The British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences. Comprising an Accurate and Popular View of the Present Improved State of Human Knowledge, Volume 3

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1809 - Natural history
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Page 34 - I think myself happy, king Agrippa, because I shall answer for myself this day before thee touching all the things whereof I am accused of the Jews : 3 Especially because I know thee to be expert in all customs and questions which are among the Jews : wherefore I beseech thee to hear me patiently.
Page 34 - But say you, though the ideas themselves do not exist without the mind, yet there may be things like them whereof they are copies or resemblances, which things exist without the mind, in an unthinking substance. I answer, an idea can be like nothing but an idea; a colour or figure can be like nothing but another colour or figure.
Page 16 - On this glass was depicted, in chiaroscuro, a string of several thousands of pilasters, all equal in altitude, distance, and degree of light and shade. In a moment they lost half their height, and bent into arcades .like Roman aqueducts. A long cornice was next formed on the top, and above it rose castles innumerable, all perfectly alike. These soon split into towers, which were shortly after lost in colonnades, and, at last, ended in pines, cypresses, and other trees, even and similar. This was...
Page 34 - By this way of analysis we may proceed from compounds to ingredients; and from motions to the forces producing them; and in general, from effects to their causes; and from particular causes to more general ones, till the argument end in the most general.
Page 34 - And although the arguing from experiments and observations by induction be no demonstration of general conclusions, yet it is the best way of arguing which the nature of things admits of, and may be looked upon as so much the stronger, by how much the induction is more general.

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