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PUBLICK DOCUMENTS

THE UNITED STATES

FROM THE

ACCESSION OF THOMAS JEFFERSON TO THE PRESIDENCY, EXHI•

BITING A COMPLETE VIEW OF OUR FOREIGN

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Published also by Whiting and Tiffany, New Haven; Henry Whipple, Salem; and Moses

Thomas, Philadelphia.

David Hale, agent for the States of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Rbode Island.

1815.

H8857 53q2.6

US Doc 443.11 (5)

DISTRICT CLERK'S OFFICE.

DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT:

BE it remembered, That on the twelfth day of November, A. D. 1814, and in the thirtyninth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Thomas B. Wait and Sons of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors in the words following, to wit:

“State Papers and Publick Documents of the United States, from the accession of Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency, exhibiting a complete view of our Foreign Relations since that time.”

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled " An act for the
encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the
authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned ;" and also to
an act entitled "An act supplementary to an act, entitled, an act for the encouragement
of learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and propri-
etors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and extending the benefits thereof
to the Arts of Designing, Engraving, and Etching Historical, and other Prints.

WILLIAM S. SHAW,
Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

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ADVERTISEMENT.

1

The publishers of the State Papers and Publick Documents of the United States from the accession of Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency, congratulate themselves and the citizens of this coun. try on the completion of this important undertaking.

No cause of complaint against the publishers would have been suggested by any person, had the present volume closed with the documents before the publick at the date of our proposals. Although the full complement of five hundred pages was occupied with those to that time, January 1814, they have thought best to incur the expense of about half another volume to enable the community to receive the complete set of Papers to the close of the war. The inducement to this gratuitous exertion for the general diffusion of information was the very liberal subscription, with which this work has been received ; and the publishers entertain no fears of ultimate loss from the neglect of a generous people.

Though the volumes embrace so many documents of such di. versified relations with foreign powers, it is confidently believed the collection is complete. No labour has been spared to make

The opinions of gentlemen, whom the publishers have consulted on this subject, have not, however, in all cases, been united. A desire has been expressed to have the convention of boundaries, as settled by Mr. King, between us and Great Bri. tain, inserted.

Perhaps many would look for the celebrated let. ter of Turreau, the French minister, relative to which the state. ment of Mr. Graham is given by the secretary of state with his report. The letter is printed with the Journals of the House. But we have not thought ourselves permitted to publish papers of that kind, unless by the President communicated to Congress, and afterwards by the Congress given to their constituents. The late war produced many official letters and reports, such as those on retaliation, on the manner in which the war was conducted by the enemy, and treatment of prisoners, of which our judgment was, that they were not within the original plan of the undertaking. Yet the evidence of the sale by the enemy of slaves, carried from Virginia, is given, though it might seem equally to be excluded, because in the instructions of the secretary to our plenipotentiaries at Ghent, it is introduced among the other important subjects of advice, and the omission of the document to support the instructions might not have been justifiable. If, however, any paper be discovered by curious inquirers, whose

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