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Seiner Königliche Hoheit den Gross Herzog zu Sachsen-Weimar durch besondere Uebereinkunft für denjenigen Theil, der Ihnen durch die Wiener Congress-Acte überwiesenen Bevölkerung von 27,000 Einwohnern anderweitig nach besonderer Uebereinkunft schadlos zu halten, welcher Ihnen etwa durch Dispositionen Artikel I, II, und V, einschliesslich nicht übereignet oder vergütet werden möchte. Seine Majestät der König leisten Seiner Königlichen Hoheit dem Kurfürsten Gewähr gegen jede Anforderung, welche wider Verhoffen desshalb an Sie als Besitzer des grössten Theils des vormaligen Departements Fulda gemacht werden follte.

Echange des Ratifications.

XXX. Dieser Vertrag soll ratificirt und die Ratification binnen 4 Wochen oder eher wenn es seyn kann, ausgewechselt werden.

Zu Urkunde dessen haben die beyderseitigen Bevollmächtigten denselden unterzeichnet und mit dem Siegel ihrer Wappen versehen. So geschehen Cassel den 16ten October des Jahres 1815.

(L.S.) CONRAD SIEGMUND KARL VON HANLEIN. (L.S.) GEORG FERDINAND VON LEPEL.

ARTICLE Additionnel et Séparé au Traité (Territorial) du 20 Mai, 1815,* entre_la_Sardaigne et l'Autriche.- Vienne, le 20 Mai, 1815.

Le droit de reversion de Sa Majesté le Roi de Sardaigne sur le Duché de Plaisance, stipulé par le Traité d'Aix-la-Chapelle de 1748+ et par le Traité de Paris du 10 Juin, 1763,‡ est confirmé. Les cas où ce droit devra se réaliser, seront réglés d'un commun accord, lorsque

† See Vol. 1816-17, Page 82.

*See Page 152. ‡ CONVENTION entre Leurs Majcstés le Roi de Sardaigne, le Roi Très-Chrétien, et le Roi Catholique.-Paris, le 10 Juin, 1763.

(Extrait.)

ART. I. Leurs Majestés Très-Chrétienne et Catholique reconnoissent de nouveau, en faveur de Sa Majesté le Roi de Sardaigne, le droit de reversion de la Souveraineté de la Ville de Plaisance et de la partie du Plaisantin jusqu'à la Nura, spécifié dans le Traité d'Aix-la-Chapelle, au cas où la Ligne masculine de l'Infant Don Philippe, Possesseur actuel, viendroit à s'éteindre, de même que dans le cas où ce Prince ou ses Descendans Mâles passeroient par succession à une des Couronnes de Sa Famille.

II. Non-seulement Leurs Majestés Très-Chrétienne et Catholique reconnoissent le droit de reversion en faveur du Roi de Sardaigne spécifié dans l'Article 1.; mais de plus Elles le Lui garantissent expressément par la présente Convention, selon les termes exprimés ci-dessus, et Lui promettent de s'opposer à quiconque entreprendroit d'empêcher l'exécution du dit droit de reversion.

les négociations relatives aux Etats de Parme et de Plaisance seront achevées.

Il est toutefois entendu, que, le cas échéant de cette reversion, la Ville de Plaisance, et un Rayon de 2,000 toises, à partir de la crête du glacier extérieur, resteront en toute souveraineté et propriété à Sa Majesté l'Empereur d'Autriche, ses Héritiers et Successeurs, et qu'il sera cédé en compensation à Sa Majesté le Roi de Sardaigne, une autre partie des Etats de Parme ou autre contigüe à ses Etats en Italie à sa convenance, et équivalente en population et revenu à la Ville de Plaisance et au Rayon ci-dessus.

Le présent Article Additionnel et Séparé aura la même force et valeur que s'il était inséré mot à mot au Traité Patent de ce jour. I sera ratifié et les Ratifications en seront échangées en même tems.

