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master and crew, together with the papers found on board, and other necessary proofs and witnesses, and one of the certificates mentioned in the preceding paragraph of this article, shall be sent and delivered at the earliest possible moment to the proper court before which the vessel would otherwise have been sent. Upon the production of the said certificate, the court may proceed to adjudicate upon the detention of the vessel in the same manner as if the vessel had been sent in.

The negroes or others intended to be consigned to slavery shall be handed over to the nearest British authority.

The undersigned Plenipotentiaries have agreed, in conformity with the IVth Article of the additional convention, signed by them on this day, that the present instructions shall be annexed to the said convention, and be considered an integral part thereof.

Done at Washington the third day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy.

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SUPPLEMENTAL CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN, CONCERNING THE RENUNCIATION OF NATURALIZATION IN CERTAIN CASES. SIGNED FEBRUARY 23, 1871; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED MAY 4, 1871; PROCLAIMED MAY 5, 1871.

Whereas by the second article of the convention between the United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, for regulating the citizenship of citizens and subjects of the contracting parties who have emigrated or may emigrate, from the dominions of the one to those of the other party, signed at London, on the 13th of May, 1870, it was stipulated that the manner in which the renunciation by such citizens and subjects of their naturalization, and the resumption of their native allegiance may be made and publicly declared, should be agreed upon by the Governments of the respective countries, the President of the United States of America and Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, for the purpose of effecting such agreement, have resolved to conclude a supplemental convention, and have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say, the President of the United States of America, Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State, and Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Sir Edward Thornton, Knight Commander of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, and her Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States of America; who have agreed as follows:

ARTICLE I.

country naturalized

Any person, being originally a citizen of the United States, who had previously to May 13th, 1870, been naturalized as a British Certain citizens subject, may, at any time before August 10th, 1872, and any or subjets of either British subject who, at the date first aforesaid, had been in the other may renaturalized as a citizen within the United States, may, at any ization, and in what time before May 12th, 1872, publicly declare his renunciation of such naturalization by subscribing an instrument in writing, substantially in the form hereunto appended, and designated as Annex A.

nouace their natural

manner.

If within the United States.

If beyond the ter

Such renunciation, by an original citizen of the United States, of British nationality, shall, within the territories and jurisdiction of the United States, be made in duplicate, in the presence of any court authorized by law for the time being to admit aliens to naturalization, or before the clerk or prothonotary of any such ritory of the United court: if the declarant be beyond the territories of the United States, it shall be made in duplicate, before any diplomatic or consular officer of the United States. One of such duplicates shall remain of record in the custody of the court or officer in whose presence it was made; the other shall be, without delay, transmitted to the Department of State.

States.

Renunciation, how to be made.

Kingdom.

British dominions.

Such renunciation, if declared by an original British subject, of his If in the United acquired nationality as a citizen of the United States, shall, if the declarant be in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, be made in duplicate, in the presence of a justice of the If elsewhere in the peace; if elsewhere in Her Britannic Majesty's dominions, in triplicate, in the presence of any judge of civil or criminal jurisdiction, of any justice of the peace, or of any other officer for the time being authorized by law, in the place in which the declarant is, to administer an oath for any judicial or other legal purpose: if out of Her Majesty's dominions, in triplicate, in the presence of any officer in the diplomatic or consular service of Her Majesty.

Lists, &c., of persous renouncing their naturalization to be furnished.

ARTICLE II.

The contracting parties hereby engage to communicate each to the other, from time to time, lists of the persons who, within their respective dominions and territories, or before their diplomatic and consular officers, have declared their renunciation of naturalization, with the dates and places of making such declarations, and such information as to the abode of the declarants, and the times and places of their naturalization, as they may have furnished.

Convention, when to be ratified.

ARTICLE III.

The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by Her Britannic Majesty, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as may be convenient. In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto their respective seals.

Done at Washington the twenty-third day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one.

of

[SEAL.] [SEAL.]

Form of declaration

ANNEX A.

HAMILTON FISH.
EDWD. THORNTON.

I, A. B., of [insert abode], being originally a citizen of the United States of America, [or a British subject,] and having berenunciation of come naturalized within the dominions of Her Britannic naturalization. Majesty as a British subject, [or as a citizen within the United States of America,] do hereby renounce my naturalization as a British subject, [or citizen of the United States,] and declare that it is my desire to resume my nationality as a citizen of the United States, [or British subject.]

(Signed)

A. B.

Made and subscribed to before me,

in [insert country or other

subdivision, and State, province, colony, legation, or consulate,] this

day of

1874.

(Signed)

[SEAL.] [SEAL.]

E. F.,

Justice of the Peace, [or other title.]
HAMILTON FISH.
EDWD. THORNTON.

GREAT BRITAIN, 1871.

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN RELATIVE TO CLAIMS, FISHERIES, NAVIGATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE, &c.; AMERICAN LUMBER ON THE RIVER ST. JOHN; BOUNDARY. CONCLUDED MAY 8, 1871; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED JUNE 17, 1871; PROCLAIMED JULY 4, 1871.

Contracting parties.

The United States of America and Her Britannic Majesty, being desirous to provide for an amicable settlement of all causes of difference between the two countries, have for that purpose appointed their respective Plenipotentiaries, that is to say: The President of the United States has appointed, on the part of the United States, as Commissioners in a Joint High Commission and Plenipotentiaries, Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State; Robert Cumming Schenck, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain; Samuel Nelson, an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States; Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, of Massachusetts; and George Henry Williams, of Oregon; and Her Britannic Majesty, on her part, has ap pointed as her High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries, the Right Honourable George Frederick Samuel, Earl de Grey and Earl of Ripon, Viscount Goderich, Baron Grantham, a Baronet, a Peer of the United Kingdom, Lord President of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, etc., etc.; the Right Honourable Sir Stafford Henry Northcote, Baronet, one of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, a Member of Parliament, a Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, etc., etc.; Sir Edward Thornton, Knight Commander of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Her Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States of America; Sir John Alexander Macdonald, Knight Commander of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, a Member of Her Majesty's Privy Council for Canada, and Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Her Majesty's Dominion of Canada; and Mountague Bernard, Esquire, Chichele Professor of International Law in the University of Oxford.

