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wish, that his name may be honored and cherished by every American heart, and I think he is richly entitled to a national monument, to perpetuate his memory to the latest generations.

The writer regrets that he never had the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with Captain Boyle ; but from all he can learn of his character, to say that he was a dashing, brave man, would, in his case, be but common-place eulogy, for he was infinitely more than that idea expresses. He evidently possessed many of the elements of a great man, for in him were blended the impetuous bravery of a Murat, with the prudence of a Wellington. He wisely judged when to attack the enemy, and when to retreat, with honor to himself, and to the flag under which he sailed.

The reader will please observe his daring bravery in cruising in the British Channel ; and call to mind his many gallant victories, particularly when in command of the schooner Comet, in an action off Pernambuco, with a large Portuguese man-of-war-brig and three English merchantmen.

They were all well-armed and manned, notwithstanding which, Captain Boyle captured the three British vessels, and beat off the man-of-war.

The details of this battle may be found in the fourth chapter of this work.

In his last cruise in the Chasseur he also captured his Britannic Majesty's schooner St. Lawrence, of at least equal force with himself.

And then, reflect on his prudence in the management of his prizes.

He destroyed the dullest and poorest of them, and sent into port the best and most valuable, after having removed the specie, and all the most valuable articles into his own vessel, so as to secure a successful cruise to his owners, and to all others concerned in the enterprise.

As far as I can judge, he displayed in all his acts a sound judgment, beautifully blended with patriotic bravery.

Had this gentleman been a Commander in the United States Navy, his fame and deeds of valor would have been lauded throughout our great republic ; but as he only commanded a privateer, who speaks of him? Or of such men as Diron, Champlin, Murphy, Stafford, Wooster, and a host of others, who fought and bled in their country's cause.

Is it not then narrow-minded prejudice not to award a just appreciation of the services of the gallant men who commanded privateers and letters-of-marque during our severe struggle with England for an equal right to navigate the ocean, the great highway of nations. For it must certainly be conceded, that while contending with the enemy at that period, the privateers and private armed vessels formed in fact a large portion of our navy, and were an indispensable auxiliary to it, as the militia and volunteers were to the United

States army.

24

CHAPTER XI.

CAPTAIN REID'S CRUISE--ARRIVAL AT FAYAL-ACCOUNT OF HIS GALLANT DEFENCE

COPY OF A LETTER FROM THE AMERICAN CONSUL AT FAYAL TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE AT WASHINGTON-CAPTAIN REID'S ARRIVAL AT SAVANNAH-HIS RECEPTION AT THAT PLACE-PUBLIC DINNER GIVEN HIM AT RICHMOND, VA.-TOASTS, ETC. -CONTINUATION OF PRIZES AFTER THE CONCLUSION OF PEACE--ESCAPE OF THE PRIVATEER-BRIG WARRIOR FROM Å BRITISH FRIGATE AND A SEVENTY-FOUR-SHE ARRIVES AT NEW YORK-BRIG TAGCS, FROM SMYRNA, CAPTURED BY THE LETTER-OFMARQUE BRUTUS, OF BOSTON-BRITISH PACKET WINDSOR CASTLE, FROM FALMOUTH, ENGLAND, FOR HALIFAX, CAPTURED BY THE ROGER AND SENT INTO NORFOLK-TRANSPORTSHIP MOSELY, CAPTURED BY THE LETTER-OF-MARQUE RAMBLER, AND SENT TO BOSTON -BRITISH BRIG BOURWAN, FROM PENANG, WITH A VALUABLE CARGO, CAPTURED BY THE JACOB JONES, AND SENT TO BOSTON-EXTRACT FROM THE JOURNAL OF THE PRIVATEER MC DONOUGH, AT MORLAIX, FRANCE-PRIVATEERS PREPARING FOR SEA, WHEN THE NEWS OF PEACE ARRIVES IN THE UNITED STATES

CRUISE AND CAPTURE OF THE PRIVATEER-BRIG GENERAL ARM

STRONG, SAMUEL C. REID, COMMANDER.

Captain Reid sailed from Sandy Hook on the 9th of September, 1814, bound on a cruise. On the same night after leaving port, Captain Reid was chased by a British frigate, and a ship of the line. He outsailed them both, when at noon the next day, they thought proper to give up the chase. On the 11th, two days after leaving port, he boarded the private armedschooner Perry, six days from Philadelphia. The Perry had thrown all her guns overboard, being hard pressed by the enemy. The next day, on the 12th, Captain Reid exchanged a few shots with a British man-of-war brig, and then proceeded on his course. On the 24th, boarded a Spanish brig and a schooner, and also a Portuguese ship, all from Havana. He allowed them all to proceed on their respective courses.

On the 26th of (370)

September, Captain Reid came to anchor in the Fayal Roads, for the purpose of filling up water, and obtaining refreshments. From this date I shall leave the brave captain to tell his own story ; here follows the relation of that gentleman

"I called on the American Consul, who very politely ordered our water immediately sent off, it being our intention to proceed to sea early the next day. At 5 P. M. I went on board, the Consul and some other gentlemen in company

I asked some questions concerning the enemy's cruisers, and was told there had been none at these Islands for several weeks, when about dusk, while we were conversing, the British brig Carnation, suddenly hove in sight, close under the N.E. head of the harbor, within gun-shot. When first discovered, the idea of getting under way was instantly suggested, but finding the enemy's brig had the advantage of a breeze, and but little wind with us, it was thought doubtful if we should be able to get to sea without hazarding an action. I questioned the Consul to know, if in his opinion the enemy would regard the neutrality of the port? He gave me to understand I might make myself perfectly easy, assuring me at the same time, they would never molest us while at anchor. But no sooner did the enemy's brig understand from the pilot-boat who we were, than she immediately hauled close in, and let go her anchor within pistol-shot of us. At the same moment the Plantagenet and frigate Rota, hove in sight, to whom the Carnation instantly made signals, and a constant interchange, took place for some time.

“The result was, the Carnation proceeded to throw out all her boats; dispatched on board the Commodore, and appeared otherwise to be making unusual exertions. From these circumstances, we began to suspect their real

intentions. The moon was near its full, which enabled us to observe them very minutely, and I now determined to haul in nearer the shore.

Accordingly, after clearing for action, we got under way, and began to sweep in. The moment this was observed by the enemy's brig, she instantly cut her cable, made sail, and dispatched four boats in pursuit of us. Being now about 8 P. M., as soon as we saw the boats approaching, we let go our anchor, got springs on our cable, and prepared to receive them. I hailed them repeatedly as they drew near, but they felt no inclination to reply. Sure of their game, they only pulled up with the greater speed. I observed the boats were well manned, and apparently as well armed; and as soon as they had cleverly got alongside, we opened our fire, which was as soon returned ; but meeting with rather a warmer reception than they had probably been aware of, they very soon cried out for quarters, and hauled off. In this skirmish I had one man killed, and my first lieutenant wounded. The enemy's loss must have been upward of twenty killed and wounded.

· They had now repaired to their ships to prepare for a more formidable attack. We, in the interim, having taken the hint, prepared to haul close into the beach, where we moored head and stern, within half pistol-shot of the castle. This done, we again prepared, in the best possible manner, for their second reception.

"About 9 P.M. we observed the enemy's brig towing in a large fleet of boats. They soon after left the brig, and took their station in three divisions, under cover of a small reef of rocks, within about musket shot of us. Here they continued manoeuvring for some time, the brig still keeping under way to act with the boats, should we at any time attempt our escape.

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