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ELECTORAL votes for Presinent and Vice President U.
S., viz:
Fifth term, Thomas Jefferson and George Clinton, com-

mencing 4th March, 1805
Sixth term, James Madison and George Clinton, com-

mencing 4th March, 1803
Seventh term, James Madison and Elbridge Gerry,

commencing 4th March, 1813
Eighth term, James Monroe and Daniel D. Tompkins,

commencing 4th March, 1817
Ninth term, James Monroe and Daniel D. Tompkins,

commencing 4th March, 1821
Tenth term, John Quincy Adams and John C. Cal

houn, elected by the House of Representatives, com-
mencing 4th March, 1825
Eleventh term, Andrew Jackson and John C. Calhoun,

commencing 4th March, 1829
Twelfth term,

Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren,
commencing 4th March, 1833
Thirteenth term, Martin Van Buren and R. M. John-

son, commencing 4th March, 1837
Fourteenth term, Wm. H. Harrison and John Tyler,

commencing 4th March, 1841
Fifteenth term, James K. Polk and George M. Dallas,

commencing 4th March, 1845
ELECTORAL votes for President and Vice President u.

S. Provisions of the Constitution regarding the ELECTORAL votes for President and Vice President u.

S. Regulations, by law, for the giving, making lists of, transmitting to the seat of Government, opening, and counting the ELECTORAL votes, 1792. Compensation to,

ties of, persons appointed to deliver the ELECTORAL votes, 1825. Compensation of persons ap

pointed to deliver the ELECTORS of President and Vice President v. s. Enact

ments of law for the government of the ELECTORS of President and Vice President in all the

States. An act to establish a uniform time for holding

elections of ELECTORS. Each State may, by law, provide for filling

vacancies in the college of ELECTORS of President

and Vice President, equal to the number of Senators and Representatives in Congress from such State. Each State shall appoint a number of

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ELECTORS shall be equal to the number of Senators and

Representatives to which the States may be entitled at the time when the President and Vice President should come into office. The .

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FAREWELL Address of George Washington, President
of the United States, 17th September, 1796

G.
GEORGIA, in 1787, appointing deputies to Convention to

form the Constitution. Act of .
GERRY, Vice President U. S. Election of Elbridge
GERRY, Vice President, in Senate U. S. Attendance of

Elbridge
GOVERNMENT. Thomas Jefferson's declaration of the

principles of our
GOVERNMENT. James Madison's declaration of the

principles of our GOVERNMENT of the Confederation to provide for its

support, defence, &c. Report exhibiting the impotency

of the GOVERNMENT under the Constitution of the U.S. Re

solutions of Congress of the Confederation, of 13th Sept.,
1788, providing for commencement of the

Η.
HARRISON, as President U. S. Election of Wm. Henry
HOUSE of Representatives, from 1789 to 1846. Names of
Speakers of the

I.
IMPOST duties of the 18th April, 1783, was the cause of

proceedings which ultimately led to the adoption of the
Constitution. Report of Committee of the Congress of
Confederation, showing that the failure of the States to

carry out the general system of IMPOST, &c., as provided by resolution of Congress of

18th April, 1783. (See Commerce.) Resolutions of Congress of 15th February, 1786, recommending to the States to empower Congress to carry into effect a general sys

tem of INAUGURAL Address of Thomas Jefferson, 4th March,

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1801. Extract from the .

xxiv of Richard M.

