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gun only, and no powder will be given, as mentioned in the ancient eleventh article of this treaty, which is hereby annulled.

ARTICLE the 12th-As it now is.

When citizens of the United States shall come within the dependencies of Tunis to carry on commerce there, the same respect shall be paid to them which the merchants of other nations enjoy; and if they wish to establish themselves within our ports, no opposition shall be made thereto, and they shall be free to avail themselves of such interpreters as they may judge necessary, without any obstruction, in conformity with the usages of other nations; and if a Tunisian subject shall go to establish himself within the dependencies of the United States, he shall be treated in like manner. If any Tunisian subject shall freight an American vessel, and load her with merchandise, and shall afterwards want to unload, or ship them on board of another vessel, we shall not permit him until the matter is determined by a reference of merchants, who shall decide upon the case; and after the decision the determination shall be conformed to.

No captain shall be detained in port against his consent, except when our ports are shut for the vessels of all other nations, which may take place with respect to merchant vessels, but not to those of

war.

The subjects and citizens of the

and if the said Consul does not want a salute, there shall be no question about it.

But, in case he shall desire the salute, and the number of guns shall be fired which he may have requested, they shall be counted, and returned by the vessel in as many barrels of cannon-powder.

The same shall be done with respect to the Tunisian corsairs, when they shall enter any port of the United States.

ARTICLE 12th-As it was.

Commerce.

When citizens of the United States shall come within the dependencies of Tunis to carry on commerce there, the same respect shall be paid to them which the merchants of other nations enjoy; and if they wish to establish themselves within our ports, no opposition shall be made thereto; and they shall be free to avail themselves of such interpreters as they may judge necessary, without any obstruction, in conformity with the usages of other nations; and if a Tunisian subject shall go to establish himself within the dependencies of the United States, he shall be treated in like

manner.

Freight.

If any Tunisian subject shall freight an American vessel, and load her with merchandise, and shall afterwards want to unlade or ship them on board of another vessel, we will not permit him, until the matter is determined by a reference of merchants, who shall decide upon the case; and after the decision the determination shall be conformed to.

No captain shall be detained in port against his con- No captain to be sent, except when our detained against his ports are shut for the vessels of all other nations; which may take place with respect to mer

consent except, &c.

Protection of citi

ive nations,

war.

two nations, respect- chant vessels, but not to those of zens of the respect- ively, Tunisians and Americans, shall be protected in the places where they may be by the officers of the Government there existing; but, on failure of such protection, and for redress of every injury, the party may resort to the chief authority in each country, by whom adequate protection and complete justice shall be rendered. In case the

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Trade.

All vessels belonging to the citizens and inhabitants of the United States shall be permitted to enter the ports of the Kingdom of Tunis, and freely trade with the subjects and inhabitants thereof, on paying the usual duties which are paid by other most favoured nations at peace with the Regency. In like manner, all vessels belonging to the subjects and inhabitants of the Kingdom of Tunis shall be permitted to enter the different ports of the United States, and freely trade with the citizens and inhabitants thereof, on paying the usual duties which are paid by other most favoured nations at peace with the United States.

The subjects of the two contracting Powers shall be under the protection of the Prince, and under the jurisdiction of the chief of the place where they may be, and no other person shall have authority over them. If the Commandant of the place does not conduct himself agreeably to justice, a representation of it shall be made to us.

In case the Government shall have need of an American merchant vessel, it shall cause it to be freighted, and then a suitable freight shall be paid to the captain, agreeably to the intention of the Government, and the captain shall not refuse it.

ARTICLE 14th-As it was.

A Tunisian merchant, who may go to America with a vessel of any nation soever, loaded with merchandize, which is the production of the Kingdom of Tunis, shall pay duty (small as it is) like the merchants of other nations; and the American merchants shall equally pay for the merchandize of their country, which they may bring to Tunis, under their flag, the same duty as the Tunisians pay in America. But if an American merchant, or a merchant of any other nation, shall bring American merchandize under any other flag, he shall pay six per cent. duty; in like manner, if a foreign merchant shall bring the merchandize of his country under the American flag, he shall also pay six per cent.

Concluded, signed, and sealed, at the Palace of Bardo, near Tunis, the 24th day of the moon jumed-teni, in the year of the Hegira 1239, corresponding [to] the 24th of February, 1824, of the Christian year, and the 48th year of the Independence of the United States, reserving the same, nevertheless, for the final ratification of the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. S. D. HEAP, Chargé d'Affaires. [L. S.] SIDI MAHMOUD'S signature and [L. S.]

TWO SICILIES.

TWO SICILIES, 1832.

CONVENTION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF THE KINGDOM OF THE TWO SICILIES, TO TERMINATE THE RECLAMATIONS OF SAID GOVERNMENT FOR THE DEPREDATIONS INFLICTED UPON AMERICAN COMMERCE BY MURAT DURING THE YEARS 1809, 1810, 1811, AND 1812. CONCLUDED OCTOBER 14, 1832; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED JUNE 8,1833; PROCLAIMED AUGUST 27, 1833.

