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have proved less favourable to the objects had in view, was recalled; and another substituted, whose qualities were the most opposite and most unequal to his opponent's, and whom, of all mankind perhaps, could he have chosen, he himself would have first selected. It is interesting to learn with how little disguise or moderation the crafty American proceeded to practise on the simplicity of his English admirer. The Loyalists, who had been plundered, persecuted, exiled, ruined, were easily given up, because they had misled the Government, or the Government had misled them. Their claim for compensation was met with demands of satisfaction for the damages done by them, and by the King's troops. Rights of fishery, which the most friendly nation in Europe had never the assurance to ask, were conceded, as a boon indeed, but a most politic one, to efface the memory of the past, and ensure a sincere reconciliation for the future. Whatever could not be demanded for the right of his own nation, was claimed for the benefit of ours. It was urged, (a remarkable coincidence with the opinions of certain œconomists of the present day,) that the real interests of Great Britain would be best promoted, by the surrender to the new Republic, of Canada and Nova Scotia; and it was even suggested,

as a corollary to the same argument, that to secure her permanent prosperity, on that side of the Atlantic, it was only necessary to throw in the West Indies. The figure Mr. Oswald presents, at such a game, surrounded by the four American commissioners, Franklin, Adams, Jay, and Laurens, recalls the story lately circulating in the morning papers, of Lord Nottingham among the Sharpers, one of whom reproached his companions with wasting their time in gambling with such a flat, pick the fool's pocket at once and send him home.' How easy had it then been for Great Britain, to have prescribed such limits as she thought fit. The Kennebec on the east; the Ohio on the west; and such a Line of boundary on the north, as should have secured to us the vast tract of vacant land between their settlements and the Lakes. They had no reason to claim, nor ability to enforce, a pretence to any thing more. Their ally, the King of France, it is now known, was well disposed, both to confine them to narrower limits, and to exclude them from the fisheries. But Mr. Oswald's mercantile ideas were alarmed with the threat, that though peace indeed might be procured on such terms, a good understanding, and above all, a renewal of commercial intercourse, could never be obtained, without more

liberal concessions: as if either nations or individuals could long be induced to trade from any other motives, than reciprocal advantage, or any advantages were elsewhere to be found superior to the British market. Accordingly a Boundary was settled and described, by which a vast extent of territory, exceeding that of the whole revolted Colonies together, already valuable for its trade in furs, and which has since become populous and powerful, was given, as a premium to rebellion, to establish the new Republic, and furnish, as it has ever since, an important part of their financial resources, and the means of almost infinite increase. A faint attempt was indeed made, to reserve some part of the western territories, as an asylum for the exiled Loyalists; but Dr. Franklin did not like such neighbours, as he haughtily says; and Mr. Oswald thought it better to offer all, as an atonement to our enemies, than retain any, as provision for our friends. It may be that the wounded pride of the Country, or Government, found some consolation in sending a man of this description to treat with the Americans, as though the disgrace of negotiating with Rebels could be alleviated or concealed by the obscurity of the negotiator; (or was it that an Administration, every member of which had protested in parlia

ment that the war was unjust, found themselves bound to act in office, consistently with their opinions in opposition?) but such unworthy indulgence either to the contempt, or indifference, or the party-spirit, of that period, has cost much to the best interests of every other. The boundary is thus described in the second article of the treaty:

"From the North-west Angle of Nova Scotia, "viz. that Angle, which is formed by a line "drawn due north from the Source of St. Croix "River to the Highlands, along the said High"lands, which divide those Rivers that empty "themselves into the River St. Lawrence, from "those which fall into the Atlantic Ocean, to "the north-western-most head of the Connecti"cut River; thence down along the middle of “that River, to the forty-fifth degree of north "latitude; from thence by a line due west in "said latitude until it strikes the River Iroquois "or Cataraguy; thence along the middle of said "River into Lake Ontario; through the middle "of said Lake until it strikes the communication

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by water, between that Lake and Lake Erie ; "thence along the middle of said communica“tion into Lake Erie; through the middle of "said Lake, until it arrives at the water com"munication between that Lake and Lake

"Huron; thence along the middle of said water "communication into Lake Huron; thence

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through the middle of said Lake to the water "communication between that Lake and Lake Superior; thence through Lake Superior "northward to the Isles Royal and Philipeaux, "to the Long Lake; thence through the middle "of said Long Lake and the water communica"tion between it and the Lake of the Woods "to the said Lake of the Woods; thence through "the said Lake to the most north-western point "thereof; and from thence on a due west course, "to the River Mississippi; thence by a line to "be drawn along the middle of the said River Mississippi until it shall intersect the northern"most part of the thirty-first degree of north "latitude;-South, by a line to be drawn due "east from the determination of the line last " mentioned in the latitude of thirty-one degrees "north of the Equator to the middle of the River Apalachicola or Catahouche; thence along "the middle thereof to its junction with Flint "River; thence straight to the head of St. Mary's "River; and thence down along the middle of "of St. Mary's River to the Atlantic Ocean; "East, by a line to be drawn along the middle "of the river St. Croix, from its mouth in the

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