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INAUGURAL Address of James Madison, 4th March,

1809. Extract from the . INAUGURAL Address of George Washington, President

of the United States, on 30th April, 1789 INDEPENDENCE of mind. Importance to every citi

zen of preserving INDEPENDENCE by the Representatives of the United

States in Congress assembled, 4th July, 1776. The De

claration of INDEPENDENCE. Resolution of Congress for promulINTRODUCTORY remarks on the propriety of reading

and understanding the Constitution INTRODUCTORY or explanatory remarks on chapter 2,

or the tables of electoral votes of President and Vice Presidents, of Vice Presidents, Presidents pro tempore, Se

nators and Speakers of the House of Representatives INTRODUCTORY remarks to chapter 3 of official pro

ceedings and proximate causes which led to the adoption
of the Constitution

J.
JACKSON, as President United States. First election of

Andrew
JACKSON, as President United States. Second election

of Andrew .
JEFFERSON'S declaration of the principles of our Gov.

ernment. Thomas JEFFERSON, as Vice President United States. Élection

of Thomas JEFFERSON, as President United States. 'First election

by House of Representatives of Thomas JEFFERSON, as President United States. Second elec

tion by electors of Thomas JEFFERSON, Vice Presideni, in senate United States:

Attendance of Thomas
JOHNSON, as Vice President United States. Election by
the Senate of Richard M.
(The number of electoral votes required for an election

being 148, and R. M. Johnson having received only
147, the election then devolved upon the Senate, and

R. M. Johnson was elected.)
JOHNSON, Vice President, in Senate United States. At-

tendance of Richard M.
JOHNSON, as Senator United States. Terms of service

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K.
KNOWLEDGE. Remarks on the proper mode of acquir-

ing and imparting

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LAW. Definition and sanctity of the civil
LAWS and parts of laws relating to elections or the or-

ganization of the Government, &c.
LIBERTY. Definition of rational or civil
LIBERTY and independence on 4th July, 1776. Declara-

tion of LIBERTY, &c., on 17th June, 1775. ' Declaration of Con

gress for the maintenance of American LIBERTY consists. In what the enjoyment and even the

support and preservation of . LIGHT as regards the fundamental law. Remarks on ne

cessity of the people's having

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MADISON'S declaration of the principles of our Govern

ment. James
MADISON, President United States. First election of

James
MADISON, President United States. Second election of

James
MASSACHUSETTS, in 1787, appointing deputies to con-

vention to form the Constitution. Act of
MARYLAND, in 1787, appointing deputies to convention

to form the Constitution. Act of MESSENGERS or persons to deliver electoral votes. Com

pensation to, and penalties of MESSENGERS or persons to deliver electoral votes. Com

pensation to MIFFLIN, President of Congress, to George Washington,

in answer to his resignation of his commission. Address

of Thomas
MONROE, President United States. Firsi election of James
MONROE, President United States. Second election of
James

N.

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NEW HAMPSHIRE, in 1787, appointing deputies to

Convention to form the Constitution. Act of

144 Page.

NEW JERSEY, at the meeting at Annapolis, in 1786, to

regulate the trade and commerce United States, having more enlarged powers than the Commissioners from other States, was stated as the ground for calling the Convention which formed the Constitution. The Commissioners of

117 NEW JERSEY, in 1786, appointing deputies to Convention to form the Constitution. Acts of

. 126,128 NEW YORK, in 1787, appointing deputies to the Convention to form the Constitution. Act of

139 NORTH CAROLINA, in 1787, appointing deputies to convention to form the Constitution. Act of

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OATH of John Tyler, Vice President, to qualify him as
President United States

53 OATH of office, as President, administered to George

Washington, by the Chancellor of the State of New
York, on 30th April, 1789

175 OATHS to support the Constitution of the United States,

and for performance of official duty, to be taken by the
following officers and persons, viz:
1. The President of the United States

15 2. The President of the Senate

151,152 3. The Senators of the United States

22,151 4. The Secretary of the Senate

151,153 5. The Senators of the United States on trial of im_peachment

4 6. The Speaker of the House of Representatives 151,152 7. The members of the House of Representatives of the United States

22, 151 8. The Clerk of the House of Representatives · 151, 152, 153 9. The members of the several State Legislatures 22, 151, 152 10. The Executive and Judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several States .

22, 151 11. All officers appointed under the authority of the United States

152 12. Each and every clerk and other officer in any of the departments of the United States

153 "OATHS of office” are to be taken. By whom

152,153 OFFICE of President and Vice President to commence on the 4th March, &c. The term of

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