En foi de quoi, les Plénipotentiaires respectifs l'ont sigué, et y ont apposé le Cachet de leurs Armes.

Fait à Vienne, le 20 Mai, l'an de Grâce 1815.

(L.S.) LE MARQUIS DE SAINT MARSAN. (L.S.) LE COMTE ROSSI.

(L.S.) LE PRINCE DE METTERNICH. (L.S.) LE BARON DE WESSENBERG.

REPORT, &c. of the Secretary of War, relative to the organization of the Military Peace Establishment of The United States.-17th May, 1815.

Department of War, 17th May, 1815.

THE Act of Congress of the 3rd of March, 1815, declares, “That the Military Peace Establishment of the The United States, shall consist of such proportions of Artillery, Infantry, and Riflemen, not exceeding in the whole, 10,000 Men, as the President of The United States shall judge proper; that the Corps of Engineers, as at present established, be retained; that the President of The United States cause to be arranged the Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers, Musicians and Privates, of the several Corps of Troops in the service of The United States, in such manner as to form and complete out of the same, the Corps authorised by this Act; and that he cause the Supernumerary Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers, Musicians and Privates, to be discharged from the service of The United States, from and after the first day of May next, or as soon as circumstances may permit."

The President of The United States, having performed the duty which the Law assigned to him, has directed that the organization of the Military Peace Establishment be announced in General Orders; and

that the Supernumerary Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers, Musicians, and Privates, be discharged from the service of The United States, as soon as the circumstances, which are necessary for the payment and discharge of the Troops, will permit.

But on this important and interesting occasion, the President of The United States is aware, that he owes to the feelings of the Nation, as well as to his own feelings, an expression of the high sense entertained of the services of the American Army. Leaving the scenes of private life, the Citizens became the Soldiers of The United States; the spirit of a genuine patriotism quickly pervaded the Military establishment; and the events of the War have conspicuously developed the moral, as well as the physical character of an Army, in which every Man seems to have deemed himself the chosen Champion of his Country.

The pacific policy of the American Government, the domestic habits of the People, and a long sequestration from the use of arms, will justly account for the want of warlike preparation, for an imperfect state of discipline, and for various other sources of embarrassment, or disaster, which existed at the commencement of hostilities: but to account for the achievements of the American Army, in all their splen dor, and for its efficient acquirements in every important branch of the Military art, during a War of little more than 2 years continuance; it is necessary to resort to that principle of action, which, in a free Country, identifies the Citizen with his Government; impels each Individual to seek the knowledge that is requisite for the performance of his duty; and renders every Soldier, in effect, a combatant in his

Own cause.

The President of The United States anticipated from the career of an Army thus constituted, all the glory and the fruits of victory; and it has been his happiness to see a just War terminated by an honorable Peace, after such demonstrations of valor, genius, and enterprize, as secure for the Land and Naval Forces of The United States an imperishable renown; for the Citizens, the best prospect of an undisturbed enjoyment of their rights; and for the Government, the respect and confidence of the World.

To the American Army, which has so nobly contributed to these results, the President of The United States presents this public testimonial of approbation and applause, at the moment when many of its gallant Officers and Men must, unavoidably, be separated from the standard of their Country. Under all Governments, and especially under all free Governments, the restoration of peace has uniformly produced a reduction of the Military Establishment. The United States disbanded in 1800 the Troops which had been raised on account of the differences with France; and the memorable Peace of 1783, was followed by a discharge of the illustrious Army of the

Revolution. The frequency, or the necessity, of the occurrence, does not, however, deprive it of its interest; and the dispersion of the military family, at this juncture, under circumstances peculiarly affecting, cannot fail to awaken all the sympathies of the generous and the just.

