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cient captain and a filthy crew ; but as there was no American vessel to sail for several weeks, and the treaty of peace with Great Britain was not ratified, I concluded to take passage in this neutral vessel.

Before sailing, the principal owner told the captain to attend to the comfort of Mr. Kennedy and myself, and to treat us with respect, and consult me always on the most judicious course to steer, etc., etc. He promised to comply with the request of the owner, and with much complacency said he had no doubt we should be very happy together. All these promises he most shamefully broke a few days after we got to sea. I remained in Lisbon just eighteen days, and, on the 13th of March, sailed in the good brig Tres Hermanos for New York.

After getting to sea, I was determined not to interfere with the course of the vessel, nor to proffer my advice, unless it was called for, and then with the greatest delicacy ; and never, in the slightest degree, made any remark to offend the mates or sailors during the long and tedious passage. The little, narrow-minded captain did not consult me at all on the course of the vessel, and absolutely appeared so jealous of me, that my position was almost insupportable ; and had not my friend Kennedy been on board, and the brig bound to New York, I should probably have been worse treated by these wretches. Although I scarcely exchanged a word with one of his men during the passage, I once overheard them say they should like to knock me in the head and throw me overboard. In lieu of steering a judicious course, and keeping a fair distance to the northward of the Western Islands, the poor devil steered down among the islands, where we were becalmed for several days, and made miserable progress getting to the westward. The brig was in such a filthy condition, that Mr. Kennedy and myself suffered out of measure with one of the plagues of Egypt. The probability is, that before leaving Lisbon the sailors were allowed to sleep in the berths in the cabin, and thus every part of the vessel was overrun with vermin.

By contrary winds and bad management, our passage was prolonged to 58 days, On the 9th of May we took a Sandy Hook pilot, and the same day arrived in New York. I was rejoiced to land once more in the United States, after an absence of sixteen months and twentyone days.

I cannot leave this brig without warning my friends and countrymen never to take passage across the Atlantic in a Portuguese vessel of any description.

On my return home, I found all my family and friends well. Peace was again restored to the United States.

Seven and a half months after this date, I received a letter from Mr. Henry Allen, the worthy young man, who was second lieutenant with me in the Leo, from which I make the following extracts :

SALEM, December 24th. Captain George Coggeshall :

DEAR SIR : If you have seen Mr. Depeyster, he has probably informed you of my unfortunate attempt to escape from Gibraltar.

After waiting about ten minutes, (time I thought sufficient for you to reach the mole), I left the wine shop in the same manner as yourself, and had already passed the two gates, and was on the mole, when I was arrested

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by the sergeant under whose charge we were, who demanded, in the most severe manner, where you were. Sensible that you must have been on the mole at the time, I told him that when you left me, you were going to Messrs. Turnbull & Co.'s. He immediately turned back, and with myself proceeded to the house. After gaining it, and passing away about forty-five minutes, he suspected I was deceiving him, consequently returned with me to the mole to make all inquiries, but in vain. He left your description with the officer of the mole. He then dragged me to the town major, who went immediately on horseback to every passage in the garrison with your description.

Fortune and my best wishes, however, favored your escape.

We were carried to England, and remained till the 29th of April, then released, and I came home as an agent for one of the cartels.

CHAPTER IX.

THE PRIVATEER YORK, OF BALTIMORE, RETURNS TO THAT PLACE AFTER A SUCCESSFUL

CRUISE ON THE COAST OF BRAZIL, AND AMONG THE ISLANDS IN THE WEST INDIES — THE PRIVATEER PORTSMOUTH CAPTURES THE SHIP JAMES, OF LONDON—THE JAMES ARRIVES AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.-REMARKS ON PRIVATEERS IN NOVEMBER, 1814 A GREAT MEETING OF MERCHANTS OF LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND, ON THE 9TH OF SEPTEMBFR, TO PETITION THEIR GOVERNMENT TO PROTECT THEM AGAINST AMERICAN PRIVATEERS—THE TRUE-BLOODED YANKEE, PRIVATEER, SAILS FROM BREST, ON THE 24TH OF NOVEMBER, 1814, ON A CRUISE IN THE BRITISH CHANNEL-ANECDOTE TO SHOW THE SPIRIT OF THE TIMES - ANECDOTE ABOUT AN AMERICAN AND A BRITISH OFFICER-CAPTURE OF THE BRITISH SHIP ANN DOROTHEA, SENT INTO BOSTON BY THE SARATOGA-CAPTURE OF THE BRIG HIRAM BY THE DAVID PORTER, OF BOSTON --ARRIVAL OF THE GRAND TURK AT SALEM, AFTER A SUCCESSFUL CRUISE-SEVERE CONFLICT BETWEEN THE SAUCY JACK AND TWO BRITISH LETTER-OF-MARQUE SHIPS, OFF ST. DOMINGO-HARD FIGHT, AND CAPTURE OF SEVERAL BRITISH MERCHANTMEN, BY THE KEMP, PRIVATEER OF BALTIMORE-CAPTURE OF THE EAST INDIA SHIP GENERAL WILLOUGHBY BY THE YANKEE, ORDERED FOR CHARLESTON-CRUISE OF THE PRIVATEER HARPY-HER CAPTURE OF THE BRITISH SHIP GARLAND-CAPTURE OF THE ENGLISH EAST INDIA SHIP STAR, BY THE SURPRISE.

The privateer York, of Baltimore, having returned safe home from a successful cruise on the coast of Brazil, and among the Islands in the West Indies, we find in connection with this fortunate vessel the following remarks, published in a weekly journal at that time :

“ The successful cruises of our privateers, speak in a voice of thunder, and tell Congress how the enemy should be assailed. The prizes of the York, privateer, are worth at least, a million and a half dollars. It is true that the two richest prizes recently captured by the York, may be recaptured by the enemy, still the privateer will reap a plentiful harvest from the spoils with which she is laden. “We hope and trust the Navy department will be directed to fit out fifty such vessels as the York, to cruise during the coming winter, with orders to burn, sink and destroy the enemy's property, which we hope may amount to some fifteen or twenty millions of dollars. Perhaps this is the best way to fight England at sea, after all. We have already reaped a full harvest of naval glory, and we should now attack the foe in the way that we can do him the most essential injury.”

The York did not lose a single man during her cruise of thirteen weeks

PRIZES CAPTURED BY PRIVATEERS.

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soners.

The following prizes were taken by the Surprise, and burnt: brig Queen Charlotte, ship Milnes, brig Lively, schooner Prince Regent, brig Willing Maid, brig Polly, schooner Sally. The English privateer Lively, 1 gun, 17 men, brought into Salem. Ship Caledonia, from Cork for Quebec, with dry-goods rum, etc., worth $250,000, divested her of goods to the value of $50,000. Brigs Eagle, Traveller, Wellington (4 guns and 15 men), and Eliza, were made cartels of, to release the pri

The Surprise also captured the brig Albion, schooner Charlotte Ann, and recaptured the boat Ann.

The privateer Surprise, belonged to Baltimore, and was a very fortunate vessel. During her last cruise, which only occupied one month, she captured twenty sail of British merchantmen, including one small privateer. She made 197 prisoners, released 160, and brought into port 37. She divested the ship Caledonia, and other prizes, of British goods to the amount of $60,000, and arrived safe at Salem, laden with rich spoils taken from

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