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suffered was not ascertained, but from all appearances, she must have been terribly hulled and cut to pieces.

The Globe hauled off to repair damages, and the Algerine seemed unwilling to renew the conflict, so that both parties probably esteemed it a drawn battle, and accordingly separated.

CHAPTER IV.

DESPERATE BATTLE BETWEEN THE PRIVATEER GENERAL ARMSTRONG, CAPTAIN CHAMP

LIN, AND A BRITISH FRIGATE-A CRUISE IN THE PRIVATEER-BRIG YANKEE-BRIG ANN, A PRIZE TO THE SNAP-DRAGON-SEVERAL PRIZES BY THE SAUCY JACK, OF CHARLESTON-HOW PRIVATEERS MANAGE TO TAKE MERCHANT VESSELS OUT OF A FLEET ---A COUP-DE-MAIN-EXPLOSION OF A PRIVATEER-PRIVATEER WASP CAPTURED, AFTER A RUNNING FIGHT OF NINE HOURS-A VALUABLE PRIZE BY THE PRIVATEER

SXAP-DRAGON-BRAVE DEFENCE OF THE SCHOOXER LOTTERY-A GALLANT ACTIOX

BY THE PRIVATEER DOLPHIN, CAPTAIN STAFFORD, OFF CAPE ST. VINCENT, WITH AN ENGLISH SHIP AND A BRIG-HE CAPTURES THEM BOTH-PATRIOTISM OF THE CITY OF BALTIMORE—INTERESTING CRUISE OF THE FAMOUS CAPTAIN BOYLE, ON THE COAST OF BRAZIL AND AMONG THE WEST INDIA ISLANDS.

FROM A CHARLESTON PAPER OF APRIL 5TH.

UNEQUALLED BRAVERY.—Arrived at this port, yesterday, the privateer-schooner Gen. Armstrong, Guy R. Champlin, Esq., commander, of New York, from a cruise. The following is an extract from her log-book :

March 11th, 1813.—These twenty-four hours commence with moderate breezes and cloudy weather. At half-past 5 A.M., tacked to the southward and eastward. At 7 discovered a sail bearing S.S.E. At half-past 7 discovered her to be at anchor under the land. At 8, she got under way, half-past 8, she got sail on her, and stood to the northward ; she fired three guns at us and hoisted English colors. We were then in five fathoms water, and about five leagues to the eastward of the mouth of Surinam river. At ten minutes past 9, we fired the centre gun and hoisted American colors. At forty-five minutes after, she tacked and stood as near us as the wind would permit, keeping up a brisk fire on us from her main-deck guns. At a quarter-past 10, we standing to the northward, and having the advantage of reconnoitering her with our spy-glasses, were of opinion she was a British letter-of-marque, and unanimously agreed to bear down and board. At half-past 10, put our helm up, and bore down on her with intention to give her our starboard broadside, and to wear ship, and give her our larboard broadside, which was all ready for the purpose, and board her. This was all done with the exception of boarding; we found she was a frigate, pierced for fourteen guns on the main-deck, six on the quarter-deck, and four on the forecastle; she had her starboard tacks on board. The wind being light, and keeping up a constant fire, our vessel lay ten minutes like a log; we shot away her foretopsail tie, and her mizzengaff halyards, which brought her colors down, and her inizzen and main-stay. We thought she had struck, and ceased firing, but we soon saw her colors flying again. We recommenced the action. She lay for a few minutes apparently unmanageable, but soon got way on her, and opened a heavy fire on us from her starboard broadside and maintop, no doubt with the intention of sinking us. We lay for the space of forty-five minutes within pistolshot of her ; our captain standing by the centre gun, fired one of his pistols and snapped the other, when he was wounded by a musket ball from the ship's maintop. The ball passed through his left shoulder. He walked aft to the doctor, and had his wound dressed. We luffed to windward, and forereached on her. In this action we had six men killed and sixteen wounded, and all the halyards of the headsails shot away, the foremast and bowsprit one-quarter cut through, and all the fore and main shrouds but one shot away ; both mainstays and running rigging cut to pieces ; a great number of shot through our sails, and several between wind and water, which caused our vessel to leak. There were also a number of shot in our hull. In this situation we began to make sail from her ; got the foresheet aft, and the jib and top-gallant-sail on her, and by the assistance of our sweeps, we soon got out of gunshot. During the time we were getting away from her, she kept up a welldirected fire for our foremast and foregaff, but without effect."

COMPLIMENT TO VALOR.

At a meeting of the stockholders of the private armed schooner Gen. Armstrong, Guy R. Champlin, Esq., commander, convened at Tammany Hall, pursuant to public notice, on Wednesday evening, 14th of April, 1813, the following resolutions were unanimously adopted :

Resolved, That the agents be requested to transmit the thanks of this meeting to Captain G. R. Champlin, his officers, and crew, for their gallant defence in an action sustained between the Gen. Armstrong and a British frigate, off Surinam.

"Resolved, That the agents present Captain G. R. Champlin with a sword, at the expense of the stockholders, for his gallant conduct in the rencontre above mentioned.

Resolved That the above resolutions be published.

" THOMAS FARMER, Chairman.

“ THOMAS JENKINS, Secretary."

REMARKS ON THE ACTION,

The writer was intimately acquainted with Captain Guy R. Champlin for many years. He was a native of New London, Connecticut. A more worthy and brave patriot, it would be difficult to find in any country. In the year 1806, we sailed from Leghorn to New Orleans, myself as chief mate, and Mr. Champlin as second mate of the ship Marshall, of New York.

Soon after this period we both became ship-masters in the merchant service, and continued our intimacy for more than ten years.

In a conversation with him about his action with the British frigate off Surinam, he said that when the Englishman's gaff-haul-yards were shot away, and his colors down, he thought, for a moment, she had struck. This circumstance occurred while the privateer lay withir half pistol-shot of the enemy's cabin windows, and had his colors been flying, he should have poured a double charge of round and grape from his long-tom into his cabin windows, which would have raked the frigate's decks fore and aft.

A person on board of the Gen. Armstrong told me, that after Captain Champlin was faint with the loss of blood from his wounded arm, he was persuaded to retire into the cabin, and while lying there on the floor, with a loaded pistol in his hand, directly above the magazine, he overheard something said on the quarter-deck about striking the colors. The heroic Champlin immediately requested the doctor to go on deck, and " tell the officers and men, that if any one of them dare to strike the colors, he would immediately fire into the magazine, and blow them all to hell together.”

Every person on board knew the character of their commander, they consequently had the choice of two evils ; therefore, with what sails they had left, and by the help of their sweeps, they made short tacks to windward, and soon got out of the reach of the enemy's shot.

None but a man of a resolute and daring character

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