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown, and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject...
Page 516 - ... divers of your subjects have of late been imprisoned without any cause showed, and when for their deliverance they were brought before your Justices, by your Majesty's writs of Habeas Corpus, there to undergo and receive as the Court should order, and their keepers commanded to certify the causes of their detainer ; no cause was certified, but that they were detained by your Majesty's special command...
Page 515 - Statutum de tallagio non concedendo, that no tallage or aid shall be laid or levied by the King or his heirs in this realm, without the good will and assent of the Archbishops, Bishops, Earls, Barons, Knights, Burgesses, and other the freemen of the commonalty of this realm...
Page 515 - ... your subjects have inherited this freedom, that they should not be compelled to contribute to any tax, tallage, aid, or other like charge, not set by common consent in Parliament: II.
Page 528 - ... for preserving a certainty in the succession thereof, in and upon which the unity, peace, tranquillity and safety of this nation doth under God wholly consist and depend, the said Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons do beseech their Majesties...
Page 516 - And whereas of late great companies of soldiers and mariners have been dispersed into divers counties of the realm, and the inhabitants against their wills have been compelled to receive them into their houses, and there to suffer them to sojourn, against the laws and customs of this realm, and to the great grievance and vexation of the people.
Page 525 - That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

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