Page images
PDF
EPUB

GENOA AND VENICE.

URING

this

period, GENOA entered

into various commercial treaties with England, which were often renewed; as may be seen

1316

to

1460.

1409 1506.

Rym. Fæd. vol. v. p. 569-703. vol. x. p. 115-23. vol. xi. p. 441.

1748. 18 Oct.

In thefe years England granted a free trade, a pardon, and particular privileges, to the Venetians; as may be seen

Rym. Fad. vol. viii. P. 601-2.
vol. xiii. p. 161.

1713.

Genoa and Venice were particularly comJuly. prehended in the treaty of Utrecht, between Great Britain and Spain.

See the treaty, vol. ii. p. 40—107.

Genoa was a party to the treaty of Aix-laChapelle. Pap. Off. M. 1-3.

See the treaty, vol. i. art. FRANCE..

My enquiries have not discovered any commercial or other treaties between Great Britain and Venice, or Genoa, in modern times, though Venice has fometimes propofed a commercial treaty; as may be feenBoard of Trade, L. 84, M. 9198-208. P. 9-10-35

[blocks in formation]

1655. 19 Jan.

MOROCCO.

1714. 22 July,

1728. 14 Jan.

1729. 10 July.

1734. 15 Dec.

1750. 15 Jan.

1721.

The treaty of peace between Great Britain 23 Jan. and Morocco.

RTICLES of peace between Great
Britain and Morocco.
Pap. Off. U. 11,

A

The treaty of peace, friendship, and commerce, between Great Britain and Morocco, made at Tetuan.

Pap. Off. U. 26.

The articles of peace and commerce between Great Britain and Morocco.

Treat. 1732, vol. iv. p. 457.
Treat. 1785, vol. ii. p. 302.

The additional articles of peace and commerce between Great Britain and Morocco,

made at Fez.

Pap. Off. U. 30.

The treaty of peace between Great Britain and Morocco.

The treaty of peace and friendship between Great Britain and Morocco.

Treat. 1785, vol. iii. p. 5.

1751.

and com

The additional articles of peace Į Feb, merce between Great Britain and Morocco,

Treat, 1785, vol. iii. p. 8.

1760. 28 July.

The treaty of peace and commerce between Great Britain and Morocco, concluded at Fez.

1783. The additional articles of friendship and 24 May. commerce between Great Britain and Mo

rocco.

[The following is printed from the treaty which was published by authority in 1763.]

Treaty of Peace and Commerce between the King of Great Britain and the Emperor of Morocco, in 1763.

GEORGE the Third, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Chriftian faith, Duke of Brunfwic and Lunenbourg, Arch-treasurer and Prince Elector of the Holy Roman empire, &c. to all to whom these presents fhall come, greeting. Whereas a treaty of peace and commerce was concluded and figned at the court of Fez, on the 28th day of July 1760, between our late Royal grandfather of glorious and happy memory, and the High, Glorious, Powerful, and moft Noble Monarch, Sidi Mahomet Ben Abdalla, Emperor and King of the kingdoms of Fez and Morocco, Trafilet, Sus, and all the Algarbe, and its territories in Africa, &c. by our trusty and well-beloved Mark Milbanke, Efquire, on the part of our faid late Royal grandfather, and by the faid Emperor of Fez and Morocco, in the words and form following:

[ocr errors]

Articles of peace and commerce, made between the High and Glorious, Powerful, and moft Noble Monarch, Sidi Mahomet Ben Abdalla, Emperor and King of the kingdoms of Fez and Morocco, Trafilet, Sus, and all the Algarbe, and its territories in Africa, &c. and the most High and Famous Monarch, George the Second,

Z 4

Second, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Christian faith, Duke of Brunfwic and Lunenburg, Arch-treasurer and Prince Elector of the Holy Roman Empire, &c. concluded, agreed, and adjusted by the faid Emperor of Fez and Morocco, and by the Noble Mark Milbanke, Efquire, on the part of his Britannic Majefty.

I. It is agreed and concluded, that, from this time forward, there fhall be between his Majefty of Great Britain, and the Emperor of Fez and Morocco, their heirs and fucceffors, a general, true, and perfect peace for ever, as well by land as by fea and fresh-waters; and also between their lands, kingdoms, dominions, and territories belonging to or under the jurifdiction of either of them; and that their refpective fubjects, people, or inhabitants, of whatever condition, degree, or quality they be, fhall reciprocally fhew to each other all friendship; and that, on the demife of either of their Majefties, the fucceffor fhall fend an ambaffador to the other, to notify his acceffion to the throne.

II. It is alfo agreed, that all English fhips of war, and merchant fhips, that fhall come to any part of the Emperor's dominions to trade, or for any other purpofe, and shall have on board a cargo, which shall not be faleable in the faid place where they come, may depart with the fame to any other part whatsoever of the Emperor's dominions, and shall not pay the duties for it more than once; and that no duty shall be paid for implements of war, fuch as fire-arms, swords, or any other thing whatsoever which may belong to the military; neither for all forts of materials used for building ships; and that, if any English ship shall come to any of the Emperor's ports with merchandize deftined for another part of the world, they are not to pay any duty for fuch merchandize, fo that they may depart with the fame without any moleftation. If any

English

English fhip fhall be thrown upon the Emperor's coafts, by bad weather or otherwife, the fame fhall be protected, and depart again in fafety, without any illtreatment or interruption. And the Emperor's fhips, which fhall be thrown on the coast of Great Britain, or dominions thereunto belonging, fhall be treated in the fame manner.

III. It is alfo agreed, that all fhips belonging to the fubjects of the said King of Great Britain, and of the Emperor of Fez and Morocco, and his fubjects, may fecurely navigate and pafs the feas, without being fearched, or receiving hinderance or trouble the one from the other; and that all perfons and paffengers, of whatever nation they may be, belonging to either of the parties, shall be entirely free, without being detained, molested, robbed, or receiving any damage from the others. And moreover, it is agreed, that the English fhips, which fhall be freighted in any port of the Emperor of Fez and Morocco, for other ports of the fame kingdom, fhall not be obliged to pay the ufual port charges; and that no captain or other perfon belonging to any fhip or veffel of the Emperor of Fez and Morocco, or his fubjects, fhall take any perfon or perfons whatsoever, out of any fhip or veffel of the King of Great Britain, or his fubjects, in order to be examined, or under any other pretence whatsoever; neither fhall they offer violence to any perfon or perfons, of whatever nation or quality they be, on board a ship belonging to his Majefty's fubjects.

IV. It is befides agreed, for the better obfervance of the preceding articles, according to their true intent, that the fhips of war or cruizers belonging to the Emperor of Fez and Morocco, or to his fubjects, meeting with any fhips or other veffels of the King of Great Britain, or his fubjects (not being in the feas belonging to his Majesty's dominions) may fend a fingle boat on board, with two trufty rowers, and no more, who may enter fuch fhips or veffels; that on fhewing them a

paffport,

« PreviousContinue »