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WITH AN INDEX AND THE RULES.

"One of the great mischiefs in Ireland, I think, is that it seems
granted that MAN is a nuisance."-O'Connell.

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R. D. WEBB AND SON, 74, ABBEY-STREET;

W. H. SMITH AND SON, 85 & 86, ABBEY-STREET.

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PREFACE.

Property is a social institution, both in its origin and its destination." AUGUSTE COMTE.

THE main object of this work is neither praise nor criticism, but utility. It consists of two parts, an Introduction and a Practical Analysis. The former points out the leading principles of the Land Act of 1870, and submits the interpretation, which the writer deems necessary to secure its just and beneficial operation. The latter will, it is hoped, assist both landed proprietors and tenant farmers to ascertain their privileges, claims, and obligations under the same Act, in reference to tenure and purchase.

I think it is unreasonable to suppose that a complete and final settlement could be accomplished, by a single effort, of a problem which, like the IRISH LAND QUESTION, has during the last quarter of a century engaged the attention of six Prime Ministers and ten Governments. The Act of 1870 is unquestionably a great advance upon all previous governmental proposals, and is notably superior to the Bill of 1866. This was sanctioned by the Irish members who were the advanced Liberals of that date; but neither embraced Ulster Tenant Right, nor recognised, even indirectly, possessory claims, nor protected the tenant's property in retrospective improvements. But this very superiority, the rapid result of an acknowledged political urgency, much more than of any well-grounded deliberate change in public opinion, of England more especially, itself rather strengthens the presumption that the Act of 1870, however surprising as an effort of Imperial legislation, does not completely meet the real wants and just requirements of Ireland. Such is, I believe, the fact, and I

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