Report of the Commissioner of Education Made to the Secretary of the Interior for the Year ... with Accompanying Papers, Volume 1

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1896 - Education
 

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Contents

PART I
3
Oklahoma 1245
4
STATISTICAL REVIEW OF SECONDARY EDUCATION
33
CHAPTER XIV
35
Stadents and studies
43
Equipment and incomo
49
Distribution of students
51
Public and private secondary students
61
Tables 37 Students pursuing certain studies
67
Schools instructors and students
74
Statistics for 189293 of public high schools which failed to report in 189394 1920
75
Equipment and income
81
Tables 2124 Summary of statistics of public and private high schools
88
STATISTICAL REVIEW OF HIGHER EDUCATION
97
64
106
Colleges for women Division B 2036
130
Colleges of agriculture and the mechanic arts
134
Technological schools 2044
140
Normal schools
146
GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND
165
Evening schools
171
Industrial schools and juvenilo crimo
182
Primary schools classification and supply
189
Training of teachers
197
Page
203
The commonschool teachers of Prussia
223
History and development of the commonschool system of Berlin 215
245
Attendance in secondary schools for boys in Germany
298
German bibliography of the history and methods of arithmetic
311
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION IN ITALY
325
The auministration of public instruction
332
Sormal schools 315
338
Schools of dentistry 2051
361
Miscellaneous schools
368
Summary and conclusion
378
EDUCATION IN RUSSIA
385
Schools for training nurses 2056
389
General supervision of schools 301
391
Elncational and charitable work
401
Memorable dates
410
THE PSYCHOLOGICAL REVIVAL
425
The old psychology versus the new by W T Harris United States Commissioner of Education
433
Psychology in universities by Dr G Stanley Hall 415
450
Difference between clementary and secondary studios
513
Correlation by synthesis of studies
520
Methods and organization
529
The organization of city school systems
543
VERBATIM REPORTS OF RECITATIONS IN ARITHMETIC AND LANGUAGE IN
557
Reports of recitations in language
595
CHAPTER XV
617
Introduction The American common school
639
Arizona from report of superintendent of public instruction 1351
653
The beginnings of the American common school in New Eugland 618
674
Popular education in the Central American colonies before the Revolution
694
The epoch of the Revolution and establishment of the National Government 17751800
708
CHAPTER XVII
739
NAME REGISTER
773
District of Columbia free textbooks and supplies 1366
774
Presidents of colleges for males and of coeclucational colleges of liberal arts
781
PART II
791
The Teaching of Agriculture address by William T Harris United States Commissioner
801
CHAPTER II
809
CHAPTER III
819
Minnesota 1389
836
North Dakota 1411
843
Virginia 1458
849
Statistics of colleges in wlich geology is tanght length of time equipment etc
852
Summary of statistics of colleges in which geology is taught
870
Its rise and progress
877
The organization of manual training schools
909
The Mechanic Arts High School of Boston 017
917
Manual Training IIigh School of Denver
920
Manual Training High School of Louisville Ky
926
Cost per pupil per year
934
Occupations of graduates of the Baltimore Manual Training School
949
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
973
Schools of theology 2060
978
Medical schools
980
Nurse training
988
Law schools
994
CHAPTER VIII
1019
Statistics of schools for the education of the colorecl race
1029
Bibliography of negro education
1038
Introlactory notes 1003
1044
Florida 1152
1050
Wisconsin 1199
1057

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 682 - That a school or schools shall be established by the legislature for the convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters, paid by the public, as may enable them to instruct at low prices ; and all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted in one or more universities.
Page 709 - ... to countenance and inculcate the principles of humanity and general benevolence, public and private charity, industry and frugality, honesty and punctuality in their dealings; sincerity, good humor, and all social affections, and generous sentiments among the people.
Page 709 - ... it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates, in all future periods of this commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them; especially the university at Cambridge, public schools and grammar schools in the towns...
Page 652 - And it is further ordered, that where any town shall increase to the number of one hundred families or householders, they shall set up a grammar school, the master thereof being able to instruct youth so far as they may be fitted for the University...
Page 654 - The property of this commonwealth is pledged for the education of all its youth, up to such a point as will save them from poverty and vice, and prepare them for the adequate performance of their social and civil duties.
Page 717 - The arts and sciences shall be promoted in one or more seminaries of learning...
Page 785 - Territory shall be twenty-five thousand dollars, to be applied only to instruction in agriculture, the mechanic arts, the English language and the various branches of mathematical, physical, natural and economic science, with special reference to their applications in the industries of life, and to the facilities for such instruction...
Page 674 - Here lies our Sovereign Lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 674 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Page 725 - By that part of our plan which prescribes the selection of the youths of genius from among the classes of the poor, we hope to avail the State of those talents which nature has sown as liberally among the poor as the rich, but which perish without use, if not sought for and cultivated.

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