And the said Plenipotentiaries, after having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in due and proper form, have agreed to and concluded the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

Alabama claims

Whereas differences have arisen between the Government of the United States and the Government of Her Britannic Majesty, and still exist, growing out of the acts committed by the to be referred to arseveral vessels which have given rise to the claims generically known as the "Alabama Claims :"

bitration.

And whereas Her Britannic Majesty has authorized her High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries to express, in a friendly spirit, the regret felt by Her Majesty's Government for the escape, under whatever circumstances, of the Alabama and other vessels from British ports, and for the depredations committed by those vessels:

Arbitrators, and how to be named.

Now, in order to remove and adjust all complaints and claims on the part of the United States, and to provide for the speedy settlement of such claims which are not admitted by Her Britannic Majesty's Government, the high contracting parties agree that all the said claims, growing out of acts committed by the aforesaid vessels, and generically known as the "Alabama Claims," shall be referred to a tribunal of arbitration to be composed of five Arbitrators, to be appointed in the following manner, that is to say: One shall be named by the President of the United States; one shall be named by Her Britannic Majesty; His Majesty the King of Italy shall be requested to name one; the President of the Swiss Confederation shall be requested to name one; and His Majesty the Emperor of Brazil shall be requested to

name one.

In case of the death, absence, or incapacity to serve of any or either of the said Arbitrators, or, in the event of either of the said Vacancies, how filled. Arbitrators omitting or declining or ceasing to act as such, the President of the United States, or Her Britannic Majesty, or His Majesty the King of Italy, or the President of the Swiss Confederation, or His Majesty the Emperor of Brazil, as the case may be, may forthwith name another person to act as Arbitrator in the place and stead of the Arbitrator originally named by such head of a State.

And in the event of the refusal or omission for two months after receipt of the request from either of the high contracting parties of His Majesty the King of Italy, or the President of the Swiss Confederation, or His Majesty the Emperor of Brazil, to name an Arbitrator either to fill the original appointment or in the place of one who may have died, be absent, or incapacitated, or who may omit, decline, or from any cause cease to act as such Arbitrator, His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway shall be requested to name one or more persons, as the case may be, to act as such Arbitrator or Arbitrators.

Arbitrators to

ARTICLE II.

The Arbitrators shall meet at Geneva, in Switzerland, at the earliest convenient day after they shall have been named, and shall meet, when and proceed impartially and carefully to examine and decide all questions that shall be laid before them on the part of the Governments of the United States and Her Britannic MajA majority to de- esty respectively. All questions considered by the tribunal, including the final award, shall be decided by a majority of

Their powers.

cide.

all the Arbitrators.

Each of the high contracting parties shall also name one person to attend the tribunal as its Agent to represent it generally in Agent of each party. all matters connected with the arbitration.

Case of each party,

ARTICLE III.

The written or printed case of each of the two parties, accompanied by the documents, the official correspondence, and other evi&c., when to be given dence on which each relies, shall be delivered in duplicate to Arbitrators. to each of the Arbitrators and to the Agent of the other

party as soon as may be after the organization of the tribunal, but within a period not exceeding six months from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this treaty.

ARTICLE IV.

Within four months after the delivery on both sides of the written or printed case, either party may, in like manner, deliver in Counter case, &c. duplicate to each of the said Arbitrators, and to the Agent

of the other party, a counter case and additional documents, correspondence, and evidence, in reply to the case, documents, correspondence, and evidence so presented by the other party.

Time may be extended.

The Arbitrators may, however, extend the time for delivering such counter case, documents, correspondence, and evidence, when, in their judgment, it becomes necessary, in consequence of the distance of the place from which the evidence to be presented is to be procured.

If in the case submitted to the Arbitrators either party shall have specified or alluded to any report or document in its own exclu- Documents and pasive possession without annexing a copy, such party shall pers to be produced. be bound, if the other party thinks proper to apply for it, to furnish that party with a copy thereof; and either party may call upon the other, through the Arbitrators, to produce the originals or certified copies of any papers adduced as evidence, giving in each instance such reasonable notice as the Arbitrators may require.

ARTICLE V.

Arguments and

It shall be the duty of the Agent of each party, within two months after the expiration of the time limited for the delivery of the counter case on both sides, to deliver in duplicate to each briefs. of the said Arbitrators and to the Agent of the other party a written or printed argument showing the points and referring to the evidence upon which his Government relies; and the Arbitrators may, if they desire further elucidation with regard to any point, require a written or printed statement or argument, or oral argument by counsel, upon it; but in such case the other party shall be entitled to reply either orally or in writing, as the case may be.

ARTICLE VI.

Rules, &c, to gov. ern the Arbitrators in their decisions.

In deciding the matters submitted to the Arbitrators, they shall be governed by the following three rules, which are agreed upon by the high contracting parties as rules to be taken as applicable to the case, and by such principles of international law not inconsistent therewith as the Arbitrators shall determine to have been applicable to the case.

RULES.

A neutral Government is bound

use due diligence to

First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has rea- Obligations of neu sonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on tral Government to war against a Power with which it is at peace; and also to prevent the fitting use like diligence to prevent the departure from its juris- &c., of vessels, &c. diction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such

out, &c., within,

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