The Government of the United States of America and His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, desiring to terminate the reclamations advanced by said Government against his said Majesty, in order that the merchants of the United States may be indemnified for the losses inflicted upon them by Murat, by the depredations, seizures, confiscations, and destruction of their vessels and cargoes, during the years 1809, 1810, 1811, and 1812, and His Sicilian Majesty desiring thereby to strengthen with the said Government the bonds of that harmony, not hitherto disturbed: The said Government of the United States and his aforesaid Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, have with one accord resolved to come to an adjustment; to effectuate which, they have respectively named and furnished with the necessary powers, viz:

The said Government of the United States, John Nelson, Esquire, a citizen of said States, and their Chargé d'Affaires near His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies; and His Majesty, His Excellency D. Antonio Maria Statella, Prince of Cassaro, Marquis of Spaccaforno, Count Statella, etc., etc., etc., his said Majesty's Minister Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, etc., etc.;

Who, after the exchange of their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

made for spoliations on American prop

His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, with a view to satisfy the aforesaid reclamations, for the depredations, sequestrations, confiscations, and destruction of the vessels Payment to be and cargoes of the merchants of the United States, (and for every expense of every kind whatsoever incident to or erty. growing out of the same,) inflicted by Murat during the years 1809, 1810, 1811, and 1812, obliges himself to pay the sum of two millions one hundred and fifteen thousand Neapolitan ducats to the Government of the United States; seven thousand six hundred and seventy-nine ducats, part thereof to be applied to reimburse the said Government for the expense incurred by it in the transportation of American seamen from the Kingdom of Naples, during the year 1810, and the residue to be distributed amongst the claimants by the said Government of the United States, in such manner and according to such rules as it may prescribe.

ARTICLE II.

To be paid in nine

The sum of two millions one hundred and fifteen thousand Neapolitan ducats agreed on in article the 1st, shall be paid in Naples, equal installments. in nine equal installments of two hundred and thirty-five thousand ducats, and with interest thereon at the rate of four per centum per annum, to be calculated from the date of the interchange of the ratifications of this convention, until the whole sum shall be paid. The first installment shall be payable twelve months after the exchange of the said ratifications, and the remaining installments, with the interest, successively, one year after another. The said payments shall be made in Naples into the hands of such person as shall be duly authorized by the Government of the United States to receive the same.

ARTICLE III.

The present convention shall be ratified and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged in this capital, in the space of eight months from this date, or sooner if possible.

Ratifications.

In faith whereof the parties above named have respectively subscribed these articles, and thereto affixed their seals.

Done at Naples on the 14th day of October, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two.

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TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION WITH THE TWO SICILIES. CONCLUDED DECEMBER 1, 1845; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED AT NAPLES, JUNE 1, 1846; PROCLAIMED JULY 24, 1846.

The United States of America and His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, equally animated with the desire of maintaining the relations of good understanding which have hitherto so happily subsisted between their respective States, and consolidating the commercial intercourse between them, have agreed to enter in negotiation for the conclusion of a treaty of commerce and navigation, for which purpose they have appointed Plenipotentiaries, that is to say: The President of the United States of America, William H. Polk, Chargé d'Affaires of the same United States of America to Negotiators. the Court of His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies; and His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, D. Giustino Fortunato, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Military Constantinian Order of St. George, and of Francis the 1st, Minister Secretary of State of His said Majesty; D. Michael Gravina and Requesenz, Prince of Comitini, Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Order of Francis the 1st, Gentleman of the Chamber in Waiting, and Minister Secretary of State of his said Majesty; and D. Antonio Spinelli, of Scalea, Commander of the Rl. Order of Francis the 1st, Gentleman of the Chamber of His said Majesty, Member of the General Consulta, and Surintendant-General of the Archives of the Kingdom;

Who, after having each others exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have concluded and signed the following articles:

ARTICLE I.

There shall be reciprocal liberty of commerce and navigation between the United States of America and the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies.

and

Reciprocal liberty of commerce navigation.

Duties to be imimporta

tions.

Favors granted,

No duty of customs, or other impost, shall be charged upon any goods the produce or manufacture of one country, upon importation by sea or by land from such country into the posed on other, other or higher than the duty or impost charged upon goods of the same kind, the produce or manufacture of, or imported from, any other country; and the United States of America and His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies do hereby engage that the subjects or citizens of any other State shall not enjoy any favour, privilege, or immunity whatever, in matters of commerce and navigation, which shall not also and at the same time be extended to the subjects or citizens of the other high contracting party, gratuitously, if the concession in favour of that other State shall have been gratuitous, and in return for a compensation, as nearly as possible of proportionate value and effect, to be adjusted by mutual agreement, if the concession shall have been conditional.

ARTICLE II.

Equalization of du

and exports

All articles of the produce or manufacture of either country, and of their respective States, which can legally be imported into either country from the other, in ships of that other country, tes, &c., on imports and thence coming, shall, when so imported, be subject to the same duties and enjoy the same privileges, whether imported in ships of the one country or in ships of the other; and, in like manner, all goods which can legally be exported or re-exported from either country to the other, in ships of that other country, shall, when so exported or re-exported, be subject to the same duties, and be entitled to the same privileges, drawbacks, bounties, and allowances, whether exported in ships of the one country or in ships of the other."

ARTICLE III.

light-house duties.

No duties of tonnage, harbour, light-houses, pilotage, quarantine, or other similar duties, of whatever nature, or under whatever Equalization of denomination, shall be imposed in either country upon the tonnage, harbor, and vessels of the other, in respect of voyages between the United States of America and the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, if laden, or in respect of any voyage, if in ballast, which shall not be equally imposed in the like cases on national vessels.

ARTICLE IV.

Coasting trade.

It is hereby declared, that the stipulations of the present treaty are not to be understood as applying to the navigation and carrying trade between one port and another, situated in the States of either contracting party, such navigation and trade being reserved exclusively to national vessels. Vessels of either country shall, however, be permitted to load or unload the whole or part of their

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