The difficulty of accomplishing a satisfactory organization of the Military Peace Establishment, has been anxiously felt. The Act of Congress contemplates a small but an effective Force, and, consequently, the honorable Men, whose years, or infirmities, or wounds, render them incapable of further service, in active warfare, are necessarily excluded from the establishment. The Act contemplates a reduction of the Army from many, to a few Regiments; and consequently, a long list of meritorious Officers must, inevitably, be laid aside. But the attempt has been assiduously made to collect authentic information from every source, as a foundation for an impartial judgment on the various claims to attention; and even while a decision is pronounced, the President of The United States desires it may be distinctly understood, that from the designation of the Officers who are retained in service, nothing more is to be inferred, than his approbation of the designated Individuals, without derogating, in any degree, from the fame and worth of those whose lot it is to retire.

The American Army of the War of 1812 has hitherto successfully emulated the patriotism and the valor of the Army of the War of 1776. The closing scene of the example remains alone to be performed. Having established the independence of their Country, the revolutionary Warriors cheerfully returned to the walks of civil life; many of them became the benefactors and ornaments of society, in the prosecution of various arts and professions; and all of them, as well as the veteran few who survive the lapse of time, have been the objects of grateful recollection, and constant regard. It is for the American Army, now dissolved, to pursue the same honorable course, in order to enjoy the same inestimable reward. The hope may be respectfully indulged, that the beneficence of the Legislative Authority will beam upon suffering merit; an admiring Nation will unite the civic with the martial honors, which adorn its Heroes; and posterity, in its theme of gratitude, will indiscriminately praise the Protectors and the Founders of American Independence.

By order of the President of The United States.

A. J. DALLAS, Acting Secretary of War.

GENTLEMEN,

Department of War, 8th April, 1815.

THE President of The United States has requested your attendance at Washington, with a view to the aid which your experience and information enable you to afford, in forming the Military Peace Establishment, according to the directions of the Act of Congress, passed on the 3rd of March, 1815. I have the honor, therefore, of

calling your attention to this interesting and important business; and
to request an early Report upon the following points; premising that
your Report will be considered as an authentic source of information,
upon the
to which a just respect will be paid in all future deliberations
subject.

1. The organization of the Army.
2. The selection of the Officers.

3. The military stations.

I.-The organization of the Army.

The Act of Congress declares, that the Military Peace Establishment of The United States shall consist of proportions of Artillery, Infantry and Riflemen, not exceeding in the whole 10,000 Men; and that the Corps of Engineers, as at present established, be retained.

Upon full consideration of the terms of the Act, and of the military interpretation given to similar terms, on other occasions, the President is of opinion, that the Military Peace Establishment, so far as it is composed of Artillery, Infantry and Riflemen, is to consist of the number of 10,000 Men, exclusively of Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Musicians; and you will be pleased to conform, in your Report, to that opinion.

The proportions of Artillery, Infantry and Riflemen to compose the Military Peace Establishment of 10,000 Men, are referred to your consideration; and you will be pleased, in your Report, to furnish the necessary details for forming the establishment into Brigades, Regiments, Battalions and Companies. But it is proper to observe, that special provision is made by Law for the organization of the Corps of Artillery, as prescribed in the Act of the 30th March, 1814; for the organization of the Regiment of Light Artillery, as prescribed in the Act of the 12th of April, 1808; and for the organization of the Regiments of Infantry and Riflemen, as prescribed in the Act of the 3rd of March, 1815.

The Law has, also, specially provided that there shall be 4 Brigade Inspectors, 4 Brigade Quarter-Masters, and such number of Hospital Surgeons and Surgeon's Mates, as the service may require, not exceeding 5 Surgeons and 15 Mates, with 1 Steward, and 1 Ward Master to each Hospital. But the Brigade Inspectors are to be taken from the Line, and the Brigade Quarter-Masters, as well as Adjutants, Regimental Quarter-Masters, and Pay-Masters, are to be taken from the Subalterns of the Line.

II.-The selection of the Officers.

The reduction of the Military Establishment to the number of 10,000 Men, sufficiently indicates the intention of Congress to be, that the Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates should be selected and arranged in such manner as to form and complete an

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