Remarks on the Present Position of the Church of Scotland: Occasioned by the Publication of a Letter from the Dean of Faculty to the Lord Chancellor

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William Collins, 1839 - Church and state - 130 pages
 

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Page 19 - That their hearts might be comforted, being knit together in love, and unto all riches of the full assurance of understanding, to the acknowledgment of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ ; 3 In whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.
Page 125 - The Lord Jesus, as King and Head of his Church, hath therein appointed a government, in the hand of Church officers, distinct from the civil magistrate.
Page 90 - ... or to a preaching station, with its correspondent home-walk of Christian usefulness among the families of the surrounding poor, as the likeliest passage to a higher place in their profession, even as it is the best preparation for the duties of their high calling. And not only is there the visible glow of this great and wholesome reform abroad over the country, or in the outer department of the Church, but in the business of its courts and judicatories, in the General Assembly itself, there is...
Page 12 - Assembly further declare it to be their opinion that the dissent of a majority of the male heads of families, resident within the parish, being members of the congregation, and in communion with the church at least two years previous to the day of moderation...
Page 113 - To what position then are we brought if we give in to the opposite motion, and proceed in consequence to the ordination of Mr. Young ? To such a position as the bishops of England, with all the Erastianism which has been charged, and to a great degree I think falsely charged, upon that Establishment, never, never would consent to occupy. Many of them would go to the prison and the death rather than submit to such an invasion on the functions of the sacred office. We read of an old imprisonment of...
Page 12 - Church, at least two years previous to the day of moderation, whether such dissent shall be expressed with or without the assignment of reasons, ought to be of conclusive effect in setting aside the presentee (under the patron's nomination^, save and except where it is clearly established, by the patron, presentee, or any of the minority, that the said dissent is founded in corrupt and malicious combination, or not truly founded on any objection personal to the presentee in regard to his ministerial...
Page 113 - Sir, — I am directed by Lord Melbourne to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th instant, and to inform you that his Lo'rdship cannot advise the King to give any command for controlling the judgment of a bishop on the subject of ordination to holy orders. "I am Sir, your obedient humble Servant, "SM PHILLIPS. "James Abbott, Esq. )
Page 113 - ... both as spiritual acts; but by the practice of the Church of England, the two are separated in point of time from each other, and as they look only upon the ordination as spiritual, this lays them open to such civil mandates and civil interdicts, as we have never been accustomed to receive in the questions which arise on the subject of induction into parishes. But ask any English ecclesiastic, whether the Bishop would receive an order from any civil court whatever on the matter of ordination;...
Page 113 - ... universal reply is, that he would not. In other words, we should be degraded far beneath the level of the sister Church if we remain in connexion with the State, and submit to this new ordinance, or if you will, to this new interpretation of their old ordinances. I hold in my hands a book entitled a History of the Romish and English Hierarchies, by James Abbott, AB of Queen's College, Cambridge. He was refused ordination by the Bishop of Norwich, and afterwards by the Archbishop of Canterbury,...
Page 113 - ... receive in the questions which arise on the subject of induction into parishes. But ask any English ecclesiastic, whether the Bishop would receive an order from any civil court whatever on the matter of ordination ; and the instant, the universal reply is, that he would not. In other words, we should be degraded far beneath the level of the sister Church if we remain in connexion with the State, and submit to this new ordinance, or if you will, to this new interpretation of their old ordinances.

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